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Don Rickles (1926-2017), master of the insult comedy, known as "The Merchant of Venom" and (ironically) "Mr. Warmth".

Too many people (especially the President) of the Boom Generation still deserve his sort of skewering.

I missed:

Richard Bolles, author of What Color Is Your Parachute?, career guidance for multitudes.
Yevgeny Yevtushenko. Soviet/Russian poet.
Thomas Brandis, great violinist (concert master and chamber ensembles).
Emma Morano, 29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017, the last human verified to have lived in the 19th century, died yesterday.

From Wikipedia.

Quote:Emma Martina Luigia Morano (29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017) was an Italian supercentenarian who, prior to her death at the age of 117 years and 137 days, was the world's oldest living person whose age had been verified, and the last living person to have been verified as being born in the 1800s.

She was the oldest Italian person ever, the second oldest European person ever behind Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, and one of the five verified oldest people ever.
(04-16-2017, 12:12 PM)The Wonkette Wrote: [ -> ]Emma Morano, 29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017, the last human verified to have lived in the 19th century, died yesterday.

From Wikipedia.

Quote:Emma Martina Luigia Morano (29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017) was an Italian supercentenarian who, prior to her death at the age of 117 years and 137 days, was the world's oldest living person whose age had been verified, and the last living person to have been verified as being born in the 1800s.

She was the oldest Italian person ever, the second oldest European person ever behind Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, and one of the five verified oldest people ever.

Does that make her the last Lost?
(04-16-2017, 12:21 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-16-2017, 12:12 PM)The Wonkette Wrote: [ -> ]Emma Morano, 29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017, the last human verified to have lived in the 19th century, died yesterday.

From Wikipedia.

Quote:Emma Martina Luigia Morano (29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017) was an Italian supercentenarian who, prior to her death at the age of 117 years and 137 days, was the world's oldest living person whose age had been verified, and the last living person to have been verified as being born in the 1800s.

She was the oldest Italian person ever, the second oldest European person ever behind Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, and one of the five verified oldest people ever.

Does that make her the last Lost?

Strauss and Howe start the GI Generation  in 1901 but it only applies to the US.  There are two living people who were born in 1900, according to Wikipedia.  One is Jamaican and one is Japanese, so I don't know whether you can properly call them (or Emma Morano, for that matter), "Lost".

The oldest living man, incidentally, is a Holocaust survivor living in Israel.
Our last link to the 1800s is gone. Sad 

I remember as a little kid knowing several people born in the 1890s, including one sweet little old woman who lived in the old-folks apartment across the street from my house who would always spoil us kids with candy.

It's strange to think that at the beginning of the 22nd century we Millennials will be seen similarly to the Lost. We older Millennials will be the last people to have any memory of the 20th century.
(04-16-2017, 12:45 PM)The Wonkette Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-16-2017, 12:21 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-16-2017, 12:12 PM)The Wonkette Wrote: [ -> ]Emma Morano, 29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017, the last human verified to have lived in the 19th century, died yesterday.

From Wikipedia.

Quote:Emma Martina Luigia Morano (29 November 1899 – 15 April 2017) was an Italian supercentenarian who, prior to her death at the age of 117 years and 137 days, was the world's oldest living person whose age had been verified, and the last living person to have been verified as being born in the 1800s.

She was the oldest Italian person ever, the second oldest European person ever behind Frenchwoman Jeanne Calment, and one of the five verified oldest people ever.

Does that make her the last Lost?

Strauss and Howe start the GI Generation  in 1901 but it only applies to the US.  There are two living people who were born in 1900, according to Wikipedia.  One is Jamaican and one is Japanese, so I don't know whether you can properly call them (or Emma Morano, for that matter), "Lost".

The oldest living man, incidentally, is a Holocaust survivor living in Israel.

1900 is still Lost.

The last known Missionary died just before 2000. The last Lost will live into the late 2010s (we are already there). Barring unforeseen extensions of lifespans, the last GIs will be around 2040. the last Silent around 2060, and the last Boomers  most likely around 2080.

With better habits than those of the Lost and with more people, GIs and the Silent (who have been imitating GI habits) may be around for a little longer than the Lost.

Of course people have been trading off social realities (childhood diseases, early starvation) for others (war, executions, plagues, and transportation accidents) that kill young adults, heart disease and cancer, and now prion diseases. Even automobile accidents mirrored horse-related deaths in the pre-automobile era (being thrown by or trampled by horses) in the early part of the 20th century. For now, food supplies are better, medical treatment is more certain, vehicles and roads are becoming safer, and war is becoming a rarity in much of the world.
Disgraced former football star, and more significantly convicted murderer serving a life term, Aaron Hernandez, apparently committed suicide by hanging himself.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/aaro...mg00000009


A hint for survival: avoid disgrace.
(04-16-2017, 03:18 PM)Odin Wrote: [ -> ]Our last link to the 1800s is gone. Sad 

I remember as a little kid knowing several people born in the 1890s, including one sweet little old woman who lived in the old-folks apartment across the street from my house who would always spoil us kids with candy.

It's strange to think that at the beginning of the 22nd century we Millennials will be seen similarly to the Lost. We older Millennials will be the last people to have any memory of the 20th century.

Omg I never thought of that. You are right. We millies will be the last to remember the 20th century not unlike the situation with the lost. We will be seen as time relics.
Just a reminder of the friends that President Trump has.


Quote:A Russian journalist known for his criticism of President Vladimir Putin has died after being beaten by unknown attackers, it has been reported.

Nikolai Andrushchenko, 73, who co-founded the Novy Peterburg newspaper, was attacked six weeks ago and had been in a coma since then.

He died on Wednesday in St Petersburg.

His attackers have not been identified but Novy Peterburg editor Denis Usov linked the assault to articles in the newspaper about corruption in the city.  

Mr Andrushchenko was a member of the St Petersburg city council from 1990 until 1993. He made his name writing about human rights issues and crime.

In 2007 he was imprisoned on charges of defamation and obstruction of justice following his coverage of a murder investigation and trial in St Petersburg, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ).

At the time Mr Andrushchenko's colleagues said they thought his detention was due to Novy Peterburg's critical coverage of local authorities ahead of parliamentary elections.

In November that year he was beaten by unidentified attackers, CPJ said.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/...91461.html
Erin Marie Moran (October 18, 1960 – April 22, 2017) was an American actress, best known for playing Joanie Cunningham on the sitcom Happy Days and its spin-off Joanie Loves Chachi.

Moran was cast as Jenny Jones in the television series Daktari, which ran from 1966 to 1969. In 1968, she made her feature-film debut in How Sweet It Is! with Debbie Reynolds. She appeared in 80 Steps to Jonah (1969) and Watermelon Man (1970). She made regular appearances on The Don Rickles Show in 1972. She made guest appearances in The Courtship of Eddie's Father, My Three Sons, Bearcats! and Family Affair. As a young child, she was also on the television series Gunsmoke.

In 1974, Moran was cast to play her best known role, Joanie Cunningham on the sitcom Happy Days. She played the feisty younger sister of Richie Cunningham (Ron Howard). Moran continued the role in 1982 in the short-lived spin-off series Joanie Loves Chachi, alongside Scott Baio. She won the Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a New Television Series for her role. After Joanie Loves Chachi's cancellation in 1983, she returned to Happy Days for its final season.

Moran made several other television guest appearances, including The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote and Diagnosis: Murder.
In 2008, she was a contestant on VH1's reality show Celebrity Fit Club.
In 2010, she made an appearance in the independent comedy feature Not Another B Movie.
In 2013, despite reports that she would be reunited with former Happy Days co-stars Henry Winkler, Ron Howard, and Scott Baio in the fourth season of Arrested Development, she did not appear in the revamped Netflix series.[1][2]

.....

On April 22, 2017, TMZ reported that Moran had died. Harrison County, Indiana, authorities were alerted to an unresponsive female, later identified as Moran. She was 56.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erin_Moran
[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erin_Moran#cite_note-7][/url]
Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_M._Pirsig
(04-22-2017, 09:50 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]Erin Marie Moran (October 18, 1960 – April 22, 2017) was an American actress, best known for playing Joanie Cunningham on the sitcom Happy Days and its spin-off Joanie Loves Chachi.

<snip>

.....

On April 22, 2017, TMZ reported that Moran had died. Harrison County, Indiana, authorities were alerted to an unresponsive female, later identified as Moran. She was 56.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erin_Moran
[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erin_Moran#cite_note-7][/url]

Damn, that hits way close to home. I remember watching Daktari as a kid, Happy Days as an adolescent. She's only 2 years my elder, even.  For fuck sake, the big "C", even. May she ever rest in peace, man. What a loss. Sad
[I'll be the double nickel next month, May.]  ... I wonder how the "Lassi folks are doing" .
(04-24-2017, 11:03 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]Robert M. Pirsig, author of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_M._Pirsig

Respected and influential in counter-cultural circles and among the reflective and rebellious creative folk. His quest for "quality" echoed my own. His philosophy resembles Bergson, William James and Whitehead, as well as influenced strongly by Plato and Buddhism. He burst through the gap between the false isolated self and the world. I heard much about his Zen book without actually ever reading it. Sorry to see another voice of authenticity slip into the next world.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirsig%27s...of_Quality
Robert Jonathan Demme (/ˈdɛmi/; February 22, 1944 – April 26, 2017)[1] was an American filmmaker, producer and screenwriter. Demme rose to prominence in the 1980s with his comedy films Melvin and Howard (1980), Swing Shift (1984), Something Wild (1986) and Married to the Mob (1988). He became best known for directing The Silence of the Lambs (1991), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Director. He later directed the acclaimed films Philadelphia (1993) and Rachel Getting Married (2008).



Much more here.
Good riddance to this vile cult leader and sexual pervert.


Quote:LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) Disgraced preacher Tony Alamo, who was convicted in Arkansas of sexually abusing girls he considered his wives, has died in a North Carolina prison.

He was 82.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons says Alamo died Tuesday while in a federal prison hospital in Butner, N.C.

Alamo was convicted in 2009 of taking underage girls across state lines for sex, including a 9-year-old.

He was sentenced to 175 years in prison.

The one-time street preacher in Los Angeles expanded his anti-Catholic, apocalyptic ministry into a multimillion-dollar network of businesses and property.

Members were once known for designing elaborate jackets for celebrities, including Michael Jackson.

Alamo preached that polygamy was OK.

Witnesses say he made all the decisions at his compound in southwest Arkansas, including who got married and who was allowed to eat.

http://www.kwtx.com/content/news/Disgrac...ml?ref=483

I suppose that he gets to experience the 'post-life' existence as depicted in Dante's Inferno.
(05-05-2017, 10:38 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]This one happened a few weeks ago. RIP John Lever (of the 1961 cohort):

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/m...ummer-dies

We Ataris are increasing our rate of demise .... Oldtimer

==============================================
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cult



Dude.... It's no surprise.   We Joneser X'ers have that as our destiny. We have in all our lives are the high point in
social pathologies. In youth, we set records, and likewise in mid age just continue on with our issues. It's still a live fast, die young. Those of us who live on will break eggs to make omelets. Cool Big Grin Tongue 







Can ya did it, man?
Edward Crawford, protester from iconic Ferguson photo, dead from self-inflicted gunshot in St. Louis

[Image: imrs.jpg]

Quote:Crawford would become a nationally recognized symbol of the unrest in Ferguson when, dressed in an American flag tank top and clutching a bag of potato chips, he picked up a tear-gas canister and tossed it back toward riot gear-clad officers. The scene was captured by the lens of St. Louis Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen and was part of the package that earned the paper a Pulitzer Prize for their photography of the unrest.

Crawford Jr., 27, died Thursday night after what police say was a self-inflicted gunshot wound, leaving behind four children.

According to police, Crawford was riding in the backseat of a vehicle that evening when he began telling the two other occupants that he was depressed.

“The victim began expressing he was distraught over personal matters to the witnesses,” Leah Freeman, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis Metropolitan Police, said in a statement. “The witnesses heard the victim rummaging in the backseat, then heard a gunshot and observed the victim had sustained a gunshot wound to the head...”

...His death comes eight months after the murder of Darren Seals, a prominent Ferguson activist who was found shot dead in a burning car last September, prompting some to question whether Crawford’s death was truly a suicide. St. Louis County PD said Friday that the investigation into Seals’s death remains active. (Another man, Deandre Joshua was found shot to death in a burning car in Ferguson on the night of the grand jury decision not to indict officer Darren Wilson)...

...Enshrined in the minds of many as a symbol of defiant protest — which he said in interviews had brought attention to issues of police impunity and brutality that had long been overlooked — Crawford always expressed skepticism about whether real, sustained change would ever come to the people of Ferguson.

“You’re gonna write your story, and you’re gonna leave town, and nothing is going to change,” he told this reporter in August 2014. “One day, one month, one year from now, after you leave, it’s still going to be f–ked up in Ferguson.”
Adolph Gustav Kiefer (June 27, 1918 – May 5, 2017[1]) was an American competition swimmer, Olympic competitor, the last surviving gold medalist of the 1936 Summer Olympics and former world record-holder. He was the first man in the world to swim the 100-yard backstroke in under one minute.[2] Kiefer was also an inventor and innovator of new products related to aquatics competition.

He became the first man to break the one-minute mark in the 100-yard backstroke while competing as a 16-year-old in the Illinois High School Championships of 1935, swimming 59.8 seconds. His 1936 Illinois state championship backstroke time of 58.5 seconds was the Illinois state high-school record until 1960. On April 6, 1940, Kiefer set another world record, swimming the 100-yard backstroke in 57.9 seconds. He broke twenty-three records after breaking the one-minute backstroke mark.[4] Kiefer set a world record for the 100-meter backstroke of 1:04.8 on January 18, 1936, at Brennan Pools in Detroit, Michigan.

Eighteen-year-old Kiefer represented the United States at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany.[4] On August 14, Kiefer won the gold medal in the men's 100-meter backstroke.[4] He set new Olympic records in the first-round heats (1:06.9), the second-round heats (1:06.8), and the event final (1:05.9). His Olympic Record would stand for over 20 years, finally broken by David Theile in the 1956 Summer Olympics.

He returned home a national hero, and began traveling with other U.S. Olympic medalists on a tour of Europe, China, Japan, and South America, during which he challenged other great swimmers in those locations to individual races.
In over 2,000 races, Kiefer lost only twice. At the National AAU swimming championship in April 1943, University of Michigan All-American swimmer Harry Holiday, Jr. finally went head-to-head with world-record holder Kiefer. Holiday beat him in the 150-yard backstroke at the AAU meet.[5] The defeat was the first for Kiefer in eight years.[6][7]

In his first two months of varsity competition, Holiday broke two of Kiefer's world records, lowering the 100-yard backstroke mark to 57 seconds and the 200-meter standard to 2:22.9.[8] In August 1943, the NCAA also recognized Holiday as the holder of the new world record in the 150-yard backstroke with a mark of 1:31.5.[9] Shortly thereafter, Kiefer was asked to audition for the role of "Tarzan", but answered the call of arms instead, joining the U.S. Navy.

He joined the U.S. Navy as a Chief Petty Officer in late 1943 and was initially assigned to the physical fitness and swimming division of the United States Navy's Bureau of Naval Personnel (BUPERS) as a Chief Athletics Specialist.[10] When the Navy realized that it was losing more lives to drowning than to enemy bullets, Kiefer was appointed to a committee to set new guidelines for safety and training. He quickly moved through the ranks, becoming Officer in Charge of Swimming for the entire U.S. Navy, training over 13,000 navy swim instructors to do the "Victory backstroke", a term Kiefer coined himself.[2] Victory backstroke was a simplified version of the modern backstroke that allowed novice swimmers to breathe easily (on their backs) while leveraging what Adolph considered to be a more buoyant stroke style for novice swimmers. Victory backstroke was performed with both arms underwater, sweeping down simultaneously (instead of using alternating arms), while using a freestyle kick. The American Red Cross would later add Victory Backstroke to their swim training protocols.
By the war's end, he had reached the rank of Lieutenant, Senior Grade.

In 1947, he established Adolph Kiefer & Associates, Inc. in Chicago, which has provided swimmers with training, safety, and competition equipment.[10] His company was responsible for the development of the nylon tank suit in 1948.[11] and debuted the first nylon swimsuit supplied to the U.S. Olympic Swim Team—a marked improvement over the wool and cotton suits available at the time.
Kiefer subsequently devoted himself to community service, combining swimming and philanthropy in innovative ways. In the 1960s he worked with Mayor Richard J. Daley to build swimming-pools across the inner city of Chicago, providing the facilities needed for thousands of children to learn to swim. Kiefer actively supported Swim Across America, a nonprofit organization that raises funds for cancer research, and participated in SAA public swimming events well into his 70s and 80s.[12]

Kiefer was an "Honor Swimmer" member of the inaugural class inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1965.[13] In 1966 he patented the first design for a no-wave, non-turbulence racing lane.
In 2008 Kiefer celebrated his 90th birthday in Omaha at the 2008 U.S. Swimming Olympic Trials, where he awarded medals for the 200-meter backstroke. On June 27, 2012, he celebrated his birthday again in Omaha at the 2012 U.S. Swimming Olympic Trials—by awarding the medals for the 200-meter backstroke. In 2013 USA Swimming named Kiefer the "father of American swimming" in recognition of his contributions to American swimming.[14]

On the morning of May 5, 2017, Kiefer died at home in Wadsworth, Illinois.[15]
Great player for the Detroit Lions, one of the last survivors from the last Detroit Lions' championship team of 1957.

The Detroit Lions were not then the laughing stock of the NFL as they have typically been since the 1960s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yale_Lary
Mauno Koivisto, President of Finland while his country's giant neighbor to the east and south was undergoing great political upheavals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauno_Koivisto
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