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(03-16-2019, 01:23 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]Former US Senator Birch Bayh, D-IN (1928-2019).

The Great Society Democrats are dying off.

Dying off, and yet they are still ahead of their time, compared to today's regime.
(03-18-2019, 10:54 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-16-2019, 01:23 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]Former US Senator Birch Bayh, D-IN (1928-2019).

The Great Society Democrats are dying off.

Dying off, and yet they are still ahead of their time, compared to today's regime.

Selfishness, cruelty, recklessness, folly, and inequity get very stale very fast.

The Silent are dying off, and the last ones with power -- which I can imagine including Joe Biden or Bernie Sanders as president, considering how badly Boomers have fcuked up with Dubya and Trump, let alone some of the worst business executives and non-profit administrators of all time  -- will be the last. They would set a short-lived, unique style for probably a short moment in time.

But much good can happen in a short time in the long span of history. The Silent have never defined the Presidency as an Adaptive phenomenon. Maybe we would be far better off had we had someone like McCain, Lugar, or Voinovich as President instead of Dubya... d@mn Karl Rove for that "black baby" smear of McCain in 2000!

I have known people to be emotionally healthy and intellectually active into their 90s, if necessary. But we all know the risks. Someone like Donald Trump who demands more power than the Constitution allows and can ill use what he has may go mad if he was not so to begin with. 

If we are to get a President like Biden or Sanders who will cross age 80 even in his first term, then he must recognize the perils of aging (Trump is worse than Reagan in having people to take his reactionary ideals on more extreme courses rather than to have people capable of backtracking when necessary), have competent understudies, and contemplate retirement if the signs of mental degradation set in severely. If we elect Biden or Sanders, the choice of VP had better have the possibility of the 47th President needing to step in instead of "it would be great to pick up (name state)".

We will need to undo the Trump-era damage to our institutions. Maybe just having the decency and caution that Trump lacks will be key.
Michel  Bacos, Air France pilot and hero of the Entebbe hijacking (1976):

Michel Bacos (c. 1924 – 26 March 2019)[1][2] was the captain of Air France Flight 139 when the aircraft was hijacked on June 27, 1976, by Palestinian and German terrorists.[3][4][5] The hijacking, by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), was part of an international campaign of Palestinian terrorism.[5]

Bacos was a recipient of the National Order of the Legion of Honour, the highest decoration in France.[6][7] He was also awarded a medal by the Israeli government for refusing to leave his Jewish passengers behind when the terrorists released their non-Jewish hostages and offered to release Bacos and his crew.[8]

His Airbus A300 flight originated in Tel Aviv and was on its way from Athens to Paris with Bacos at the controls. Minutes into the flight, Bacos heard screams and quickly realized that the plane was hijacked.[3][5][9] Bacos was forced to re-route the plane, at gunpoint.[10] He recalled later: "The terrorist had his gun pointed continuously at my head and occasionally he would poke my neck not to look at him. We could only obey the orders of the terrorists."[3] Bacos was forced to turn the plane south to Benghazi, Libya, for refueling,[11] and then he was forced to fly it in a south-eastern direction. He ultimately landed the jet at Entebbe in Uganda, with only 20 more minutes of fuel left.[5][9]

The terrorists freed the 148 non-Jewish passengers, and offered to release Bacos and his crew. They felt duty-bound to remain on the plane, and refused to leave. They stayed behind with the Jewish hostages.[11][3] The captives were freed in an Israeli commando raid known as Operation Entebbe, and Bacos was dazed in the attack.[12][13]


In 1976, Bacos was awarded the National Order of the Legion of Honour, the highest decoration in France, by the President of France.[6] The Israeli government awarded Bacos and his crew medals for heroism, for refusing to leave the Jewish passengers behind.[8] In June 2008, Bacos was awarded the B'nai B'rith International "Ménoras d'Or" (Golden Menorah) in Cannes, France.[14] Bacos retired from Air France in 1982, and resided in Nice, France with his wife as of 2006. At that time, he had seven grandchildren.[2] In 2016, the American Jewish Congress awarded Bacos the organization's Moral Courage Award. Bacos lived in Nice at at the time of his passing. Nice Mayor Christian Estrosi recognized Bacos, saying: "Michel, bravely refusing to give in to anti-Semitism and barbarism, did honor to France. The love of France and the defense of liberties have marked his destiny."[15]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Bacos
From the "Blood on the Water" game of the usually-civilized sport of water polo (Hungary versus the Soviet Union in the 1956 Summer Olympics):


Miklós (Nick) Martin (June 29, 1931 – March 25, 2019) was a Hungarian water polo player who competed in the 1952 and 1956 Summer Olympics. He was born in Budapest. He died in Pasadena, CA.

Martin was part of the Hungarian team which won the gold medals in the 1952 and the 1956 tournaments. He played two matches, including the "Blood in the Water" semi-final match against the Soviet Union, and scored five goals. His name is often left out of the 1956 Olympics because he defected to the United States immediately after the games, along with numerous fellow Olympians, and the communist party of Hungary at the time omitted him. In all, the U.S. State Department granted asylum to 34 of the Hungarian athletes.[1]

In June 2012, the magazine Sports Illustrated published a detailed account of the Hungarian defections that resulted from the Soviet Union's involvement in Hungary. The magazine itself played a key role in facilitating a secret plan to bring defecting Olympians to the United States. When the Hungarian delegation touched down in Darwin, Australia, Martin, one of the only athletes who read English, found a newspaper in the transit lounge and shared its reports. He became one of the primary spokespeople for the group.[2]

As the best English speaker among the Hungarian Olympians who defected, Martin found himself quoted so often that he feared he would be punished as a ringleader if he were to return to Hungary. So, with an art history master's degree from the University of Budapest, he enrolled at the University of Southern California but played only one semester of water polo because he found the sport there "too Mickey Mouse." He was the first person to receive a water polo scholarship to USC.[3] Instead he buckled down, earned his B.A. in French in three terms and, after earning a Ph.D. in Romance languages at Princeton on a Woodrow Wilson scholarship, became a professor. "The U.S. of that period was a land of endless opportunities," he says, "but my teaching career has been like an avalanche, straight down -- from Princeton to USC to Pasadena City College." Although retired from full-time teaching and over 80, he was still an adjunct professor of French at PCC and swam a mile each day. "PCC has a gorgeous pool," he says, "and I have the key."[4]

In 2006, Colin K. Gray and Megan Raney directed "Freedom's Fury", a film about the 1956 Olympic water polo semi-final match between Hungary and the U.S.S.R.[5] Nick Martin appears as himself.

In 2012, Martin participated in a video interview held at PCC’s Aquatic Center as part of an in-depth feature by CNN/SI on the 1956 Hungarian Olympic team.[6]

Martin retired as an associate professor in the French department of Pasadena City College.[7] He was a full-time faculty member for 44 years, and spent 27 years as head coach of the Pasadena City College men's water polo team.[8]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikl%C3%B3...#Biography
Ranking Roger, Frontman For The English Beat, Dies At 56  

Quote:Roger Charlery, best known as Ranking Roger, singer of the widely influential U.K. group The Beat — known as The English Beat in the U.S. — died Tuesday afternoon, at 56. The singer was diagnosed with brain tumors and lung cancer last year. His death was announced on the website of The Beat, and confirmed to NPR by the group's manager, Tarquin Gotch.





(21 February 1963 – 26 March 2019)  Born in Birmingham, UK
Some of these new wave/punk musicians didn't take very good care of themselves, I guess. Along with some sixties ones, we know about them... too bad....
(03-28-2019, 02:58 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]Some of these new wave/punk musicians didn't take very good care of themselves, I guess. Along with some sixties ones, we know about them... too bad....

Cancer affects many people.  Sometimes it happens to people who have not necessarily taken poor care of themselves.  It sounds like he had lung cancer, he might have been a smoker.
(03-28-2019, 03:43 PM)gabrielle Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-28-2019, 02:58 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]Some of these new wave/punk musicians didn't take very good care of themselves, I guess. Along with some sixties ones, we know about them... too bad....

Cancer affects many people.  Sometimes it happens to people who have not necessarily taken poor care of themselves.  It sounds like he had lung cancer, he might have been a smoker.

-- this is true. Linda McCartney took good care of herself, wrote cookbooks about eating healthy, & she passed from cancer. I remember thinking @ the time, if cancer can take her it can take anybody
The official (and only authorized) photographer of the WWII-era 'closed city' of Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

James Edward Westcott (January 20, 1922 – March 29, 2019) was an American photographer who was noted for his work with the United States government in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during the Manhattan Project and the Cold War. As one of the few people permitted to have a camera in the Oak Ridge area during the Manhattan Project, he created the main visual record of the construction and operation of the Oak Ridge production facilities and of civilian life in the enclosed community of Oak Ridge.[1]

Much more at Wikipedia.
(03-29-2019, 09:50 AM)Marypoza Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-28-2019, 03:43 PM)gabrielle Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-28-2019, 02:58 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]Some of these new wave/punk musicians didn't take very good care of themselves, I guess. Along with some sixties ones, we know about them... too bad....

Cancer affects many people.  Sometimes it happens to people who have not necessarily taken poor care of themselves.  It sounds like he had lung cancer, he might have been a smoker.

-- this is true. Linda McCartney took good care of herself, wrote cookbooks about eating healthy, & she passed from cancer. I remember thinking @ the time, if cancer can take her it can take anybody

There is a reason it happens, but we may not know what it is.
The man who created the modern paint-by-numbers craze. WTOL-TV, CBS-11, Toledo, Ohio.


TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — The artist who created the first paint-by-numbers pictures and helped turn the kits into an American sensation during the 1950s has died, his family confirmed.
Dan Robbins' son says his father died Monday in Sylvania, Ohio. He was 93.
Robbins came up with the idea for paint-by-numbers photos in the 1940s while working for the Palmer Paint Company in Detroit.
He remembered hearing that Leonardo de Vinci would use numbered backgrounds for his students and decided to try it.
By 1955, the company was selling 20 million kits a year. Sales dropped sharply within a few years.
Some critics mocked the paintings, but they've endured as slices of Americana.
The Smithsonian Institution celebrated the paint-by-numbers craze and its impact with a 2001 exhibition at the National Museum of American History.
Copyright 2019 Associated Press. All rights reserved.


http://www.wtol.com/2019/04/04/sylvania-artist-who-created-paint-by-numbers-pictures-dies/
Former US Senator Fritz Hollings, 97

One of South Carolina’s political titans has passed.
Ernest F. Hollings died on Saturday.
Hollings was 97.
Better known as “Fritz” Hollings, the South Carolina Democrat served in the state’s House of Representatives before becoming Lieutenant Governor in 1954. He was elected governor of the state in 1958. He won a special election for one of South Carolina’s U.S. Senate seats in 1966 where he served until 2003.


Gov. Henry McMaster released a statement on Hollings’ death saying, “One of South Carolina’s greatest lions roars no more. Fierce, bold, and robust – the sounds of Fritz Hollings’ vision and drive for the Palmetto State will continue to be heard by generations. The greatness and success of this state has benefited from the hand of his leadership. Peggy and I are heartened at his reunion with Peatsy and offer our prayers and condolences to the family.”

Condolences and praise for the long-serving senator came in from across South Carolina.
Charleston Mayor John Tecklenburg said Hollings “was truly a man in full – a history-making governor, a titan of the US Senate, and a peerless friend to all who were fortunate enough to know him. Our state and nation have lost a real giant.”
Tecklenburg who helped Hollings in his political career also spoke to his marriage.
“For more than forty years, Fritz and Peatsy Hollings loved each other completely and without reservation,” Tecklenburg said. “Separately, they were smart and funny and formidable; together, they were magic. And when it became clear that Peatsy would be the first to move from this world to the next, Fritz responded with a manner and measure of tenderness that surprised even those who knew him best, and that none who witnessed it will ever forget.”
Sen. Tim Scott also penned a statement about Hollings.

“From his time as a solider in World War Two, to shepherding peaceful desegregation as Governor, or fighting for the American worker in the United States Senate, Fritz Hollings was a statesman who never lost his love for the Lowcountry, for South Carolina, and for his wife—Peatsy. I join the people of South Carolina in praying for the Hollings Family as we celebrate his lifetime of public service.”

Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/news/politics-g...rylink=cpy




Read more here: https://www.thestate.com/news/politics-g...rylink=cpy
I don't understand the importance of his achievements because I don't understand the physics. The Nobel Committee did, and what he did sounds either currently or potentially important.

David James Thouless FRS[2] (/ˈθaʊlɛs/; 21 September 1934 – 6 April 2019)[5][6][7] was a British condensed-matter physicist.[8] He was a winner of the 1990 Wolf Prize and laureate of the 2016 Nobel Prize for physics along with F. Duncan M. Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter.[9]


Born in Bearsden, Scotland,[10] Thouless was educated at Winchester College and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Natural Sciences from the University of Cambridge as an undergraduate student of Trinity Hall, Cambridge.[1] He obtained his PhD at Cornell University,[5][11] where Hans Bethe was his doctoral advisor.[4][12]

Thouless was a postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California Berkeley (he also worked in the physics department) from 1958 to 1959.[13][14] He was the first Director of Studies in Physics at Churchill College, Cambridge in 1961–1965, professor of mathematical physics at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom in 1965–1978,[15] and professor of Applied Science at Yale University from 1979 to 1980,[14] before becoming a professor of physics at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1980.[15] Thouless made many theoretical contributions to the understanding of extended systems of atoms and electrons, and of nucleons.[16][17][18] His work includes work on superconductivity phenomena, properties of nuclear matter, and excited collective motions within nuclei.[16][17][18]

Thouless made many important contributions to the theory of many-body problems.[18] For atomic nucleii, he cleared up the concept of 'rearrangement energy' and derived an expression for the moment of inertia of deformed nuclei.[18] In statistical mechanics, he contributed many ideas to the understanding of ordering, including the concept of 'topological ordering'.[18] Other important results relate to localised electron states in disordered lattices.[2][18]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_J._Thouless
The last surviving flyer of the Doolittle Raid:

Richard E. Cole (September 7, 1915 – April 9, 2019) was a retired career officer in the United States Air Force. He was one of the airmen who took part in the Doolittle Raid, serving as the co-pilot to Jimmy Doolittle in the lead plane of the raid.

Cole remained in China after the raid until June 1943, and served again in the China Burma India Theater from October 1943 until June 1944. He later served as Operations Advisor to the Venezuelan Air Force from 1959 to 1962. He retired from the Air Force in 1966 and in 2016, became the last living Doolittle Raider.[1]

Cole enlisted as an aviation cadet on November 22, 1940 at Lubbock, Texas. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in July 1941 and rated as a pilot.[2]


Main article: Doolittle Raid
Cole was assigned as the co-pilot of the 1st aircraft, Plane # 40-2344. This was the first B-25 to depart the deck of the Hornet, and it was piloted by the leader of the raid, Jimmy Doolittle.[3]
On April 18, 1942, Doolittle and his B-25 crew took off from the Hornet, reached Japan, bombed their target, then headed for their recovery airfield in China. Doolittle and his crew bailed out safely over China when their B-25 ran out of fuel. By then, they had been flying for about 12 hours, it was nighttime, the weather was stormy, and Doolittle was unable to locate their landing field. Doolittle came down in a rice paddy near Chuchow (Quzhou). He and his crew linked up after the bailout and were helped through Japanese lines by Chinese guerrillas and American missionary John Birch.[citation needed]

Cole is the last surviving airman to participate in the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo in April 1942; David Thatcher died on June 23, 2016.[2][4][5]
On September 19, 2016, the Northrup Grumman B-21 was formally named "Raider" in honor of the Doolittle Raiders.[6] As the last surviving Raider, Cole was present at the naming ceremony at the Air Force Association conference.[7]
He died on April 9, 2019, aged 103.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_E._Cole
Hall of Fame female golfer.

Marilynn Smith (April 13, 1929 – April 9, 2019)[1] was an American professional golfer. She was one of the thirteen founders of the LPGA in 1950. She won two major championships and 21 LPGA Tour events in all. She is a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame


Smith turned pro in 1949 and joined the Spalding staff. She was one of the thirteen women who founded the LPGA in 1950. She won her first tournament in 1952 at the Fort Wayne Open. She would go on to win a total of 21 events on the LPGA Tour, including two major championships, the 1963 and 1964 Titleholders Championships. She finished in the top ten on the money list nine times between 1961 and 1972, with her best finishes being fourth places in 1963, 1968 and 1970. She was named the LPGA Most Improved Player in 1963. She was the LPGA's president from 1958 to 1960. She was selected for membership of the World Golf Hall of Fame in the Lifetime Achievement category in June 2006 and was inducted in October 2006.[2]

In 1973 she became the first woman to work on a men's golf television broadcast.[3]
She died on April 9, 2019, four days before her 90th birthday.


http://www.lpga.com/players/marilynn-smi...1/overview
Yes -- there can be life after a scandal!



Charles Lincoln Van Doren (February 12, 1926 – April 9, 2019)[1] was an American writer and editor who was involved in a television quiz show scandal in the 1950s. In 1959 he testified before the United States Congress that he had been given the correct answers by the producers of the show Twenty-One. Terminated by NBC, he joined Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., in 1959, becoming a vice-president and writing and editing many books before retiring in 1982. 


On November 28, 1956, Van Doren made his first appearance on the NBC quiz show Twenty-One.[3] Twenty-One was not Van Doren's first game show interest. He was long believed to have approached producers Dan Enright and Albert Freedman, originally, to appear on Tic-Tac-Dough, another game they produced. Van Doren eventually revealed—five decades after his Twenty-One championship and fame, in a surprise article for The New Yorker—that he did not even own a television set, but had met Freedman through a mutual friend, with Freedman initiating the idea of Van Doren going on television by way of asking what he thought of Tic-Tac-Dough.[4]
Enright and Freedman were impressed by Van Doren's polite style and telegenic appearance, thinking the youthful Columbia teacher would be the man to defeat their incumbent Twenty-One champion, Herb Stempel, and boost the show's slowing ratings as Stempel's reign continued.[citation needed]

In January 1957, Van Doren entered a winning streak that ultimately earned him $129,000 (the equivalent of $1,150,759 today) and made him famous, including an appearance on the cover of Time on February 11, 1957. His Twenty-One run ended on March 11, when he lost to Vivienne Nearing, a lawyer whose husband Van Doren had previously beaten. After his defeat he was offered a three-year contract with NBC.[citation needed]

Numerous writings since have suggested Van Doren was offered a job as a special "cultural correspondent" for The Today Show almost at once—but Van Doren subsequently reminded people that his first job was as a newswriter, short-lived, before he began doing small pieces for Today host Dave Garroway's weekend cultural program, Wide Wide World—pieces that led quickly to Garroway's inviting Van Doren to join Today. Van Doren also made guest appearances on other NBC programs, even serving as Today's substitute host when Garroway took a brief vacation.[citation needed]

On November 28, 1956, Van Doren made his first appearance on the NBC quiz show Twenty-One.[3] Twenty-One was not Van Doren's first game show interest. He was long believed to have approached producers Dan Enright and Albert Freedman, originally, to appear on Tic-Tac-Dough, another game they produced. Van Doren eventually revealed—five decades after his Twenty-One championship and fame, in a surprise article for The New Yorker—that he did not even own a television set, but had met Freedman through a mutual friend, with Freedman initiating the idea of Van Doren going on television by way of asking what he thought of Tic-Tac-Dough.[4]
Enright and Freedman were impressed by Van Doren's polite style and telegenic appearance, thinking the youthful Columbia teacher would be the man to defeat their incumbent Twenty-One champion, Herb Stempel, and boost the show's slowing ratings as Stempel's reign continued.[citation needed]

In January 1957, Van Doren entered a winning streak that ultimately earned him $129,000 (the equivalent of $1,150,759 today) and made him famous, including an appearance on the cover of Time on February 11, 1957. His Twenty-One run ended on March 11, when he lost to Vivienne Nearing, a lawyer whose husband Van Doren had previously beaten. After his defeat he was offered a three-year contract with NBC.[citation needed]

Numerous writings since have suggested Van Doren was offered a job as a special "cultural correspondent" for The Today Show almost at once—but Van Doren subsequently reminded people that his first job was as a newswriter, short-lived, before he began doing small pieces for Today host Dave Garroway's weekend cultural program, Wide Wide World—pieces that led quickly to Garroway's inviting Van Doren to join Today. Van Doren also made guest appearances on other NBC programs, even serving as Today's substitute host when Garroway took a brief vacation.[citation needed]


When allegations of cheating were first raised by Stempel and others, Van Doren denied any wrongdoing, saying, "It's silly and distressing to think that people don't have more faith in quiz shows." As the investigation by the district attorney's office and eventually the United States Congress progressed, Charles Van Doren, now host on The Today Show, was under pressure from NBC to testify but went into hiding in order to avoid the committee's subpoena. It was another former Twenty-One contestant, the artist James Snodgrass, who would finally provide indisputable corroborating proof that the show had been rigged. Snodgrass had documented every answer he was coached on in a series of registered letters he mailed to himself prior to the show's being broadcast.[5]

One month after the hearings began, Van Doren emerged from hiding and confessed before the committee that he had been complicit in the fraud.[6] On November 2, 1959, he admitted to the House Subcommittee on Legislative Oversight, a United States Congress subcommittee, chaired by Arkansas Democrat Oren Harris, that he had been given questions and answers in advance of the show.

Quote:I was involved, deeply involved, in a deception. The fact that I, too, was very much deceived cannot keep me from being the principal victim of that deception, because I was its principal symbol. There may be a kind of justice in that. I don’t know. I do know, and I can say it proudly to this committee, that since Friday, October 16, when I finally came to a full understanding of what I had done and of what I must do, I have taken a number of steps toward trying to make up for it. I have a long way to go. I have deceived my friends, and I had millions of them. Whatever their feeling for me now, my affection for them is stronger today than ever before. I am making this statement because of them. I hope my being here will serve them well and lastingly.

I asked (co-producer Albert Freedman) to let me go on (Twenty-One) honestly, without receiving help. He said that was impossible. He told me that I would not have a chance to defeat Stempel because he was too knowledgeable. He also told me that the show was merely entertainment and that giving help to quiz contests was a common practice and merely a part of show business. This of course was not true, but perhaps I wanted to believe him. He also stressed the fact that by appearing on a nationally televised program I would be doing a great service to the intellectual life, to teachers and to education in general, by increasing public respect for the work of the mind through my performances. In fact, I think I have done a disservice to all of them. I deeply regret this, since I believe nothing is of more vital importance to our civilization than education.[7]
Authorities differ regarding the audience's reaction to Van Doren's statement. David Halberstam writes in his book The Fifties:
Quote:Aware of Van Doren's great popularity, the committee members handled him gently and repeatedly praised him for his candor. Only Congressman Steve Derounian announced that he saw no particular point in praising someone of Van Doren's exceptional talents and intelligence for simply telling the truth. With that, the room suddenly exploded with applause, and [Congressional investigator] Richard N. Goodwin knew at that moment ordinary people would not so easily forgive Van Doren.[8]
By contrast, William Manchester, in his narrative history The Glory and the Dream, recounts a diametrically opposite response:
Quote:The crowd at the hearing had been with Van Doren, applauding him and his admirers on the subcommittee and greeting Congressman Derounian's comment with stony silence.[9]
An Associated Press story dated November 2, 1959, seems to verify Halberstam's version of events:
Quote:While there was a burst of applause when Mr. Harris dismissed Mr. Van Doren with a "God bless you", there was applause, too, when Rep. Steven B. Derounian, Republican, New York, declined to go along with compliments that other committee members showered on the witness for telling the truth. "I don't think an adult of your intelligence ought to be commended for telling the truth," Mr. Derounian declared in severe tones. Mr. Van Doren winced, flushed, and ducked his head.[10][11]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Van_Doren
Catalan politician in Republican Spain (the Spanish Republic of the 1930s allowed much autonomy for regions of Spain, member of the French Resistance, and survivor of a Nazi concentration camp.

Neus Català Pallejà (6 October 1915 – 13 April 2019),[1] was a member of the Unified Socialist Party of Catalonia (Catalan: Partit Socialista Unificat de Catalunya, PSUC) during the Spanish Civil War and is the only Spanish survivor of the concentration camp of Ravensbrück. She turned 100 in October 2015.[2]

 
Neus Català was born on 6 October 1915 in Els Guiamets (Priorat, Tarragona, Catalonia). However, her godmother officially registered her birth on 15 June that year, because of the disappearance of the documentation of the Municipality of Barcelona after the Spanish Civil War. This date is considered official and was used to celebrate the centenary of her birth. Català obtained her nursing degree in 1937 and moved to Barcelona at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. In 1939, she crossed the French border, taking with her 180 orphaned children of the colony Las Acacias from Premià de Dalt, better known as the Children of Negrin. She collaborated with her husband, the Occitan, Albert Roger,[3] in the activities of the French Resistance, centralizing (at her home) the reception and transmission of messages, documents, weapons, and sheltering political refugees. She was reported to the national socialist authorities by a pharmacist of Sarlat. She and her husband were later arrested by the Nazis in 1943. Català was imprisoned and mistreated in Limoges, and in 1944 she was deported to Ravensbrück, where she was forced to work in the armaments industry. There, she was part of the "Lazy Commandos" (Spanish: Comando de las gandulas), a group of women who boycotted the manufacture of weapons in Holleischen, a factory which depended on the concentration camp of Flossenburg.[4] Thanks to sabotage, the facility produced about 10 million faulty bullets and marred numerous weapons making machines.[5] After her release, she returned to France where she continued her clandestine struggle against Francoist Spain. She lived in Sarcelles, near the city of Paris, and chaired the Association of Victims of Ravensbrück.[6] Currently, she continues her membership in the Communist Party of Catalonia (PCC), United and Alternative Left (EUiA), and the Pere Ardiaca Foundation, of which she is a member of honor.

Neus Català's graphic material about Spanish Civil War, Germany Nazi, concentration camps, 1933-2006. It is located in the Pavelló de la República CRAI Library - University of Barcelona .
She died on 13 April 2019, at the age of 103.[7]

 
he Generalitat of Catalonia awarded her the Cross of St. George in 2005, and later she was chosen Catalan Person of the Year in 2006 for her defense of the memory of the more than 92,000 women who died in Ravensbrück. In 2006 she also received the Award for Alternative granted by the United and Alternative Left. On 29 October 2014, at the age of 99, the Barcelona City Council awarded Català the Gold Medal of Civic Merit, in recognition for her work to preserve historical memory, the fight against fascism, and the defense of women. In 2015, she received the Gold Medal of the Generalitat of Catalonia, for her struggle for justice and democratic freedom, the memory of those deported to Nazi death camps, and the defense of human rights.[8]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neus_Catal%C3%A0
Bibi Andersson, Swedish actress

Berit Elisabeth Andersson (11 November 1935 – 14 April 2019),[1] known professionally as Bibi Andersson (Swedish: [²bɪbːɪ ²anːdɛˌʂɔn]), was a Swedish actress who was best known for her frequent collaborations with the filmmaker Ingmar Bergman.


Andersson was born in Kungsholmen, Stockholm, the daughter of Karin (née Mansion), a social worker, and Josef Andersson, a businessman.[3][4][5]

Her first collaboration with Ingmar Bergman came in 1951,[6] when she participated in his production of an advertisement for the detergent Bris.[7] She also worked as an extra on film sets as a teenager, and studied acting at the Terserus Drama School and at the Royal Dramatic Theatre School (1954–1956).[3][4] She then joined the Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm, with which she was associated for 30 years.[citation needed]

In the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, Andersson starred in eleven pictures directed by Bergman, including The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries, Brink of Life, The Magician, The Passion of Anna, The Touch, and Persona.[6]


In 1963, Andersson won the Silver Bear for Best Actress at the 13th Berlin International Film Festival for her performance in Vilgot Sjöman's The Mistress.[8]

Her intense portrayal of a nurse in the 1966 film Persona led to an increase in the number of cinematic roles offered to her, and she appeared that same year alongside James Garner and Sidney Poitier in the violent western Duel at Diablo.[1] For her performance in Persona, she won the award for Best Actress at the 4th Guldbagge Awards.[9] More Bergman collaborations followed, and she also worked with John Huston (The Kremlin Letter, 1970)[10] and Robert Altman (Quintet, 1979).[11]

Andersson made her debut in American theatre in 1973 with a production of Erich Maria Remarque's Full Circle.[12] Her most famous American film is I Never Promised You a Rose Garden (1977), which also starred Kathleen Quinlan.[13]
In 1990, Andersson worked as a theatre director in Stockholm, directing several plays at Dramaten.[14] In the late 1980s and early 1990s, she worked primarily in television and as a theatre actress, working with Bergman again, and others. She was also a supervisor for the humanitarian project the Road to Sarajevo.[15]

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibi_Andersson
Talented and prolific science fiction/fantasy author.

Gene Rodman Wolfe (May 7, 1931 – April 14, 2019) was an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He was noted for his dense, allusive prose as well as the strong influence of his Catholic faith. He was a prolific short-story writer and novelist and won many science fiction and fantasy literary awards.

Wolfe is best known for his Book of the New Sun series (four volumes, 1980–83), the first part of his "Solar Cycle". In 1998, Locus magazine ranked it the third-best fantasy novel published before 1990 based on a poll of subscribers that considered it and several other series as single entries.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Wolfe

https://www.tor.com/2019/04/15/gene-wolf...1931-2019/
Classical pianist heavily recorded:



Jörg Demus (2 December 1928[citation needed] – 16 April 2019) was an Austrian pianist.

At the age of six, Demus received his first piano lessons. Five years later, at the age of 11, he entered the Vienna Academy of Music, studying piano and conducting. His debut as a pianist came when he was still a student: at the age of 14, Demus played in the Brahms-Saal for the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde.[2] He graduated in 1945, then 17 years old, after which he continued to study conducting with Josef Krips and Hans Swarowsky.[3] Demus studied in Paris with Yves Nat from 1951 to 1953. In 1953 he studied interpretation further with Wilhelm Kempff, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli, and Edwin Fischer, and attended master classes with Walter Gieseking.[3] In 1956 he won first prize at the Ferruccio Busoni International Piano Competition.[4]

He was active as a Lied accompanist and a chamber music partner, appearing with such singers as Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Elly Ameling and Peter Schreier and string players like Josef Suk and Antonio Janigro. He performed widely as a soloist both on modern and on historical instruments and collaborated with Paul Badura-Skoda on the concert platform and in a book on the interpretation of Beethoven's piano sonatas. In 1972 he toured southern Africa with sold out and acclaimed performances in all the major cities.[5] In 1974, Demus performed for the Peabody Mason Concert series in Boston.[6] Demus played Romantic works quite often: among his recordings are sets of the complete piano works of Schumann; he recorded also the complete piano works of Debussy.[citation needed]

Among his students was the pianist Domenico Piccichè.[citation needed]
Demus was also a composer, chiefly of music for the piano, chamber music and songs, composing in a generally conservative style. Recorded works include Schubert Impromptus on the Deutsche Grammophon label; and a recital of chamber music for cello and piano taking their inspiration from the poems of Paul Verlaine and the later music of Robert Schumann.[7]

He received the Mozart Medal of the Mozartgemeinde Wien [de] in 1979.
He died on 16 April 2019, aged 90.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B6rg_Demus
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