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I found this in the old Obituaries thread in the T4T forum from 2012. As I discussed the death of Davy Jones at age 66 from what sounded like an old man's disease which elicits more sympathy from me than does wrecking one's body with drugs, booze, or extreme obesity.


pbrower2a Wrote:I have plenty of euphemisms for my age -- as in "It's a young 56" that I can justify because I don't have diabetes or liver problems -- and I still have good knees. I'd like to lose about as many pounds as I have years, and I would rather be around people who act and think young. A gout attack can remind me of how old I am and compel me to use handicap parking. Without gout, I can do some hiking and swimming. I'd rather be where I can do both.

But I know how old I am when I expose how much a Boomer I am through my knowledge, my memories (I can remember John F. Kennedy!), and my tastes in music (classical -- and I miss the large selections of CDs of classical music that used to be accessible) and especially movies. I expose my age when I find that the mass culture no longer fits me. I also know that advertisers have little use for me unless it is for items and experiences for the elderly.

But just as 16 and 16 and is short of adulthood even for someone mature for the age, 56 is 56 and is clearly no longer young even if one is intellectually alert and in generally good health. Could I be a good influence upon teenagers? Almost certainly. But don't expect me to be so much a pal as a mentor. If I should ever marry a woman with children I might share A Clockwork Orange with her but keep it under lock and key because it is an R-rated movie... and Meet Me in St. Louis with her and the kids.

Addendum, as one might expect after four years

Update: I have lost 20 of those pounds.

I have also lost lots of old relatives, too. I wonder if I am getting obsolete.

....Maybe I need to develop the knack for code-switching when referring to time. Introducing the past to people who might learn from it isn't all bad. That is the most benign way to preserve the past. Preserving old neuroses, bigotry, sentimentality, and corrupt institutions is hurtful, and such does more to hurt the young and ultimately alienate them from the old than even difference.
As an early-wave Millie who just turned 30 I am feeling like I close to completely losing my ability to relate to today's teens, I can definitely "feel" on a visceral level that the cusp of a new generation is approaching adulthood.

We Millennials are not the "kids", anymore.
(05-15-2016, 01:05 PM)Odin Wrote: [ -> ]As an early-wave Millie who just turned 30 I am feeling like I close to completely losing my ability to relate to today's teens, I can definitely "feel" on a visceral level that the cusp of a new generation is approaching adulthood.

We Millennials are not the "kids", anymore.

Getting detached from the youth culture? I thought that that was a Boomer phenomenon around 1980 when the pop culture went from being made for Boomers to being made for Generation X. So that is nothing new.

So I learned something. Maybe I'm not so old, after all.
(05-15-2016, 06:13 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-15-2016, 01:05 PM)Odin Wrote: [ -> ]As an early-wave Millie who just turned 30 I am feeling like I close to completely losing my ability to relate to today's teens, I can definitely "feel" on a visceral level that the cusp of a new generation is approaching adulthood.

We Millennials are not the "kids", anymore.

Getting detached from the youth culture? I thought that that was a Boomer phenomenon around 1980 when the pop culture went from being made for Boomers to being made for Generation X. So that is nothing new.

So I learned something. Maybe I'm not so old, after all.

No it is not a boomer phenomenon. It affects all generations when they hit a certain age I am sure. As a 31 year old millie I feel Odin's (Taylor's) pain. I have felt it for some time actually. I miss my 90's and early 2000's.
The rock stars, once expressions of youthful vitality, are themselves getting old.

Retrieved from the old Obituaries forum on the T4T site,

(Yes, this is my material):

Those who can perform or create are as hooked on what they do as an addict is on heroin. As with heroin, performance and creation become the cornerstone of life. The obvious difference is that heroin destroys. Creation and performance are possible means of achieving what Abraham Maslow calls self-actualization. (To be sure, artists who live miserable lives because they are miserable people, like Richard Wagner and Vincent Van Gogh, never achieve self-actualization). It may be a different activity, but last week I saw a performance of Il Trovatore on PBS. I had never seen such happy people in my life even if the opera is a tragedy.

Performing in the St. Joseph County Fair is still performing, even if it is in St. Joseph County, Michigan. It offers the same endorphins. Finding cheering crowds who travel from tens of miles away gives much the same effect as performing in Madison Square Garden.

As we all know, the early rock stars are genuinely old. But if they have avoided the STDs, alcoholism, and drug overdoses that have killed many, they can perform until their health gives out. Stage performance is a healthy activity, whether it is playing rock on an electric guitar or conducting a symphony orchestra. Some of them have followed the pattern of GIs as late-wave Silent and early-wave Boomers, staying fit and active as long as possible. Deaths of David Bowie and Glenn Frye notwithstanding, some of the early-wave rockers could live into their nineties.

So avoid drugs, alcoholism, and reckless sex, and the physical activity is better for one than the sedentary non-activity of some obese checker-cashier whose employer accommodates an ursine weight (but without the ursine agility and strength) with a chair or stool built to accommodate the weight of a bear. A high-fat diet and a sedentary life can kill as effectively as drugs, alcoholism, and reckless sex. Ask me about my late 500-pound cousin who died at age 46.
It isn't just you Odin. I experienced much the same thing around 2000. Of course joining the military might have had something to do with that.
(05-16-2016, 07:50 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]There's nothing like Xers getting old to make the aging Boomers feel really, really old!

This year, Ferris Bueller (well at least the guy who played him, Matthew Broderick) turned .... 54! Exclamation Exclamation

hahaha go on, rub it in. Loving it! Big Grin
(05-15-2016, 06:13 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-15-2016, 01:05 PM)Odin Wrote: [ -> ]As an early-wave Millie who just turned 30 I am feeling like I close to completely losing my ability to relate to today's teens, I can definitely "feel" on a visceral level that the cusp of a new generation is approaching adulthood.

We Millennials are not the "kids", anymore.

Getting detached from the youth culture? I thought that that was a Boomer phenomenon around 1980 when the pop culture went from being made for Boomers to being made for Generation X. So that is nothing new.

So I learned something. Maybe I'm not so old, after all.

Today I definitely feel detached from the youth culture, which today is entirely different from Generation X. Today it is the Smartphone Culture, and those younger than 40 especially would be like fish out of water without their technology. I don't feel that today's society could ever cope with a 1930s style Great Depression. Do any of you?
(05-16-2016, 09:15 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]The rock stars, once expressions of youthful vitality, are themselves getting old.

Retrieved from the old Obituaries forum on the T4T site,

(Yes, this is my material):

Those who can perform or create are as hooked on what they do as an addict is on heroin. As with heroin, performance and creation become the cornerstone of life. The obvious difference is that heroin destroys. Creation and performance are possible means of achieving what Abraham Maslow calls self-actualization. (To be sure, artists who live miserable lives because they are miserable people, like Richard Wagner and Vincent Van Gogh, never achieve self-actualization). It may be a different activity, but last week I saw a performance of Il Trovatore on PBS. I had never seen such happy people in my life even if the opera is a tragedy.

Performing in the St. Joseph County Fair is still performing, even if it is in St. Joseph County, Michigan. It offers the same endorphins. Finding cheering crowds who travel from tens of miles away gives much the same effect as performing in Madison Square Garden.

As we all know, the early rock stars are genuinely old. But if they have avoided the STDs, alcoholism, and drug overdoses that have killed many, they can perform until their health gives out. Stage performance is a healthy activity, whether it is playing rock on an electric guitar or conducting a symphony orchestra. Some of them have followed the pattern of GIs as late-wave Silent and early-wave Boomers, staying fit and active as long as possible. Deaths of David Bowie and Glenn Frye notwithstanding, some of the early-wave rockers could live into their nineties.

So avoid drugs, alcoholism, and reckless sex, and the physical activity is better for one than the sedentary non-activity of some obese checker-cashier whose employer accommodates an ursine weight (but without the ursine agility and strength) with a chair or stool built to accommodate the weight of a bear. A high-fat diet and a sedentary life can kill as effectively as drugs, alcoholism, and reckless sex. Ask me about my late 500-pound cousin who died at age 46.

Speaking of aging rockers, last night I went to a concert featuring two different acts performing nothing but Bob Dylan songs (He turns 75 on Tuesday). Could anybody have predicted that now, in the twilight of his career, he would release a CD filled with 1940s era standards? Not in my wildest dreams could I have predicted that.
(05-22-2016, 02:51 PM)beechnut79 Wrote: [ -> ]Today I definitely feel detached from the youth culture, which today is entirely different from Generation X. Today it is the Smartphone Culture, and those younger than 40 especially would be like fish out of water without their technology.

That is only partially true. But then again I kind of insist that my kid learns gardening, hunting and fishing along with the computer programing.

Quote: I don't feel that today's society could ever cope with a 1930s style Great Depression. Do any of you?

A large percentage of the rural population could deal with a Great Depression just fine. It is the urbanized twits that worry me. They'd starve to death in about a week.
(09-22-2016, 07:19 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]Had a get together with Boomer friends a few days ago. Were looking at old pictures from the 1980s. Yet another reminder ... today's 67 year old was all of 36 back when I was a brand new grad in the mid 80s. That 67 year old was a just becoming senior employee, mentoring me, the wet behind the ears early 20-something. Meanwhile, the oldest Millies are now that just becoming senior employee.

Arrrrrgggggh!

Tell it to stop! Wink

Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.
(09-22-2016, 07:27 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:19 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]Had a get together with Boomer friends a few days ago. Were looking at old pictures from the 1980s. Yet another reminder ... today's 67 year old was all of 36 back when I was a brand new grad in the mid 80s. That 67 year old was a just becoming senior employee, mentoring me, the wet behind the ears early 20-something. Meanwhile, the oldest Millies are now that just becoming senior employee.

Arrrrrgggggh!

Tell it to stop! Wink

Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.

The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
(09-23-2016, 12:29 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:27 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:19 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]Had a get together with Boomer friends a few days ago. Were looking at old pictures from the 1980s. Yet another reminder ... today's 67 year old was all of 36 back when I was a brand new grad in the mid 80s. That 67 year old was a just becoming senior employee, mentoring me, the wet behind the ears early 20-something. Meanwhile, the oldest Millies are now that just becoming senior employee.

Arrrrrgggggh!

Tell it to stop! Wink

Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.

The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
Well I think some xers who were not expecting the crash (and here, the earthquakes for ALL generations that were not well off) who had kids especially are suffering. Boomers who recklessly spend what they do not have who thought times would always be great too. Like my own mother. But yeah my generation was lied to. Unprepared, young, naive and so it is near impossible to make a start in life. Too bloody hard to get into the work force, saddled with debt from degrees we were told would take us somewhere. Now we need the experience and how are we to get that if no one will take us on? It is also so expensive to live anywhere these days. Can we afford cars, houses? Nope. Then older folk start on us for staying at home. Smdh.
(09-23-2016, 12:41 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:29 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:27 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:19 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]Had a get together with Boomer friends a few days ago. Were looking at old pictures from the 1980s. Yet another reminder ... today's 67 year old was all of 36 back when I was a brand new grad in the mid 80s. That 67 year old was a just becoming senior employee, mentoring me, the wet behind the ears early 20-something. Meanwhile, the oldest Millies are now that just becoming senior employee.

Arrrrrgggggh!

Tell it to stop! Wink

Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.

The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
Well I think some xers who were not expecting the crash (and here, the earthquakes for ALL generations that were not well off) who had kids especially are suffering. Boomers who recklessly spend what they do not have who thought times would always be great too. Like my own mother. But yeah my generation was lied to. Unprepared, young, naive and so it is near impossible to make a start in life. Too bloody hard to get into the work force, saddled with debt from degrees we were told would take us somewhere. Now we need the experience and how are we to get that if no one will take us on? It is also so expensive to live anywhere these days. Can we afford cars, houses? Nope. Then older folk start on us for staying at home. Smdh.

The Boomers and Silents had decades in the US to deal with the obvious fiscal problems and on the whole chose to do nothing but make it worse.  Things were great for the Silent generation and they tended to be non-entities and so expecting them to take the lead was unreasonable.  Ron Paul was the exception but as you know, very few Boomers or Silents were listening.  The Silent Generation were the least likely people to take a risk and break out of the usual patterns.
(09-23-2016, 12:53 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:41 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:29 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:27 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:19 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: [ -> ]Had a get together with Boomer friends a few days ago. Were looking at old pictures from the 1980s. Yet another reminder ... today's 67 year old was all of 36 back when I was a brand new grad in the mid 80s. That 67 year old was a just becoming senior employee, mentoring me, the wet behind the ears early 20-something. Meanwhile, the oldest Millies are now that just becoming senior employee.

Arrrrrgggggh!

Tell it to stop! Wink

Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.

The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
Well I think some xers who were not expecting the crash (and here, the earthquakes for ALL generations that were not well off) who had kids especially are suffering. Boomers who recklessly spend what they do not have who thought times would always be great too. Like my own mother. But yeah my generation was lied to. Unprepared, young, naive and so it is near impossible to make a start in life. Too bloody hard to get into the work force, saddled with debt from degrees we were told would take us somewhere. Now we need the experience and how are we to get that if no one will take us on? It is also so expensive to live anywhere these days. Can we afford cars, houses? Nope. Then older folk start on us for staying at home. Smdh.

The Boomers and Silents had decades in the US to deal with the obvious fiscal problems and on the whole chose to do nothing but make it worse.  Things were great for the Silent generation and they tended to be non-entities and so expecting them to take the lead was unreasonable.  Ron Paul was the exception but as you know, very few Boomers or Silents were listening.  The Silent Generation were the least likely people to take a risk and break out of the usual patterns.

For greed I assume?
(09-23-2016, 01:01 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:53 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:41 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:29 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-22-2016, 07:27 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]Well those fortunate enough to have jobs that is. Here in christchurch most are struggling. I mean heck my best mate who was born th same year as me has had her 60 year old mother board with her because rent is too high. They are making off the fact so many have been left homeless after the earthquakes and great recession. Employers are running employees ragged and taking away their rights. They can fire you at the drop of a hat now and get away with it. Meanwhile boomers here talk about days in their youth when jobs were abundant, more rights, and they did not even need a cv. I have a degree, massive debt from student loan to get a job and guess what? No jobs! Heck even with the few out there my degree is not enough. I need experience first. So back to school i go to specialize in something and get help to get that experience because they will just not hire you anymore without prior experience. Boomers say that was not an issue back in their day. Pisses me right off.

The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
Well I think some xers who were not expecting the crash (and here, the earthquakes for ALL generations that were not well off) who had kids especially are suffering. Boomers who recklessly spend what they do not have who thought times would always be great too. Like my own mother. But yeah my generation was lied to. Unprepared, young, naive and so it is near impossible to make a start in life. Too bloody hard to get into the work force, saddled with debt from degrees we were told would take us somewhere. Now we need the experience and how are we to get that if no one will take us on? It is also so expensive to live anywhere these days. Can we afford cars, houses? Nope. Then older folk start on us for staying at home. Smdh.

The Boomers and Silents had decades in the US to deal with the obvious fiscal problems and on the whole chose to do nothing but make it worse.  Things were great for the Silent generation and they tended to be non-entities and so expecting them to take the lead was unreasonable.  Ron Paul was the exception but as you know, very few Boomers or Silents were listening.  The Silent Generation were the least likely people to take a risk and break out of the usual patterns.

For greed I assume?

Yes, but the Boomers and Silent Generation have been assuming that what was would always be.  That you could tax, borrow and spend forever with no bad consequences.  They made the same assumptions in their personal lives as well and now the chickens appear to be coming home to roost.

The GIs are pretty much gone and the Silent Generation is going so they probably won't have to worry too much about it.  Most of the Boomers literally can not face the reality of the situation.  Consider the reactions I get when I point out that government must reduce their spending on both defense and entitlements.  Most of the Boomers literally can not accept that they to must suffer the consequences of their decisions.  They expect Generation X and the Millies keep all of the unrealistic promises.  You already know that this is not possible.  The last eight years of money printing are a last futile attempt to delay the inevitable which will create an even bigger crisis.
(09-23-2016, 01:50 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 01:01 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:53 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:41 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 12:29 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]The only advantage Generation X has over the Millies is that we knew that we were screwed and no one gave a shit about that.  That gave many Xers time to compensate for the circumstances.  Millies are going to have a really rough time of it, possibly even worse.
Well I think some xers who were not expecting the crash (and here, the earthquakes for ALL generations that were not well off) who had kids especially are suffering. Boomers who recklessly spend what they do not have who thought times would always be great too. Like my own mother. But yeah my generation was lied to. Unprepared, young, naive and so it is near impossible to make a start in life. Too bloody hard to get into the work force, saddled with debt from degrees we were told would take us somewhere. Now we need the experience and how are we to get that if no one will take us on? It is also so expensive to live anywhere these days. Can we afford cars, houses? Nope. Then older folk start on us for staying at home. Smdh.

The Boomers and Silents had decades in the US to deal with the obvious fiscal problems and on the whole chose to do nothing but make it worse.  Things were great for the Silent generation and they tended to be non-entities and so expecting them to take the lead was unreasonable.  Ron Paul was the exception but as you know, very few Boomers or Silents were listening.  The Silent Generation were the least likely people to take a risk and break out of the usual patterns.

For greed I assume?

Yes, but the Boomers and Silent Generation have been assuming that what was would always be.  That you could tax, borrow and spend forever with no bad consequences.  They made the same assumptions in their personal lives as well and now the chickens appear to be coming home to roost.

The GIs are pretty much gone and the Silent Generation is going so they probably won't have to worry too much about it.  Most of the Boomers literally can not face the reality of the situation.  Consider the reactions I get when I point out that government must reduce their spending on both defense and entitlements.  Most of the Boomers literally can not accept that they to must suffer the consequences of their decisions.  They expect Generation X and the Millies keep all of the unrealistic promises.  You already know that this is not possible.  The last eight years of money printing are a last futile attempt to delay the inevitable which will create an even bigger crisis.

That makes sense. I just have to look to my mother to see that mistake. The thought that you can spend and be reckless with no ill consequence. Her error has trapped us both with her debt for if i leave, she starves. Not that I could anyway with prices being so high. I am grateful I have learned from seeing my elders mistakes at a young age however. I really needed that lesson so not to repeat it. The majority of boomers were not blessed with that lesson on a massive scale. Nothing lasts forever. Things can change in an instant. Earthquakes, great recession, death, city in ruin, suburbs in ruin, no food, no water, no power, no house, no job but a whole lot of debt (my mothers) that needs paying. What a lesson all in one go but boy i wizened up fast.
(09-23-2016, 02:02 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]That makes sense. I just have to look to my mother to see that mistake. The thought that you can spend and be reckless with no ill consequence. Her error has trapped us both with her debt for if i leave, she starves. Not that I could anyway with prices being so high. I am grateful I have learned from seeing my elders mistakes at a young age however. I really needed that lesson so not to repeat it. The majority of boomers were not blessed with that lesson on a massive scale. Nothing lasts forever. Things can change in an instant. Earthquakes, great recession, death, city in ruin, suburbs in ruin, no food, no water, no power, no house, no job but a whole lot of debt (my mothers) that needs paying. What a lesson all in one go but boy i wizened up fast.

Eric the Obtuse is the archetype of unwilling to accept reality.  There is the astrology and new age thing that he has been on since the sixties that never has worked.  You have been probably reading his other stuff where he believes that Clinton is going to be president.  Scott Adams disagrees with this assessment and I think he is right.  Make sure to look at the video and tell me what you think, particularly about the mood.

Millies may have their issues but like the GIs they tend to adapt to changed circumstances.  This will serve them well in the coming years.
(09-23-2016, 02:20 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 02:02 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]That makes sense. I just have to look to my mother to see that mistake. The thought that you can spend and be reckless with no ill consequence. Her error has trapped us both with her debt for if i leave, she starves. Not that I could anyway with prices being so high. I am grateful I have learned from seeing my elders mistakes at a young age however. I really needed that lesson so not to repeat it. The majority of boomers were not blessed with that lesson on a massive scale. Nothing lasts forever. Things can change in an instant. Earthquakes, great recession, death, city in ruin, suburbs in ruin, no food, no water, no power, no house, no job but a whole lot of debt (my mothers) that needs paying. What a lesson all in one go but boy i wizened up fast.

Eric the Obtuse is the archetype of unwilling to accept reality.  There is the astrology and new age thing that he has been on since the sixties that never has worked.  You have been probably reading his other stuff where he believes that Clinton is going to be president.  Scott Adams disagrees with this assessment and I think he is right.  Make sure to look at the video and tell me what you think, particularly about the mood.

Millies may have their issues but like the GIs they tend to adapt to changed circumstances.  This will serve them well in the coming years.
True about Eric. It amazes me really and I wonder what made him that way. Yes he is predicting Clinton will win. I have my doubts of course. I refrain from being certain of results before they are in but i sense she will not win for some reason. But do not take that too seriously. People want something different and the time is right for something new and the time is right for someone like Trump or Bernie who are something indeed very new who both claim to have the answer. We know what to expect from a Clinton. So that is why I sense she has a hard road ahead if she expects to win. But I would rather sit and wait for the results of the election as i am no prophet and I do not have the ego to claim to know the answer well in advance neither.


Well being grounded in reality is vital to surviving and trying to thrive in a terrible environment. It is better together I have found. Being part of a millie collective to pick up the pieces of a ruined city keeps up spirits and likewise with collective businesses we are setting up to help each other in the business world. Here, we have the chance to rebuild a whole city and rebuild a nice, helpful community in civic groups and the business world. Both which I am part of with the SVA and the Film Cooperative.

I will watch your video.
(09-23-2016, 02:36 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 02:20 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-23-2016, 02:02 AM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]That makes sense. I just have to look to my mother to see that mistake. The thought that you can spend and be reckless with no ill consequence. Her error has trapped us both with her debt for if i leave, she starves. Not that I could anyway with prices being so high. I am grateful I have learned from seeing my elders mistakes at a young age however. I really needed that lesson so not to repeat it. The majority of boomers were not blessed with that lesson on a massive scale. Nothing lasts forever. Things can change in an instant. Earthquakes, great recession, death, city in ruin, suburbs in ruin, no food, no water, no power, no house, no job but a whole lot of debt (my mothers) that needs paying. What a lesson all in one go but boy i wizened up fast.

Eric the Obtuse is the archetype of unwilling to accept reality.  There is the astrology and new age thing that he has been on since the sixties that never has worked.  You have been probably reading his other stuff where he believes that Clinton is going to be president.  Scott Adams disagrees with this assessment and I think he is right.  Make sure to look at the video and tell me what you think, particularly about the mood.

Millies may have their issues but like the GIs they tend to adapt to changed circumstances.  This will serve them well in the coming years.
True about Eric. It amazes me really and I wonder what made him that way. Yes he is predicting Clinton will win. I have my doubts of course. I refrain from being certain of results before they are in but i sense she will not win for some reason. But do not take that too seriously. People want something different and the time is right for something new and the time is right for someone like Trump or Bernie who are something indeed very new who both claim to have the answer. We know what to expect from a Clinton. So that is why I sense she has a hard road ahead if she expects to win. But I would rather sit and wait for the results of the election as i am no prophet and I do not have the ego to claim to know the answer well in advance neither.


Well being grounded in reality is vital to surviving and trying to thrive in a terrible environment. It is better together I have found. Being part of a millie collective to pick up the pieces of a ruined city keeps up spirits and likewise with collective businesses we are setting up to help each other in the business world. Here, we have the chance to rebuild a whole city and rebuild a nice, helpful community in civic groups and the business world. Both which I am part of with the SVA and the Film Cooperative.

I will watch your video.

Its a short video fortunately and it is a link from the Scott Adams blog which is also short.  I tend to agree with him but you are right there are no guarantees.

I don't know where the attitude comes from but I do know it is endemic among the Boomers.  Silents tended believe that if you just obeyed the rules, thinking was optional, and everything would be fine.

Xers tend to work in much smaller groups.  It goes with the paranoia and trust issues.
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