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Obituaries - Printable Version

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RE: Obituaries - beechnut79 - 09-28-2017

Somehow nobody thought of this, but back on September 8 two stars of country music passed on the very same day. Troy Gentry, 50, was killed in a helicopter crash. Along with Eddie Montgomery he was one-half of the acclaimed country-rock duo Montgomery Gentry.

Don Williams passed the very same day at age 78. He was known as the Gentle Giant due to his laid-back delivery of a song. A few of his hits included "I Believe in You", "You're My Best Friend" and "Good Ol' Boys Like Me". He also appeared in a couple of Burt Reynolds movies. He begain his music career as part of the folk-pop trio the Pozo Seco Singers who had three appearances in the national Top 40 but never made it into the Top 30.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 09-29-2017

(09-28-2017, 06:22 PM)beechnut79 Wrote: Hef was indeed the Godfather of the Sexual Revolution. His passing seems to mark the final nail in that revolution's coffin. There are many who feel that we are unlikely to have another such revolution even if a proof-positive cure for AIDS is found. Yet statisically we have a greater risk of being killed on the highways.

He filled a need. Maybe the Pill did more by allowing sex without procreation, and thus the recreational sex that many still consider a great affront to "nature" or the Divine Presence.

The centerfolds were slick art. Yes, the unclothed female body can be beautiful, as is well established in painting and art photography. Hef was more artist than pornographer; one felt less guilty with Playboy than with cheap imitators. I won't go into great details about how he exposed or did not expose what shocked prudes of the time, but I can say this: if you looked at the parts of the female anatomy usually covered in underwear on his centerfold model, you also looked at her face. Did he put more attention on the female's hairdo? That may have separated him from the much-despised pornographers of the time.

Playboy sought to have some intellectual attraction. Its articles were often worth reading. After all, sex did not have to be stupid or disgusting, let alone solely for reproduction. Was he a male-chauvinist pig? Sure. He sold most men an unattainable fantasy. The harm isn't that men recognize the female body as the beauty that it is; the problem is that Hefner expanded a culture in which female youth was a commodity for exploitation by older men. Thus, go ahead and marry your high-school or college sweetheart, but when she loses her attractiveness marry someone else's potential college or high-school sweetheart around age 40. Then when you are 60 or so...


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-01-2017

Monte Halparin, OC OM (August 25, 1921 – September 30, 2017), better known by the stage name Monty Hall, was a Canadian-American game show host and producer, best known as the long-running host of Let's Make a Deal.[1]


Hall started his career in Winnipeg at CKRC radio, moving to Toronto in 1946 where he found a job with radio station CHUM, where his name was shortened to Hall. Early in his career, Hall hosted game shows such as Bingo at Home on WABD-TV and guest-hosted more established game shows such as Strike It Rich on CBS and Twenty-One on NBC.[citation needed] He was the host/performer of two local New York City TV film shows for children: Cowboy Theater for WRCA (Channel 4) in 1956 and Fun In the Morning for WNEW (Ch. 5) in the early 1960s. From 1956–60, along with NBC Radio newsman Morgan Beatty, Hall co-hosted the Saturday night segment of the NBC Radio Network weekend program Monitor from 8 p.m. until midnight (EST).[6] At least two recordings of Hall on Monitor are known to exist.[7]
[/url]
Hall was a radio analyst for the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Rangers]New York Rangers
of the National Hockey League during the 1959–60 season.[8]
He succeeded Jack Narz as host of a game show called Video Village, which ran from 1960 to 1962 on CBS. From 1961-62, Hall hosted its spinoff, Video Village Junior, which featured children. After moving to Southern California, Hall became the host of the game show Let's Make a Deal, which he developed and produced with partner Stefan Hatos. Let's Make a Deal aired on NBC daytime from December 30, 1963, to December 27, 1968, and on ABC daytime from December 30, 1968 until July 9, 1976, along with two prime time runs. It aired in syndication from 1971–77, from 1980–81, from 1984–86, and again on NBC briefly from 1990–91, replacing Bob Hilton, who had been dismissed. He was producer or executive producer of the show through most of its runs. During the show's initial run, Hall appeared alongside model Carol Merrill and announcer Jay Stewart.[citation needed]

Besides Let's Make a Deal, the game show Split Second, which originally ran on ABC from 1972-75 with Tom Kennedy as host, and again in syndication in 1987 with Hall hosting that version, was the only other successful program from Hatos-Hall Productions. Other game shows from Hatos's and Hall's production company included Chain Letter in 1966; a revival of the venerable 1950s-era panel quiz, Masquerade Party in 1974; 3 for the Money in 1975; It's Anybody's Guess in 1977, which reunited Let's Make a Deal announcer Jay Stewart with Hall, who also hosted the show, and the Canadian-based The Joke's on Us in 1983. Hall filled in as guest host on several daytime game shows while Let's Make a Deal was on NBC, most notably What's This Song? and PDQ.[citation needed]

In 1979, Hall hosted the only game show since Video Village which he did not produce, Goodson-Todman's All-New Beat the Clock. (His announcer was Jack Narz, whom he had replaced as host of Video Village.) He appeared as himself on "The Promise Ring" episode of That '70s Show in 2001. He played the host of a beauty pageant who schemed to become "the world's most powerful game show host" in the Disney animated series American Dragon: Jake Long.[citation needed] He appeared on GSN Live on March 14, 2008,[citation needed] and hosted a game of Let's Make a Deal for Good Morning America on August 18, 2008, as part of Game Show Reunion week.[citation needed]

In summer 2009, CBS announced that it was reviving Let's Make a Deal on its daytime schedule. The show premiered on October 5, 2009, with Wayne Brady as host. Hall is credited as "Creative Consultant," and as co-creator of the format (with Stefan Hatos). Hatos/Hall Productions is credited as co-production company (with FremantleMedia).[9]



More here.


RE: Obituaries - Marypoza - 10-02-2017

RlP Tom Petty :Sad

I am sooooo bummed....

Of all the Wilburys l think only only Ringo is left. First Roy Orbison dies, then George Harrison, & now Tom Petty. Oh wait & Dylan. Dylan & Ringo are still alive


RE: Obituaries - Eric the Green - 10-02-2017

(10-02-2017, 07:10 PM)Marypoza Wrote: RlP Tom Petty :Sad

I am sooooo bummed....

Of all the Wilburys l think only only Ringo is left. First Roy Orbison dies, then George Harrison, & now Tom Petty. Oh wait & Dylan. Dylan & Riingo are still alive

Petty suffered cardiac arrest on October 1, 2017; while some media outlets reported his death on October 2, the reports have been retracted as not confirmed.[4] (wikipedia)

Hmmmmm

"clinging to life"
http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music/tom-petty-dead-66-cardiac-arrest-report-article-1.3536756


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-03-2017

Death verified now.


RE: Obituaries - AarG - 10-03-2017

(10-02-2017, 07:10 PM)Marypoza Wrote: RlP Tom Petty :Sad

I am sooooo bummed....

Of all the Wilburys l think only only Ringo is left. First Roy Orbison dies, then George Harrison, & now Tom Petty. Oh wait & Dylan. Dylan & Ringo are still alive

Jeff Lynne is also still around, not to minimize.


RE: Obituaries - Eric the Green - 10-03-2017

Did Tom Petty's Rocker Lifestyle Shorten His Life?

By Charlotte Libov | Tuesday, 03 Oct 2017 09:37 AM

Image: Did Tom Petty's Rocker Lifestyle Shorten His Life?
(Copyright AP)

[Image: GetFile.aspx?guid=c514bd70-c329-4f20-bf9...desize=600]

Tom Petty’s punishing lifestyle on the road probably contributed to the legendary rocker’s early death, a top heart-health expert says. “The surest way to shorten your life is to be a rock star,” renowned cardiologist Dr. Chauncey Crandall tells Newsmax Health.

The 66-year-old front man for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers died after suffering a cardiac arrest and was found unconscious at his Malibu home on Sunday. He was rush to UCLA Santa Monica Hospital and temporarily placed on life support, which was withdrawn Monday, according to reports.

His death at 11:40 p.m. E.S.T. came just days after he and his band had wrapped up three days of concerts at the Hollywood Bowl.

They had launched the tour earlier this year to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the band’s first record hitting the stores, playing multiple dates throughout the U.S., prior to their California stops. They were slated to take a break for a few weeks, and then head to New York City.

The stress of touring, performance pressure, and other challenges older rock musicians face can take a toll on the heart and overall health, Crandall notes.

“You’re on the road, eating bad food, exposed to cigarette smoke, and keeping late hours. It’s a punishing way of life, especially for someone of Petty’s age,” says Crandall, chief of the cardiac transplant program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Center in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

“He was like a powder keg, ready to go off.”

Although a cardiac arrest, which causes the heart to stop beating, isn’t always caused by a heart attack, it’s a likely scenario, says Crandall, author of the Heart Health Report newsletter.

It isn’t known if Petty had been suffering from any heart problems, but, in his 2015 biography, the singer revealed he had been a heroin addict in the 1990s.

According to Crandall, such drug use, even years ago, could very well have played a role in Petty’s death as well.

“Even if someone gives up a drug like heroin years earlier, it still could have damaged his heart’s coronary arteries, setting the stage for a heart attack, just like previous cigarette smoking causes lung cancer,” adds Crandall.

Last year, Petty told Rolling Stone the band’s 40th anniversary tour would likely be its last.

"I'd be lying if I didn't say I was thinking this might be the last big one," he said. "We're all on the backside of our sixties. I have a granddaughter now I'd like to see as much as I can. I don't want to spend my life on the road."

Petty released 13 albums with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and three solo albums. He also took part in the 1980s supergroup the Traveling Wilburys with Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison and Jeff Lynne.

© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-03-2017

On the other side, classical musicians (except for French horn players -- it's a beautiful instrument but brutal on lungs) can live very long lives. It may be hard to believe, but Itzhak Perlman, who must have had as punishing a schedule as any rock star at one time, seems very healthy -- at 72. And he had polio.

Classical conductors are famous for long lives. Sure, there are accidents (Guido Cantelli, air crash; Istvan Kertesz, drowning) .. but even Bernstein lived into his seventies despite being gay and a smoker. Neville Marriner recently died at age 93. Toscanini died just short of age 90.

Fritz Reiner, Colin Davis, Georg Solti, Claudio Abbado, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Charles Mackerras, Thomas Beecham, Bruno Walter, Karl Boehm, and Herbert von Karajan reached their eighties. Bernard Haitink is 88, and Seijo Ozawa is in his 80s. Leopold Stokowski barely missed being a centenarian. Want to live a long life, and have the choice of any career? Be a symphony conductor. I am not saying that that is a choice for many people. Neither is being a rock star.

Concert pianists, violinists, and cellists? We have plenty of examples of octogenarians and nonagenarians. Horowitz, Serkin, Rubinstein... that's pianists. Don't forget harpsichordists, among which I can count Wanda Landowska, Gustav Leonhart, and some Czech harpsichordist whose name you can easily recover.

Do classical musicians take better care of themselves? Maybe. Maybe being well rested before a concert is a necessity. Junk food may not be part of the tour (although most of these performers lived before junk food was common).


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-03-2017

Jalal Talabani (Kurdish: جەلال تاڵەبانی Celal Tallebanî, Arabic: جلال طالباني‎‎ Jalāl Ṭālabānī;12 November 1933 – 3 October 2017)[2] was an Iraqi Kurdish politician who served as the sixth President of Iraq from 2005 to 2014, as well as the President of the Governing Council of Iraq (39th Prime Minister of Iraq). He was the first non-Arab president of Iraq, although Abdul Karim Qasim was of partial Kurdish heritage.[3] He is known as "Mam Jalal" meaning "uncle Jalal" among Kurdish people.

Talabani is the founder and had been secretary general of one of the main Kurdish political parties, the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK). He was a prominent member of the Interim Iraq Governing Council, which was established following the overthrow of the Saddam Hussein regime by the invasion of Iraq in 2003. Talabani was an advocate for Kurdish rights and democracy in Iraq for more than 50 years. Apart from his native Kurdish, Talabani was fluent in Arabic, Persian, and English.

When in September 1961, the Kurdish uprising for the rights of the Kurds in northern Iraq was declared against the Baghdad government of Abdul Karim Qassem, Talabani took charge of the Kirkuk and Silemani battle fronts and organized and led separatist movements in Mawat, Rezan and the Karadagh regions. In March 1962, he led a coordinated offensive that brought about the liberation of the district of Sharbazher from Iraqi government forces. When not engaged in fighting in the early and mid-1960s, Talabani undertook numerous diplomatic missions, representing the Kurdish leadership at meetings in Europe and the Middle East.

The Kurdish separatist movement collapsed in March 1975, after Iran ended their support in exchange for a border agreement with Iraq. This agreement was the 1975 Algiers Agreement, where Iraq gave up claims to the Shatt al-Arab (Arvand Rūd) waterway and Khuzestan, which later became the basis for the Iran–Iraq War. Believing it was time to give a new direction to the Kurdish separatists and to the Kurdish society, Talabani, with a group of Kurdish intellectuals and activists, founded the Kurdish Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (Yekiaiti Nishtimani Kurdistan). In 1976, he began organizing an armed campaign for Kurdish independence inside Iraqi Kurdistan. During the 1980s, Talabani sided with Iran and led a Kurdish struggle from bases inside Iraq until the crackdown against Kurdish separatists from 1987 to 1988.

In 1991, he helped inspire a renewed effort for Kurdish independence. He negotiated a ceasefire with the Iraqi Ba'athist government that saved the lives of many Kurds and worked closely with the United States, United Kingdom, France and other countries to set up the safe haven in Iraqi Kurdistan. In 1992 the Kurdistan Regional Government was founded. Talabani has pursued a negotiated settlement to the internecine problems plaguing the Kurdish movement, as well as the larger issue of Kurdish rights in the current regional context. He works closely with other Kurdish politicians as well as the rest of the Iraqi opposition factions. In close coordination with Masoud Barzani, Talabani and the Kurds played a key role as a partner of the US-led Coalition in the invasion of Iraq.[7] Talabani was a member of the Iraqi Governing Council that negotiated the Transitional Administrative Law (TAL), Iraq's interim constitution. The TAL governed all politics in Iraq and the process of writing and adopting the final constitution.


Talabani was elected President of Iraq on April 6, 2005 by the Iraqi National Assembly and sworn into office the following day. On April 22, 2006, Talabani began his second term as President of Iraq, becoming the first President elected under the country's new constitution. His office was part of the Presidency Council of Iraq. Nawshirwan Mustafa was Talabani's deputy until Mustafa resigned in 2006 and formed an opposition party called Gorran.

More here. He figures heavily in the Second Gulf War and its consequences.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-04-2017

[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Jouvet]French neuroscientist Marcel Jouvet[/url]

Michel Valentin Marcel Jouvet (16 November 1925 in Lons-le-Saunier, Jura, France – 3 October 2017) was Emeritus Professor of Experimental Medicine at the University of Lyon. He spent one year in the laboratory of the Horace Magoun in Long Beach, California in 1955. Since this date, he undertakes research of Experimental Neurophysiology in the Faculty of Medicine of Lyon and of Clinical Neurophysiology in the Neurological Hospital of Lyon.

Experimental Medicine Professor at the University of LYON 1, he was the Director of the Research Unit INSERM U 52 (Molecular Onirology) and of the Associated Unit UA 1195 of the CNRS (states of vigilance Neurobiology).
He described the electroencephalogram signs of cerebral death in 1959, and in 1961 categorized sleep into two different states: telencephalic (slow wave) sleep and rhombencephalic sleep (paradoxical sleep, known as REM sleep in English-language writings on the subject).

In The Paradox of Sleep (MIT Press, 1999) Jouvet proposed the speculative theory that the purpose of dreaming is a kind of iterative neurological programming that works to preserve an individual's psychological heredity, the basis of personality.

He was elected in 1977 to the French Academy of Sciences and has received the Intra-Sciences Prize in the United States in 1981 and the Prize of the Foundation for the Medical Research in 1983. In 1991 he was awarded the prestigious Prix mondial Cino Del Duca. His works, and those of his team, have brought about the discovery of paradoxical sleep and to its individualisation as the third state of functioning of the brain in 1959, to the discovery of its phylogenesis, of its ontogenesis and its main mechanisms.

Jouvet was the researcher who first developed the analeptic drug Modafinil.

In 1959 Michel Jouvet conducted several experiments on cats regarding muscle atonia (paralysis) during REM sleep. Jouvet demonstrated that the generation of REM sleep depends on an intact pontine tegmentum and that REM atonia is due to an inhibition of motor centres in the medulla oblongata. Cats with lesions around the locus coeruleus have less restricted muscle movement during REM sleep, and show a variety of complex behaviours including motor patterns suggesting that they are dreaming of attack, defense and exploration.

(Cat behavior and physiology are both highly predictable and highly applicable to humans).


RE: Obituaries - Eric the Green - 10-05-2017

(10-03-2017, 02:45 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: On the other side, classical musicians (except for French horn players -- it's a beautiful instrument but brutal on lungs) can live very long lives. It may be hard to believe, but Itzhak Perlman, who must have had as punishing a schedule as any rock star at one time, seems very healthy -- at 72. And he had polio.

Classical conductors are famous for long lives. Sure, there are accidents (Guido Cantelli, air crash; Istvan Kertesz, drowning) .. but even Bernstein lived into his seventies despite being gay and a smoker. Neville Marriner recently died at age 93. Toscanini died just short of age 90.

Fritz Reiner, Colin Davis, Georg Solti, Claudio Abbado, Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Charles Mackerras, Thomas Beecham, Bruno Walter, Karl Boehm, and Herbert von Karajan reached their eighties. Bernard Haitink is 88, and Seijo Ozawa is in his 80s. Leopold Stokowski barely missed being a centenarian. Want to live a long life, and have the choice of any career? Be a symphony conductor. I am not saying that that is a choice for many people. Neither is being a rock star.  

Concert pianists, violinists, and cellists? We have plenty of examples of octogenarians and nonagenarians. Horowitz, Serkin, Rubinstein... that's pianists. Don't forget harpsichordists, among which I can count Wanda Landowska, Gustav Leonhart, and some Czech harpsichordist whose name you can easily recover.

Do classical musicians take better care of themselves? Maybe. Maybe being well rested before a concert is a necessity. Junk food may not be part of the tour (although most of these performers lived before junk food was common).

Excellent point. Maybe rock stars can learn a thing or two from those within the longer classical musical tradition. It is not a given that rock stars must take drugs, eat poorly, or not stop touring even when the pressure becomes too much.

Of course, comparing rock stars to conductors and performers may not be totally fair. Rock musicians are frequently the creators of music today (although the music is usually not as good, from a refined and educated point of view), whereas the most apt comparison might be to classical composers. Rock n roll and jazz artists apparently have a tradition of drugs and/or alcohol to release inhibitions and open themselves to inspiration as well as to relieve pressure.

In the old days classical composers tended to die young. And they are still the best composers in the tradition, although society was less healthy than today. One of the best composers of recent times, though, Alan Hovhannes, lived to be 89. Harold Shapero lived to be 93.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-05-2017

(10-05-2017, 11:18 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: Excellent point. Maybe rock stars can learn a thing or two from those within the longer classical musical tradition. It is not a given that rock stars must take drugs, eat poorly, or not stop touring even when the pressure becomes too much.

Of course, comparing rock stars to conductors and performers may not be totally fair. Rock musicians are frequently the creators of music today (although the music is usually not as good, from a refined and educated point of view), whereas the most apt comparison might be to classical composers. Rock n roll and jazz artists apparently have a tradition of drugs and/or alcohol to release inhibitions and open themselves to inspiration as well as to relieve pressure.

In the old days classical composers tended to die young. And they are still the best composers in the tradition, although society was less healthy than today. One of the best composers of recent times, though, Alan Hovhannes, lived to be 89. Harold Shapero lived to be 93.


 Does Igor Stravinsky count as 'recent'? He died when we were teenagers.

Conducting is a mildly-athletic activity which conductors don't usually give up (other musicians tend to go that way, as Perlman is doing).  Although vigorous physical exercise such as running is really good for extending a lifetime, and I might note that one of the best identities for living to an advanced age is "Old Order Amish" -- they have practically no white-collar or sedentary jobs, and men and women both do heavy work for a long time.

But yes, avoid drugs and cancerweed, drink in moderation if at all, don't sleep with everything that moves, keep physically active, get adequate rest, and avoid junk food. If I am to guess which rock star is to live to age 90 who is now about 70 -- try Mick Jagger. It also helps to be intelligent enough to find meaning in life even in tough times (ask me!), and some of those rockers really are brilliant people. And let us not forget how surprised we were to find not that Chick Berry died, but instead that he was 90. We have few early rockers yet in their 80's. I think that Paul McCartney will get there.

One can age oneself quickly with cocaine. Think of Whitney Houston. I can only imagine what her heart (the organ) was like -- probably nonagenarian for all practical purposes. But the old perils for composers were much the same as those for most people at the time -- largely infectious diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Handel, Haydn, Verdi, Sibelius, and Vaughan-Williams lived to ripe old ages.


RE: Obituaries - beechnut79 - 10-05-2017

(10-05-2017, 12:46 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(10-05-2017, 11:18 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: Excellent point. Maybe rock stars can learn a thing or two from those within the longer classical musical tradition. It is not a given that rock stars must take drugs, eat poorly, or not stop touring even when the pressure becomes too much.

Of course, comparing rock stars to conductors and performers may not be totally fair. Rock musicians are frequently the creators of music today (although the music is usually not as good, from a refined and educated point of view), whereas the most apt comparison might be to classical composers. Rock n roll and jazz artists apparently have a tradition of drugs and/or alcohol to release inhibitions and open themselves to inspiration as well as to relieve pressure.

In the old days classical composers tended to die young. And they are still the best composers in the tradition, although society was less healthy than today. One of the best composers of recent times, though, Alan Hovhannes, lived to be 89. Harold Shapero lived to be 93.


 Does Igor Stravinsky count as 'recent'? He died when we were teenagers.

Conducting is a mildly-athletic activity which conductors don't usually give up (other musicians tend to go that way, as Perlman is doing).  Although vigorous physical exercise such as running is really good for extending a lifetime, and I might note that one of the best identities for living to an advanced age is "Old Order Amish" -- they have practically no white-collar or sedentary jobs, and men and women both do heavy work for a long time.

But yes, avoid drugs and cancerweed, drink in moderation if at all, don't sleep with everything that moves, keep physically active,  get adequate rest, and avoid junk food. If I am to guess which rock star is to live to age 90 who is now about 70 -- try Mick Jagger. It also helps to be intelligent enough to find meaning in life even in tough times (ask me!), and some of those rockers really are brilliant people.  And let us not forget how surprised we were to find not that Chick Berry died, but instead that he was 90. We have few early rockers yet in their 80's. I think that Paul McCartney will get there.

One can age oneself quickly with cocaine. Think of Whitney Houston. I can only imagine what her heart (the organ) was like -- probably nonagenarian for all practical purposes.  But the old perils for composers were much the same as those for most people at the time -- largely infectious diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Handel, Haydn, Verdi, Sibelius, and Vaughan-Williams lived to ripe old ages.

Of course there are notable exceptions in the rock field. Chuck Berry lived to 90. Kristofferson has now passed 80 and Dylan is well into his 70s. Are they the exceptions to the rule; probably not. He wasn't really a rocker, but Pete Seeger lived to 94.


RE: Obituaries - gabrielle - 10-06-2017

(10-05-2017, 02:03 PM)beechnut79 Wrote:
(10-05-2017, 12:46 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(10-05-2017, 11:18 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: Excellent point. Maybe rock stars can learn a thing or two from those within the longer classical musical tradition. It is not a given that rock stars must take drugs, eat poorly, or not stop touring even when the pressure becomes too much.

Of course, comparing rock stars to conductors and performers may not be totally fair. Rock musicians are frequently the creators of music today (although the music is usually not as good, from a refined and educated point of view), whereas the most apt comparison might be to classical composers. Rock n roll and jazz artists apparently have a tradition of drugs and/or alcohol to release inhibitions and open themselves to inspiration as well as to relieve pressure.

In the old days classical composers tended to die young. And they are still the best composers in the tradition, although society was less healthy than today. One of the best composers of recent times, though, Alan Hovhannes, lived to be 89. Harold Shapero lived to be 93.


 Does Igor Stravinsky count as 'recent'? He died when we were teenagers.

Conducting is a mildly-athletic activity which conductors don't usually give up (other musicians tend to go that way, as Perlman is doing).  Although vigorous physical exercise such as running is really good for extending a lifetime, and I might note that one of the best identities for living to an advanced age is "Old Order Amish" -- they have practically no white-collar or sedentary jobs, and men and women both do heavy work for a long time.

But yes, avoid drugs and cancerweed, drink in moderation if at all, don't sleep with everything that moves, keep physically active,  get adequate rest, and avoid junk food. If I am to guess which rock star is to live to age 90 who is now about 70 -- try Mick Jagger. It also helps to be intelligent enough to find meaning in life even in tough times (ask me!), and some of those rockers really are brilliant people.  And let us not forget how surprised we were to find not that Chick Berry died, but instead that he was 90. We have few early rockers yet in their 80's. I think that Paul McCartney will get there.

One can age oneself quickly with cocaine. Think of Whitney Houston. I can only imagine what her heart (the organ) was like -- probably nonagenarian for all practical purposes.  But the old perils for composers were much the same as those for most people at the time -- largely infectious diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Handel, Haydn, Verdi, Sibelius, and Vaughan-Williams lived to ripe old ages.

Of course there are notable exceptions in the rock field. Chuck Berry lived to 90. Kristofferson has now passed 80 and Dylan is well into his 70s. Are they the exceptions to the rule; probably not. He wasn't really a rocker, but Pete Seeger lived to 94.

Keith Richards is 73.  Jerry Lee Lewis is 82.  Little Richard is 84.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-09-2017

Yelberton Abraham Tittle Jr.

(almost always known by his initials)

Y. A. Tittle, (October 24, 1926 – October 8, 2017) was a professional American football quarterback. He played in the National Football League (NFL) for the San Francisco 49ers, New York Giants, and Baltimore Colts, after spending two seasons with the Colts in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC).[b] Known for his competitiveness, leadership, and striking profile, Tittle was the centerpiece of several prolific offenses throughout his seventeen-year professional career from 1948 to 1964.

Tittle played college football for Louisiana State University, where he was a two-time All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) quarterback for the LSU Tigers football team. As a junior, he was named the most valuable player (MVP) of the infamous 1947 Cotton Bowl Classic—also known as the "Ice Bowl"—a scoreless tie between the Tigers and Arkansas Razorbacks in a snowstorm. After college, he was drafted in the 1947 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions, but he instead chose to play in the AAFC for the Colts.

With the Colts, Tittle was named the AAFC Rookie of the Year in 1948 after leading the team to the AAFC playoffs. After back-to-back one-win seasons, the Colts franchise folded, which allowed Tittle to be drafted in the 1951 NFL Draft by the 49ers. Through ten seasons in San Francisco, he was invited to four Pro Bowls, led the league in touchdown passes in 1955, and was named the NFL Player of the Year by the United Press in 1957. A groundbreaker, Tittle was part of the 49ers' famed "Million Dollar Backfield", was the first professional football player featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated, and is credited with coining "alley-oop" as a sports term.

Considered washed-up, the 34-year-old Tittle was traded to the Giants following the 1960 season. Over the next four seasons, he won multiple NFL MVP awards, twice set the league single-season record for touchdown passes, and led the Giants to three straight NFL championship games. Although he was never able to deliver a championship to the team, Tittle's time in New York is regarded among the glory years of the franchise.[3] In his final season, Tittle was photographed bloodied and kneeling down in the end zone after a tackle by a defender left him helmetless. The photograph is considered one of the most iconic images in North American sports history. He retired as the NFL's all-time leader in passing yards, passing touchdowns, attempts, completions, and games played. Tittle was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1971, and his jersey number 14 is retired by the Giants.


Tittle was the sixth overall selection of the 1948 NFL Draft, taken by the Detroit Lions.[16] However, Tittle instead began his professional career with the Baltimore Colts of the All-America Football Conference in 1948. That season, already being described as a "passing ace",[17] he was unanimously recognized as the AAFC Rookie of the Year by UPI after passing for 2,739 yards and leading the Colts to the brink of an Eastern Division championship.[8] After a 1–11 win–loss record in 1949, the Colts joined the National Football League in 1950. The team again posted a single win against eleven losses, and the franchise folded after the season due to financial difficulties.[18] Players on the roster at the time of the fold were eligible to be drafted in the next NFL draft.[19]

Tittle was then drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in the 1951 NFL Draft after the Colts folded. While many players at the time were unable to play immediately due to military duties, Tittle had received a class IV-F exemption due to physical ailments, so he was able to join the 49ers roster that season.[20] In 1951 and 1952, he shared time at quarterback with Frankie Albert. In 1953, his first full season as the 49ers' starter, he passed for 2,121 yards and twenty touchdowns and was invited to his first Pro Bowl.[21] San Francisco finished with a 9–3 regular season record, which was good enough for second in the Western Conference, and led the league in points scored.[22]
In 1954, the 49ers compiled their Million Dollar Backfield, which was composed of four future Hall of Famers: Tittle; fullbacks John Henry Johnson and Joe Perry; and halfback Hugh McElhenny.[23][24] "It made quarterbacking so easy because I just get in the huddle and call anything and you have three Hall of Fame running backs ready to carry the ball," Tittle reminisced in 2006.[23] The team had aspirations for a championship run, but injuries, including McElhenny's separated shoulder in the sixth game of the season, ended those hopes and the 49ers finished third in the Western Division.[24][25] Tittle starred in his second straight Pro Bowl appearance as he threw two touchdown passes, including one to 49ers teammate Billy Wilson, who was named the game's MVP.[26]
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[Image: 150px-Tittle_1954_Sports_Illustrated_cover.jpg]

Tittle on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1954

Tittle became the first professional football player featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated when he appeared on its fifteenth issue dated November 22, 1954, donning his 49ers uniform and helmet featuring an acrylic face mask distinct to the time period.[24][27] The cover photo also shows a metal bracket on the side of Tittle's helmet which served to protect his face by preventing the helmet from caving in.[28] The 1954 cover was the first of four Sports Illustrated covers he graced during his career.[29]

Tittle led the NFL in touchdown passes for the first time in 1955, with 17, while also leading the league with 28 interceptions thrown.[4] When the 49ers hired Frankie Albert as head coach in 1956,[30] Tittle was pleased with the choice at first, figuring Albert would be a good mentor.[4] However, the team lost four of its first five games, and Albert replaced Tittle with rookie Earl Morrall. After a loss to the Los Angeles Rams brought San Francisco's record to 1–6, Tittle regained the starting role and the team finished undefeated with one tie through the season's final five games.[4][31]

In 1957, Tittle and receiver R. C. Owens devised a pass play in which Tittle tossed the ball high into the air and the 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) Owens leapt to retrieve it, typically resulting in a long gain or a touchdown. Tittle dubbed the play the "alley-oop"—the first usage of the term in sports[32]—and it was highly successful when utilized.[33] The 49ers finished the regular season with an 8–4 record and hosted the Detroit Lions in the Western Conference playoff. Against the Lions Tittle passed for 248 yards and tossed three touchdown passes—one each to Owens, McElhenny, and Wilson—but Detroit overcame a twenty-point third quarter deficit to win 31–27.[34] For the season, Tittle had a league-leading 63.1 completion percentage, threw for 2,157 yards and thirteen touchdowns, and rushed for six more scores. He was deemed "pro player of the year" by a United Press poll of members of the National Football Writers Association.[35][36] Additionally, he was named to his first All-Pro team and invited to his third Pro Bowl.[37][38]

After a poor 1958 preseason by Tittle, Albert started John Brodie at quarterback for the 1958 season, a decision that proved unpopular with the fan base.[4] Tittle came in to relieve Brodie in a week six game against the Lions, with ten minutes left in the game and the 49ers down 21–17. His appearance "drew a roar of approval from the crowd of 59,213," after which he drove the team downfield and threw a 32-yard touchdown pass to McElhenny for the winning score.[39] A right knee ligament injury against the Colts in week nine ended Tittle's season, and San Francisco finished with a 7–5 record, followed by Albert's resignation as coach.[4] Tittle and Brodie continued to share time at quarterback over the next two seasons.[4] In his fourth and final Pro Bowl game with the 49ers in 1959, Tittle completed 13 of 17 passes for 178 yards and a touchdown.[40]

Under new head coach Red Hickey in 1960, the 49ers adopted the shotgun formation.[41] The first implementation of the shotgun was in week nine against the Colts, with Brodie at quarterback while Tittle nursed a groin injury. The 49ers scored a season-high thirty points, and with Brodie in the shotgun won three of their last four games to salvage a winning season at 7–5.[4] Though conflicted, Tittle decided to get into shape and prepare for the next season. He stated in his 2009 autobiography that at times he thought, "The hell with it. Quit this damned game. You have been at it too long anyway." But then another voice within him would say, "Come back for another year and show them you're still a good QB. Don't let them shotgun you out of football!"[4] However, after the first preseason game of 1961, Hickey informed Tittle he had been traded to the New York Giants.[4]

In mid-August 1961, the 49ers traded the 34-year-old Tittle to the New York Giants for second-year guard Lou Cordileone.[42] Cordileone, the 12th overall pick in the 1960 NFL Draft, was quoted as reacting "Me, even up for Y. A. Tittle? You're kidding,"[24] and later remarked that the Giants traded him for "a 42-year-old quarterback."[43] Tittle's view of Cordileone was much the same, stating his dismay that the 49ers did not get a "name ballplayer" in return.[4][43] He was also displeased with being traded to the East Coast, and said he would rather have been traded to the Los Angeles Rams.[43]

Already considered washed up,[44] the Giants intended to have Tittle share quarterback duties with 40-year-old Charlie Conerly, who had been with the team since 1948.[45] The players at first remained loyal to Conerly, and treated Tittle with the cold shoulder.[46][47] Tittle missed the season opener due to a back injury sustained before the season.[48] His first game with New York came in week two, against the Steelers, in which he and Conerly each threw a touchdown pass in the Giants' 17–14 win.[49] He became the team's primary starter for the remainder of the season and led the revitalized Giants to first place in the Eastern Conference.[50] The Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) awarded Tittle its Jim Thorpe Trophy as the NFL's players' choice of MVP.[51][52] In the 1961 NFL Championship Game, the Giants were soundly defeated by Vince Lombardi's Green Bay Packers, as they were shut-out 0–37.[53] Tittle completed six of twenty passes in the game and threw four interceptions.[54]

In January 1962, Tittle stated his intention to retire following the 1962 season.[55] After an off-season quarterback competition with Ralph Guglielmi,[45] Tittle played and started in a career-high 14 games. He tied an NFL record by throwing seven touchdown passes in a game on October 28, 1962, in a 49–34 win over the Washington Redskins.[56][57] Against the Dallas Cowboys in the regular season finale, Tittle threw six touchdown passes to set the single-season record with 33, which had been set the previous year by Sonny Jurgensen's 32.[58] He earned player of the year honors from the Washington D.C. Touchdown Club,[59] UPI,[36] and The Sporting News,[60] and finished just behind Green Bay's Jim Taylor in voting for the AP NFL Most Valuable Player Award.[61] The Giants again finished first in the Eastern Conference and faced the Packers in the 1962 NFL Championship Game. In frigid, windy conditions at Yankee Stadium and facing a constant pass rush from the Packers' front seven, Tittle completed only 18 of his 41 attempts in the game. The Packers won, 16–7, with New York's lone score coming on a blocked punt recovered in the end zone by Jim Collier.[62]

Tittle returned to the Giants in 1963 and, at age 37, supplanted his single-season passing touchdowns record by throwing 36.[4][63] He broke the record in the final game with three touchdowns against the Steelers, three days after being named NFL MVP by the AP.[64] The Giants led the league in scoring by a wide margin, and for the third time in as many years clinched the Eastern Conference title.[63] The Western champions were George Halas' Chicago Bears. The teams met in the 1963 NFL Championship Game at Wrigley Field. In the second quarter, Tittle injured his knee on a tackle by Larry Morris, and required a novocaine shot at halftime to continue playing. After holding a 10–7 halftime lead, The Giants were shutout in the second half, during which Tittle threw four interceptions. Playing through the knee injury, he completed 11 of 29 passes in the game for 147 yards, a touchdown, and five interceptions as the Bears won 14–10.[65][66]

The following year in 1964, Tittle's final season, the Giants went 2–10–2 (.214), the worst record in the 14-team league.[67] In the second game of the year, against Pittsburgh, he was blindsided by defensive end John Baker.[68] The tackle left Tittle with crushed cartilage in his ribs, a cracked sternum, and a concussion.[4] However, he played in every game the rest of the season, but was relegated to a backup role later in the year.[44] After throwing only ten touchdowns with 22 interceptions, he retired after the season at age 39, saying rookie quarterback Gary Wood not only "took my job away, but started to ask permission to date my daughter."[44][69] Over seventeen seasons as a professional, Tittle completed 2,427 out of 4,395 passes for 33,070 yards and 242 touchdowns, with 248 interceptions. He also scrambled for 39 touchdowns.[70]

(More at the title link).






[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y._A._Tittle]


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-13-2017

Scriptwriter Bob Schiller


Robert Schiller (November 8, 1918 – October 10, 2017) was an American screenwriter. He worked extensively with fellow producer/screenwriter Bob Weiskopf on numerous television shows in the United States, including I Love Lucy (1955–1957) and All in the Family (1977–1979) on the CBS network. For the latter series, he received an Emmy Award in 1978 as one of the writers of the episode "Cousin Liz."


[/url]
Schiller began writing for television in 1950. His credits include the 1955 CBS [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sitcom]sitcom
Professional Father, starring Stephen Dunne as a child psychologist and Barbara Billingsley as his wife. That same year, he wrote for two competing series, NBC's The Jimmy Durante Show and CBS's It's Always Jan, starring Janis Paige as a widowed single mother in New York City.[2] During 1954–1955, Schiller was one of the writers for That's My Boy, starring Eddie Mayehoff and Gil Stratton. Schiller's producing credits include The Good Guys and All's Fair.

Schiller also penned radio scripts for such classic shows as Duffy's Tavern, Abbott and Costello, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, The Mel Blanc Show, Sweeney and March, The Jimmy Durante Show, and December Bride, and then for TV stars such as Danny Thomas, Ed Wynn, Garry Moore, and Red Buttons.

The creative partnership and friendship with Bob Weiskopf began in 1953. Weiskopf, also a comedy writer, had just relocated to Los Angeles from New York City. Schiller's first wife recommended a school to Weiskopf's wife, and also mentioned that Schiller was looking for a partner. The two writers first collaborated on a radio script for the Our Miss Brooks show before delving into the new medium of network television. They wrote for popular 1950s shows such as Make Room for Daddy, The Bob Cummings Show, I Love Lucy, the television adaptation of the popular radio series My Favorite Husband, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Ann Sothern Show (which they co-created), and Pete and Gladys.

Further success would continue into the 1960s and 1970s with such series as The Lucy Show, The Red Skelton Show, The Good Guys (where they were also co-producers), The Phyllis Diller Show, The Carol Burnett Show, The Flip Wilson Show, Maude (which they also co-produced), All in the Family and its spinoff series, Archie Bunker's Place. Schiller and Weiskopf were honored with two Emmy Awards, a pair of Peabody Awards, a Golden Globe, and the Writers’ Guild of America's Paddy Chayefsky Laurel Award for Television Achievement.[3]


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-14-2017

Inventor of call waiting


The article is in Portuguese, so this is a very rough translation of a part of it.

Brazilian electrical engineer Nélio José Nicolai, inventer of Call Waiting, died at age 77 on October 11 of a cerebro-vascular accident. In recovery for two months, he died of pulmonary complications in Lago Norte, Brazil. 

His daughter, the entrepreneur Michelle Nicolai, says that he was the most wonderful father in the world, never missing an opportunity to do good for people. Her father struggled greatly not only to invent  things, but also serve his country. He dreamed to establish a technological school in which people could develop  their creativity to the fullest. He had plenty of opportunities to leave Brazil for greater opportunities abroad, yet he remained in Brazil to make them beneficial to Brazil.

(I would not be surprised to see a longer article in the English-language Wikipedia soon).

[url=https://g1.globo.com/distrito-federal/noticia/inventor-do-bina-nelio-nicolai-morre-em-brasilia-aos-77-anos.ghtml][/url]


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-17-2017

Maltese investigative journalist -- homicide under investigation:

Daphne Anne Caruana Galizia (née Vella; 26 August 1964 – 16 October 2017) was a Maltese journalist and blogger. She was known for her work as an investigative journalist and revealing controversial sensitive information, including reports and allegations related to the Panama Papers. She died in a car bomb attack in October 2017.[1]



Caruana Galizia began to work as a journalist in 1987. In the early 1990s, she was a regular columnist with The Sunday Times of Malta and an associate editor of The Malta Independent. She remained a columnist with The Malta Independent and The Malta Independent on Sunday, and was the editor of the Taste & Flair magazine.[3] She maintained a blog entitled Running Commentary, which included investigative reporting and commentary on a number of people, some of which would be labelled as personal attacks. The blog was one of the most popular websites in Malta.[4]

Caruana Galizia's controversial blog resulted in several legal battles. In 2010, she criticized Magistrate Consuelo Scerri Herrera in her blog, who then opened a libel and defamation case against her.[5] The case was withdrawn in November 2011.[6]
She was arrested on 8 March 2013 for breaking the political silence on the day before the 2013 general election, after she posted videos mocking then-Leader of the Opposition Joseph Muscat. She was questioned by police before being released after a few hours.[7][2]

Caruana Galizia was aware of Minister Konrad Mizzi and Chief of Staff Keith Schembri's involvement with companies in Panama before the Panama Papers leak of April 2016.[8] On 22 February, she hinted on Running Commentary that Mizzi had connections with Panama and New Zealand. This compelled the minister to reveal the existence of Rotorua Trust, a New Zealand-registered family trust, two days later. On 25 February, Caruana Galizia revealed that Schembri also owned a trust in New Zealand which in turn held a Panama company.[9]
The April 2016 leak confirmed that Mizzi owned the Panama company Hearnville Inc, and that Mizzi and Schembri had also opened another company Tillgate Inc. The companies were also owned by the Orion Trust New Zealand Limited, which are the same trustees of Mizzi and Schembri's New Zealand trusts, Rotorua and Haast respectively.[8]
[/url]
As the first person to break news of Mizzi's and Schembri's involvement in Panama,
[4] she was subsequently named by Politico as one of "28 people who are shaping, shaking and stirring Europe."[10] Politico described her as a "one-woman WikiLeaks, crusading against untransparency and corruption in Malta."[11]

In 2017, she alleged that Egrant, another Panama company, was owned by Michelle Muscat, the wife of Prime Minister Joseph Muscat. These allegations resulted in Muscat calling the June 2017 general elections, which saw Muscat's Labour Party remaining in government. After the elections, Caruana Galizia was also a harsh critic of the new Nationalist opposition leader Adrian Delia.[4]

Caruana Galizia was assassinated using a car bomb in her rented Peugeot 108 close to her home in Bidnija on 16 October 2017. The large explosion left the vehicle scattered in several pieces across nearby fields. She was found by her son Matthew, after he heard a blast from their home.[12] Caruana Galizia had reportedly filed a police report saying that she was being threatened about two weeks before her death.[13] The perpetrator is currently unknown.[14]

The murder was condemned by Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, who stated that he "will not rest before justice is done" despite her criticism of him. President Marie Louise Coleiro Preca, Archbishop Charles Scicluna and a number of politicians also expressed their condolences or condemned the murder.[13] Opposition leader Adrian Delia called the murder "the collapse of democracy and freedom of expression"[15] and stated that "[the country's] institutions have let us down".[16] President of the European Parliament Antonio Tajani called the killing a "tragic example of a journalist who sacrificed her life to seek out the truth."[15] Gerard Ryle, director of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, stated that the organization is "shocked" by Caruana Galizia's murder and "is deeply concerned about freedom of the press in Malta."[17]

The murder was reported in both local and international media. Caruana Galizia's name began trending worldwide on Twitter,[15] and a number of Maltese expressed their mourning by blacking out their Facebook profile pictures. The hashtag #JeSuisDaphne, echoing the term Je suis Charlie, also appeared.[18]

Thousands of people attended a vigil in Caruana Galizia's hometown [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sliema]Sliema on the night of 16 October.[18] Another vigil was held at the Malta High Commission in London.[19]

Forensic teams and police investigators arrived at the crime scene soon after the murder. The head of the magisterial inquiry is to be Magistrate Consuelo Scerri Herrera, who had fought a legal battle with Caruana Galizia in 2010–11. Caruana Galizia's family are challenging her role in the investigation.[4]

Muscat stated that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been asked to help the police in investigating the murder.[16] A police forensic investigation team from the Netherlands will also assist.[20]

(Panama Papers -- a disclosure of tax cheating and money laundering by economic elites worldwide)


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-25-2017

Robert Guillaume (born Robert Peter Williams; November 30, 1927 – October 24, 2017) was an American actor, known for his role as Isaac Jaffe on Sports Night and as Benson on the TV series Soap and the spin-off Benson,[1] as well as for voicing the mandrill Rafiki in The Lion King.[2] In a career that spanned more than 50 years he worked extensively on stage (including a Tony Award nomination), television (including winning two Emmy Awards), and film.

[Image: 150px-Robert_Mandan_Robert_Guillaume_SOAP_1977.JPG]

As Benson in Soap, 1977.

Guillaume made several guest appearances on sitcoms, including Good Times, The Jeffersons, Sanford and Son, Saved By The Bell: The College Years and in the 1990s sitcoms The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and A Different World.[8] His series-regular debut was on the ABC series Soap, playing Benson, a butler, from 1977 to 1979.[11] Guillaume continued the role in a spin-off series, Benson, from 1979 until 1986.[3] Guillaume also played Dr. Franklin in season 6, episode 8 ("Chain Letter") of the series All in the Family, which he coyly referenced Marcus Welby, M.D., a TV series in which he had guest-starred on in 1970.[12]

In 1985, Guillaume appeared in the television mini-series North and South as abolitionist leader Fredrick Douglass, who escaped from slavery and became a leader of the anti-slavery movement prior to the American Civil War.[10]
He also appeared as marriage counselor Edward Sawyer on The Robert Guillaume Show (1989), Detective Bob Ballard on Pacific Station (1991–1992), and television executive Isaac Jaffe on Aaron Sorkin's short-lived but critically acclaimed Sports Night (1998–2000).[3] Guillaume suffered a mild stroke on January 14, 1999, while filming an episode of the latter series.[1] He recovered and his character was later also depicted as having had a stroke. He also made a guest appearance on 8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter.[11]

His voice was employed for characters in television series Captain Planet and the Planeteers, Fish Police, and Happily Ever After: Fairy Tales for Every Child.[5] He was known for the voice of Rafiki in the movie The Lion King and its sequels and spin-offs.[13] He voiced Mr. Thicknose in The Land Before Time VIII: The Big Freeze.[14] He also supplied the voice for Eli Vance in the 2004 video game Half-Life 2 and its subsequent sequels.[15]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Guillaume