Generational Theory Forum: The Fourth Turning Forum: A message board discussing generations and the Strauss Howe generational theory
Obituaries - Printable Version

+- Generational Theory Forum: The Fourth Turning Forum: A message board discussing generations and the Strauss Howe generational theory (http://generational-theory.com/forum)
+-- Forum: Fourth Turning Forums (http://generational-theory.com/forum/forum-1.html)
+--- Forum: Special Topics/G-T Lounge (http://generational-theory.com/forum/forum-4.html)
+--- Thread: Obituaries (/thread-59.html)

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43


RE: Obituaries - Marypoza - 10-03-2016

(09-25-2016, 10:29 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Quite possibly a legend in the making:

José Fernández

José D. Fernández (July 31, 1992 – September 25, 2016) was a Cuban American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Miami Marlins from 2013 through 2016.

Fernández was born in Santa Clara, Cuba. He made three unsuccessful attempts at defecting before he was successful in 2008. He enrolled at Braulio Alonso High School in Tampa, Florida, and was selected by the Marlins in the first round of the 2011 MLB draft. Fernández made his MLB debut with the Marlins on April 7, 2013. He was named to the 2013 MLB All-Star Game and won the National League (NL) Rookie of the Month Award in July and August. After the season, he won the NL Rookie of the Year Award and finished third in Cy Young Award balloting. He underwent Tommy John surgery during the 2014 season, and made the MLB All-Star Game again in 2016.

Fernández died in a boating accident in Miami Beach on September 25, 2016.

And a legend beyond any qualification:

Arnold Palmer

Arnold Daniel Palmer (September 10, 1929 – September 25, 2016) was an American professional golfer, who is generally regarded as one of the greatest players in professional golf history. He won numerous events on both the PGA Tour and Champions Tour, dating back to 1955. Nicknamed "The King", he was one of golf's most popular stars and its most important trailblazer, because he was the first superstar of the sport's television age, which began in the 1950s.

Palmer's social impact on behalf of golf was perhaps unrivaled among fellow professionals; his humble background and plain-spoken popularity helped change the perception of golf as an elite, upper-class pastime to a more democratic sport accessible to middle and working classes.[1] Palmer is part of "The Big Three" in golf during the 1960s, along with Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player, who are widely credited with popularizing and commercializing the sport around the world.

Palmer won the PGA Tour Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998, and in 1974 was one of the 13 original inductees into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

-- could it have been the Xaralto?

Seriously-- my cousin's mother-in-law passed bcuz of complications involving Xaralto & the family's involved in a class action suit


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-07-2016

Michal Kováč (5 August 1930 – 5 October 2016) was the first President of Slovakia, having served from 1993 through 1998.[1]

Kováč was born in the village of Ľubiša in then Czechoslovakia in 1930.[2] He graduated from the present-day University of Economics in Bratislava and was a bank employee of the Státní banka československá and of other banks. As such, he spent some years in London and in Cuba in the 1960s. During the Normalization he was subject to some persecution.




Kováč was elected president by the National Council of Slovakia in February 1993 (because he was a candidate of the biggest parliamentary party—the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia) and inaugurated on 2 March 1993. He soon became a strong opponent of Prime Minister Vladimír Mečiar and by giving a critical presidential address to parliament in March 1994, Kováč significantly contributed to the deposition of the then Mečiar government and the creation of the Moravčík government (which only lasted until the next parliamentary election in the autumn of 1994).

In 1995 the Mečiar-Kováč conflict intensified and the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia cancelled Kováč's (formal) membership in the party. In August 1995 Kováč's son, who had been accused of financial crimes by German authorities (the accusation was later canceled), was apparently kidnapped and taken to Austria. The president, opposition parties and Austrian court accused the Slovak intelligence service (SIS) and the government of having organized this kidnapping. The investigation of new secret intelligence service director Mitro and Slovak police after collapse of Meciar's regime in the end of 1999 confirmed the participation of SIS on this kidnap but the Slovak justice rejected the trial with its suspected actors because of amnesty (also called self-amnesty) issued by Vladimir Meciar on 3 March 1998.

Kováč's term ended on 2 March 1998. His candidature in the first direct Slovak presidential election, 1999 was unsuccessful. He has not been very visible in Slovak politics since this time and has appeared only at a few symbolic events.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michal_Kov%C3%A1%C4%8D


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-14-2016

Leo Leroy Beranek (September 15, 1914 – October 10, 2016) was an American acoustics expert, former MIT professor, and a founder and former president of Bolt, Beranek and Newman (now BBN Technologies). He authored Acoustics, considered a classic textbook in this field, and its updated and extended version published in 2012 under the title Acoustics: Sound Fields and Transducers. He is also an expert in the design and evaluation of concert halls and opera houses, and authored the classic textbook Music, Acoustics, and Architecture, revised and extended in 2004 under the title Concert Halls and Opera Houses: Music, Acoustics, and Architecture.

In 1924 Beranek's father brought home a battery-powered radio containing a single vacuum tube. His eldest son became fascinated with both the technology and the musical aspects of radio. In the harsh winter of January 1926, Beranek's mother died suddenly, leaving his father with huge debts and forcing his father to sell the farm within two months. In junior high school Beranek earned his first independent money by selling silk stockings and fabric. Beranek's father remarried and moved the family to the nearby town of Mount Vernon, Iowa, where he became co-owner of a hardware store. At his father's suggestion, Beranek learned radio repair via a correspondence course, and apprenticed to an older repairman. The younger Beranek quickly learned the trade, and was soon able to buy a Model T automobile. He also earned some spare cash by playing trap drums in a 6-person dance band. He continued to excel in his studies, including a typing class (rarely studied by boys) where he was the top performer.[1]:11

Beranek applied for and was accepted at nearby Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa. In the aftermath of the Wall Street Crash of 1929, money was tight, but he had managed to save $500. Worried about the shaky financial situation, he went to his bank and managed to withdraw $400 to pay his college tuition in advance. The bank failed the next day, and Beranek lost the remaining $100.[1]:12 During freshman year at college, Beranek was told by his father that he could not expect any family money and that he was on his own. In the summers of 1932 and 1933 Beranek worked as a field hand on local farms, to earn tuition money and to improve his physical condition. Beranek moved into two rooms above a bakery, shared with three other students to save money. He also continued to repair radios and played in a dance band, but falling income forced him to consider dropping down to a single class (in mathematics) during the next academic year.

In August 1933 Beranek was invited to accompany the family of a local dentist to the Century of Progress World's Fair in Chicago. This was his first trip to a big city and it was a revelation. He attended concert performances by the Chicago Symphony and Detroit Symphony daily, was dazzled by the displays of industrial products and technology, and fascinated by the international pavilions. He lived on a shoestring, spending a total of $12 for four days, and felt compelled to make a return trip the following summer.[1]:14–15
In college Beranek became friends with a fellow student who had an amateur radio setup, inspiring him to study Morse Code and to earn his own amateur radio license. In fall of 1933, he bought an early disc sound recorder to earn a modest fee by recording students before and after taking a speech training class. This was his first hands-on experience with the developing science of acoustics. By early 1934 he was forced to stop out from college and work full-time to earn more tuition money. He found a position at the fledgling Collins Radio Company of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he studied German in his spare time. While there, he also met and dated Florence "Floss" Martin, a business school student. He was able to save enough money to attend the Spring 1935 semester at Cornell College, then returned to Collins Radio for the summer.

In August 1935 Beranek had a chance encounter with a stranger whose car had developed a flat tire while passing through Mount Vernon. While helping the stranger (who turned out to be Glenn Browning), he learned that the passing motorist had written a technical paper on radio technology. When Beranek mentioned plans for graduate school, Browning encouraged him to apply to Harvard University, a possibility he had regarded as financially out of reach.[1]:20

Beranek was very busy in his final year at Cornell, running a radio repair and sales business and then transitioning to house wiring for electricity, while carrying a full course load. He managed three major wiring jobs for Cornell, including designing and installing a master antenna system in a new men's dormitory then under construction.[1]:23 He also continued to date his girlfriend Floss. Beranek graduated from Cornell College in summer 1936 with a Bachelor of Arts. He continued studies at Harvard University, where he received a doctorate in 1940.

During World War II Beranek managed Harvard's electro-acoustics laboratory, which designed communications and noise reduction systems for World War II aircraft, while at the same time developing other military technologies. During this time he built the first anechoic chamber, an extremely quiet room for studying noise effects which later would inspire John Cage's philosophy of silence.
In 1945 Beranek became involved with a small company called Hush-A-Phone, which marketed a cup that fit over the mouthpiece of a telephone receiver in order to prevent the person speaking from being overheard. Although Hush-A-Phone had been around since the 1920s, Beranek used his acoustical expertise to develop an improved version of the device. AT&T threatened Hush-A-Phone users with termination of their telephone service. At the time, AT&T maintained a monopoly on American telephone service and telephones were leased from AT&T, rather than owned by customers. The resulting legal case, Hush-A-Phone v. United States, resulted in a victory for Hush-A-Phone. In finding that AT&T did not have the right to restrict use of the Hush-A-Phone, the courts established a precedent that would eventually lead to the breakup of AT&T's monopoly.[2]

Beranek joined the staff at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as professor of communications engineering from 1947 to 1958. In 1948, he helped found Bolt, Beranek and Newman (BBN), serving as the company's president from 1952 to 1969. He continued to serve as chief scientist of BBN through 1971, as he led Boston Broadcasters, Inc. which (after a court battle) took control of television station WCVB-TV.[3]

Beranek's 1954 book, Acoustics, is considered the classic textbook in this field; it was revised in 1986. In 2012, at the age of 98, he collaborated with Tim Mellow to produce an updated and extended revision, published under the new title Acoustics: Sound Fields and Transducers.[4]

Beranek's 1962 book, Music, Acoustics, and Architecture, developed from his analysis of 55 concert halls throughout the world, also became a classic; the 2004 edition of the text expanded the study to 100 halls. Beranek has participated in the design of numerous concert halls and opera houses, and has traveled worldwide to conduct his research and to enjoy musical performances.
From 1983 to 1986, Beranek was chairman of the board of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, where he remained a Life Trustee. He also served on the MIT Council for the Arts, "an international volunteer group of alumni and friends established to support the arts at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology".[5] In 2008 he published Riding the Waves : A Life in Sound, Science, and Industry, an autobiography about his lengthy career and research in sound and music. He turned 100 in September 2014, an occasion marked by a special celebration at Boston Symphony Hall.[6] Beranek died on October 10, 2016 at the age of 102.[3][7] His last paper, "Concert hall acoustics: Recent findings", had been published earlier that year.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Beranek


RE: Obituaries - beechnut79 - 10-15-2016

I would like to mention the recent passing of three legends of the music world.

John D. Loudermilk, 82, passed on Sept. 21. Composer of many pop and country hits including "Tobacco Road", "Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye", "Sad Movies", "Break My Mind", "Abilene" and "It's My Time". Although his biggest success was as a writer of songs that were hits for other artists, he did do some recording himself. In early 1967 he had a minor hit with his own version of "It's My Time", which also was recorded by Dolly Parton, George Hamilton IV and Jody Miller.

Stanley Dural Jr., better known as Buckwheat Zydeco, passed on Sept. 24. He almost singlehandedly was responsible for taking this accordion based music out of the Louisiana Bayou and around the world. A goodwill ambassador for this brand of music.

Jean Shepherd, one of the original honky-tonk queens and one of the first female members of the Grand Ole Opry, passed Sept. 25 at age 82. She was the wife of Hawkashaw Hawkins, who was killed in the 1963 plane crash which also claimed the now legendary Patsy Cline, who was one of the first country stars to cross over into pop. Ms. Shepherd resisted the pressure to do the same and chose instead to stick to her pure country roots, paving the was for later female honky-tonkers such as Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette.


RE: Obituaries - Dan '82 - 10-15-2016

Quote:http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2016/10/15/inspirational-ex-jet-dennis-byrd-killed-in-car-crash/


Inspirational ex-Jet Dennis Byrd killed in car crash
Posted by Michael David Smith on October 15, 2016, 9:09 PM EDT
[Image: 355067-e1476580130180.jpg?w=206] 


Dennis Byrd, a former Jets defensive lineman best known for battling back from a serious spinal injury and recovering to walk again, has died at the age of 51.
Byrd was killed in a car crash in Claremore, Oklahoma, today. According to Fox 23, Byrd was driving down the highway when his vehicle was struck head on by another vehicle, which had crossed the center line. A 12-year-old passenger in Byrd’s vehicle was hospitalized, as was the 17-year-old boy driving the vehicle that hit Byrd’s vehicle. Byrd was pronounced dead at the scene.
A second-round draft pick of the Jets in 1989, Byrd played four NFL seasons before suffering a serious neck injury in a collision with a teammate. Byrd was paralyzed and his career was over, but after lengthy physical therapy he was able to walk again. At the Jets’ home opener in 1993, Byrd walked to the middle of the field to represent his team in the pregame coin toss, and there he was given the team’s Most Inspirational Player Award, which is now known as the Dennis Byrd Award.
In 2012, when the Jets retired Byrd’s No. 90 jersey, he said that in his retirement from football he had found joy in coaching youth sports and speaking on behalf of people with disabilities.
“I really have loved coaching football and working with kids, talking about the lessons I’ve learned as an athlete and the journey as someone with a disability,” Byrd said then. “Football has always been, for me, a cornerpost of strength and a way to accomplish things in life, whether it’s on the field or just in maintaining a quality of life. All those lessons — dedication, perseverance, teamwork — they all dovetail nicely into living a blessed life.”



RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-16-2016

My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

But today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.


RE: Obituaries - Bad Dog - 10-16-2016

(10-16-2016, 10:03 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

Nut today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.

I'm sorry, PRB.

It has been six years since my mother died, and I still pick up the phone to call her.

Wally.


RE: Obituaries - Odin - 10-17-2016

(10-16-2016, 10:03 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

But today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.

I'm so sorry! Sad


RE: Obituaries - Marypoza - 10-20-2016

(10-16-2016, 10:03 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

But today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.

---- I am so sorry for your loss


RE: Obituaries - gabrielle - 10-20-2016

(10-16-2016, 10:03 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

But today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.

Sorry for your loss.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-20-2016

Ken Saru-Wiwa, Jr.

Wiwa was born in Lagos, the eldest son of Nigerian human rights activist and author Ken Saro-Wiwa.[2] He was educated in Nigeria and at Stancliffe Hall School and Tonbridge School in England, and then at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of University College, London. He was editor of the United Kingdom's Guardian′s periodical New Media Lab, where he developed content for the paper's online edition.


Wiwa relocated to Canada in 1999, where he was a writer-in-residence at Massey College in the University of Toronto, Saul Rae Fellow at the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto,[2] a mentor at the Trudeau Foundation[2] in Canada and a columnist for The Globe and Mail,[2] where he was twice nominated for National Newspaper Awards for feature writing.[3]

Wiwa addressed the European Union, Oxford Union and spoken at a number of colleges and universities, including Harvard University, McGill University and the University of Cambridge. He served as a conference rapporteur at a UN meeting on cultural diversity. A regular commentator on major news channels including CNN, BBC, Al-Jazeera, he appeared as a guest on Hard Talk and Newsnight.

In 2005 he was selected by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Leader.[2] He was the founding curator of the Abuja Hub for the Globalshapers Programme of the World Economic Forum and has also served on the Africa Advisory Council of the Prince of Wales Rainforest Project.[4] He has wrote for The Guardian in the UK,[2][4] and the Washington Post, The New York Times and National Geographic, in the United States'. He served as an editor-at-large for Arise Magazine and contributed occasional columns for magazines, newspapers and blogs.

Wiwa produced and narrated television and radio documentaries for the BBC and CBC,[2][4] and wrote commentaries for National Public Radio. His memoir of his father, In the Shadow of a Saint, won the 2002 Hurston-Wright Nonfiction Award.[4]
Special Assistant

In 2005 he returned to Nigeria, and the following year former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo appointed Wiwa as his special assistant on peace, conflict resolution and reconciliation. He served President Umaru Yar'Adua as special assistant on international affairs.


Wiwa died in London on 18 October 2016,[5] aged 47, after suffering a stroke.[6]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Wiwa


RE: Obituaries - The Wonkette - 10-21-2016

(10-16-2016, 10:03 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: My father died this morning.

He had not been himself for half a year. He unwittingly messed up my life badly in most of that time. I made a point to see him last night, and I saw a look of terror that I had seen only on my mother as she approached death.

I took the dog (who had a right to know) along. Supposedly he could hear, and about the only thing I could think of was to read the Bible. If he could still hear, then that could offer more assurance than anything else. It's not that I am a religious man; I am not. I had asked the nursing home staff to try to bring over a clergyman to give him some assurances.

Psalm 23, of course, and Psalm 33... the latter a psalm that Johann Sebastian Bach set as a delightful motet (but in German and not in English as in the King James Version).

But today I can almost cite Schopenhauer on how I feel: Obit anus, obit onus.  It has been that hard.

Like the other posters here, I am so sorry. May you find healing in this difficult time.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-24-2016

Tom Hayden, 2T radical

(Reuters) - Veteran social activist and politician Tom Hayden, a stalwart of America’s New Left who served 18 years in California’s state legislature and gained a dash of Hollywood glamour by marrying actress Jane Fonda, has died aged 76, according to media reports.
Hayden died in Santa Monica, California, after a lengthy illness, The Los Angeles Times reported on its web site.
“A political giant and dear friend has passed,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti wrote on Twitter, adding “Tom Hayden fought harder for what he believed than just about anyone I have known.”


Hayden, who forged his political activism as a founding member of Students for a Democratic Society, which stood at the core of the 1960s anti-war and civil rights movements, was principal author of the group’s revolutionary manifesto, the Port Huron Statement.
The University of Michigan student ventured into the Deep South, where he joined voter registration campaigns and was arrested and beaten while taking part in the “freedom rider” protests against racial segregation.

Hayden, however, became perhaps best known as one of the “Chicago Eight” activists tried on conspiracy and incitement charges following protests at the turbulent 1968 Democratic National Convention. He was ultimately acquitted of all charges.
A New York Times book review of his 1988 memoir, “Reunion,” one of more than 20 books published under his name, called Hayden “the single greatest figure of the 1960s student movement.”

Outliving contemporaries Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Eldridge Cleaver and Huey Newton, Hayden remained active in left-wing politics well into the 21st century, posting on Twitter just a week ago. Winning election himself to the California state Assembly in 1982, and then the state Senate a decade later, Hayden went on to serve a total of 18 years.

Later he became director of the Peace and Justice Resource Center, a nonprofit left-wing think tank devoted mainly to analysis of continued U.S. military involvement in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan, drug policy and global poverty.

Hayden was married to actress Jane Fonda from 1973 to 1990, with whom he had two children. Midway through their marriage, the couple graced the cover of People Magazine.


In later years his writings were published in national publications including The New York Times, the Boston Globe and the Denver Post. He served on the editorial board and was a columnist for The Nation magazine, and was the author of more than 20 books.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tom-hayden-dead-anti-war-activist_us_580da8f7e4b0a03911ed72bc?section=


RE: Obituaries - Odin - 10-24-2016

One of the best of the War Babies. May he RIP. Sad


RE: Obituaries - Eric the Green - 10-24-2016

My leader. Sorry to hear this. Best wishes on the other side Tom.


RE: Obituaries - gabrielle - 10-24-2016

Jack Chick Passes Away

Quote:Cartoonist Jack Chick has passed away at the age of 92, according to a Facebook post made by Chick Publications.

Chick was known for his small comic strip booklets, called "Chick tracts," that warned of social dangers through the lens of Chick's fundamentalist Christian beliefs.

Chick tracts warned of the dangers of everything from rock music, to Freemasonry, to Catholicism, Judaism, and Islam. One of Chick's most famous works, "Dark Dungeons," which espoused Chick's belief that roleplaying games such as Dungeons & Dragons were tools of Satanism, was adapted into an independent short film in 2014.

Chick Publications estimates that it has printed over 800 million copies of its well known tracts. 

[Image: Dark_Dungoens.jpg]


RIP Jack Chick--Here's his top 5 most homophobic tracts


RE: Obituaries - gabrielle - 10-24-2016

(10-24-2016, 03:04 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: RIP Pete Burns:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3868030/Singer-Pete-Burns-dies-heart-attack-aged-57.html

"Singer Pete Burns has died aged 57, his manager has confirmed. 

"In a statement on Twitter, his manager said: 'It is with the greatest sadness that we have to break the tragic news that our beloved Pete Burns of (Dead Or Alive) died suddenly yesterday of a massive cardiac arrest.' "


====================

I'll always remember him the way he looked back in the mid 80s.

Cosmetic surgery was the demon which ultimately did him in.

Sad to hear.






RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-25-2016

(10-25-2016, 10:36 AM)X_4AD_84 Wrote:
(10-24-2016, 11:37 PM)gabrielle Wrote: Jack Chick Passes Away

Quote:Cartoonist Jack Chick has passed away at the age of 92, according to a Facebook post made by Chick Publications.

Chick was known for his small comic strip booklets, called "Chick tracts," that warned of social dangers through the lens of Chick's fundamentalist Christian beliefs.

Chick tracts warned of the dangers of everything from rock music, to Freemasonry, to Catholicism, Judaism, and Islam. One of Chick's most famous works, "Dark Dungeons," which espoused Chick's belief that roleplaying games such as Dungeons & Dragons were tools of Satanism, was adapted into an independent short film in 2014.

Chick Publications estimates that it has printed over 800 million copies of its well known tracts. 

 
[Image: Dark_Dungoens.jpg]


RIP Jack Chick--Here's his top 5 most homophobic tracts

D&D ... oh my! I can see it now ... Satanic Demon Geeks taking over the world! Tongue

What a dreadful, petty, intolerant man!

Man is powerless against the occult and against religion other than fundamentalist Protestantism unless he accepts the narrow bigotry of Jack Chick. If you do not live in the abject fear of the LORD as such as Jack Chick understands it, which is the cloying fear appropriate for living under a tyrant like Josef Stalin, then one is doomed to the worst Gulag ever known -- Hell.

It's all the argument to fear, one of the most obnoxious fallacies to have ever existed.


The god who dangles us over a vat of sulfuric acid deserves rebellion -- not faith. Such a god is no better than a crime lord.

May the LORD have mercy upon this sick soul.


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-27-2016

Robert Anderson "Bob" Hoover (January 24, 1922 – October 25, 2016) was an air show pilot, United States Air Force test pilot and fighter pilot.[1] Known as the "pilot's pilot", Hoover revolutionized modern aerobatic flying and was referred to in many aviation circles as one of the greatest pilots ever to have lived.[2][3][4]


[Image: 220px-Bob_Hoover_2005_Gathering_of_Eagle...ograph.jpg]

Bob Hoover 2005 Gathering of Eagles Lithograph

Hoover learned to fly at Nashville's Berry Field while working at a local grocery store to pay for the flight training.[5] He enlisted in the Tennessee National Guard and was sent for pilot training with the Army.[6]

During World War II, Hoover was sent to Casablanca, where his first major assignment was flight testing the assembled aircraft ready for service.[7] He was later assigned to the Spitfire-equipped 52d Fighter Group in Sicily.[8] On February 9, 1944, on his 59th mission, his malfunctioning Mark V Spitfire was shot down by 96-victory ace Ltn Siegfried Lemke of JG 2[9] in a Focke-Wulf Fw 190 off the coast of Southern France, and he was taken prisoner.[10] He spent 16 months at the German prison camp Stalag Luft 1 in Barth, Germany.[11]
After a staged fight covered his escape from the prison camp, Hoover managed to steal a Fw 190 from a recovery unit's unguarded field (the one flyable plane being kept there for spare parts) and flew to safety in the Netherlands.[12] He was assigned to flight-test duty at Wright Field after the war. There he impressed and befriended Chuck Yeager.[13] When Yeager was later asked whom he wanted for flight crew for the supersonic Bell X-1 flight, he named Hoover. Hoover became Yeager's backup pilot in the Bell X-1 program and flew chase for Yeager in a Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star during the Mach 1 flight.[14] He also flew chase for the 50th anniversary of the Mach 1 flight in a General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon.[15]

Hoover left the Air Force for civilian jobs in 1948.[16] After a brief time with Allison Engine Company, he worked as a test/demonstration pilot with North American Aviation, in which capacity he went to Korea to teach pilots in the Korean War how to dive-bomb with the F-86 Sabre. During his six weeks in Korea, Hoover flew many combat bombing missions over enemy territory but was denied permission to engage in air-to-air combat flights.[17] During the 1950s, Hoover visited many active-duty, reserve and Air National Guard units to demonstrate planes' capabilities to their pilots. Hoover flew flight tests on the FJ-1 Fury, F-86 Sabre, and the F-100 Super Sabre.

In the early 1960s, Hoover began flying the North American P-51 Mustang at air shows around the country. The Hoover Mustang (N2251D) was purchased by North American Aviation from Dave Lindsay's Cavalier Aircraft Corp. in 1962. A second Mustang (N51RH), later named "Ole Yeller", was purchased by North American Rockwell from Cavalier in 1971 to replace the earlier aircraft, which had been destroyed in a ground accident when an oxygen bottle exploded after being overfilled. Hoover demonstrated the Mustang and later the Aero Commander at hundreds of air shows until his retirement in the 1990s. In 1997, Hoover sold "Ole Yeller" to his good friend John Bagley of Rexburg, Idaho. "Ole Yeller" still flies frequently and is based at the Legacy Flight Museum[18] in Rexburg.
Hoover set records for transcontinental and time-to-climb speed,[19] and personally knew such great aviators as Orville Wright, Eddie Rickenbacker, Charles Lindbergh, Jimmy Doolittle, Chuck Yeager, Jacqueline Cochran, Neil Armstrong and Yuri Gagarin.[20]

Hoover was best known for his civil air show career, which started when he was hired to demonstrate the capabilities of Aero Commander's Shrike Commander, a twin piston-engined business aircraft that had developed a rather staid reputation due to its bulky shape. Hoover showed the strength of the plane as he put the aircraft through rolls, loops and other maneuvers, which most people would not associate with executive aircraft. As a grand finale, he shut down both engines and executed a loop and an eight-point hesitation slow roll as he headed back to the runway. He touched down on one tire, then the other, before landing. After pulling off the runway, he would start engines to taxi back to the parking area. On airfields with large enough parking ramps (such as the Reno Stead Airport, where the Reno Air Races take place), Hoover would sometimes land directly on the ramp and coast all the way back to his parking spot in front of the grandstand without restarting the engines.

[Image: 220px-HooverMustang.jpg]

"Ole Yeller," flown by John Bagley at an air show in Rexburg, Idaho.

His air show aerobatics career ended over medical concerns, when Hoover's medical certificate was revoked by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the early 1990s.[21][22]

Shortly before his revocation, Hoover experienced serious engine problems in a North American T-28 Trojan off the coast of California. During his return to Torrance, he was able to keep the engine running intermittently by constantly manipulating the throttle, mixture and propeller lever. The engine seized at the moment of touchdown. Hoover believed his successful management of this difficult emergency should have convinced the FAA that he hadn't lost any ability.[23] Meanwhile, Hoover was granted a pilot's license, and medical certificate, by Australia's aviation authorities.[24] Hoover's medical certificate was restored shortly afterward and he returned to the American air show circuit for several years before retiring in 1999. The 77-year old Hoover still felt capable of performing and had recently passed a rigorous FAA physical, but he was unable to obtain insurance for air shows. Although he had had free insurance for several years as part of air show sponsorship deals, he was forced in 1999 to pay for it out of his own pocket and could not get coverage under $2 million. His final show was Sun'N'Fun 2000 in Lakeland, Florida, where he did not perform any aerobatics.[22]


[Image: 220px-HooverShrike.JPG]

Bob Hoover's Shrike Commander at the Udvar-Hazy Center

Following Hoover's retirement, his Shrike Commander was placed on display at the National Air and Space Museum, Udvar-Hazy Center, in Dulles, Virginia.[25]


Hoover was considered one of the founding fathers of modern aerobatics and was described by Jimmy Doolittle as "the greatest stick-and-rudder man who ever lived".[26] In the Centennial of Flight edition of Air & Space/Smithsonian, he was named the third greatest aviator in history.

During his career, Hoover was awarded the following military medals: the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Soldier's Medal for non-combat valor, the Air Medal with several oak leaf clusters, the Purple Heart and the French Croix de Guerre.[27] He was also made an honorary member of the Blue Angels, the Thunderbirds, the RCAF Snowbirds, the American Fighter Aces Association, and the original Eagle Squadron and received an Award of Merit from the American Fighter Pilots Association.[27] He was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Famein 1988 and to the Aerospace Walk of Honor in 1992.[28]
Hoover received the Living Legends of Aviation Freedom of Flight Award in 2006, which was renamed the Bob Hoover Freedom of Flight Award the following year. In 2007, he received the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Trophy.[26][29]
On May 18, 2010, Hoover delivered the 2010 Charles A. Lindbergh Memorial Lecture at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. The U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School conferred an honorary doctorate on Hoover at the school's December 2010 graduation ceremony.[30] Flying magazine placed Hoover number 10 on its list of "The 51 Heroes of Aviation" in 2013.[2]

On December 12, 2014, at the Aero Club of Washington's 67th annual Wright Memorial Dinner, Hoover was awarded the National Aeronautic Association's Wright Brothers Memorial Trophy.

Flying The Feathered Edge: The Bob Hoover Project

Hoover's decades of fantastic flying formed the framework for the 2014 documentary film, Flying The Feathered Edge: The Bob Hoover Project, in which Hoover's likeable personality was the star. Hoover received a standing ovation from the crowd of about 100 at the invitation-only preview during EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, July 2014.[31]

Harrison Ford and aerobatic legend Sean D. Tucker frame the documentary about the beloved aviation pioneer.[32] The film begins with a tribute to Bob's flying skills by Neil Armstrong, and it stars Harrison Ford, Burt Rutan, Dick Rutan, Carroll Shelby, Gene Cernan, Medal of Honor Recipient Col. George E. Bud Day, Clay Lacy and Sean D. Tucker, among others.[33]

Flying the Feathered Edge is a highly researched three-year project.[34] The film tells Hoover's story from his first flying lessons before World War II to his combat and postwar careers as a test pilot and air show legend.[33] Aviation Week reporter Fred George's review stated, "After 90 minutes there were few dry eyes in the house as the credits rolled at the end of the documentary ... in 'Aviation Week''s opinion, a film well worth our reader's viewing time when it appears in nearby theaters."[35]The film premiered August 2014 at the Rhode Island International Film Festival at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium (Providence) in Providence, Rhode Island,[33] winning the "Grand Prize, Soldiers and Sacrifice Award."[36] The film received the Combs/Gates Award from the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2015 [37] for excellence in preserving aerospace history.

A perhaps-undesired recognition for the late pilot is the "Hoover Nozzle" used on jet fuel pumps. The Hoover Nozzle is designed with a flattened bell shape. The Hoover Nozzle cannot be inserted in the filler neck of a plane with the "Hoover Ring" installed, thus preventing the tank from accidentally being filled with jet fuel.

This system was given this name following an accident in which Hoover was seriously injured, when both engines on his Shrike Commander failed during takeoff. Investigators found that the plane had just been fueled by line personnel who mistook the piston-engine Shrike for a similar turboprop model, filling the tanks with jet fuel instead of avgas (aviation gasoline).[38] There was enough avgas in the fuel system to taxi to the runway and take off, but then the jet fuel was drawn into the engines, causing them to stop.


Once Hoover recovered, he widely promoted[39] the use of the new type of nozzle with the support and funding of the National Air Transportation Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association and various other aviation groups (the nozzle is now required by Federal regulation on jet fuel pumps).[40][41]


RE: Obituaries - pbrower2a - 10-31-2016

The songwriter of "The Green, Green Grass of Home"

Claude "Curly" Putman, Jr. (November 20, 1930 – October 30, 2016) was an American songwriter, based in Nashville. Born in Princeton, Jackson County, Alabama, his biggest success was "Green, Green Grass of Home"



...A man returns to his childhood home; it seems that this is his first visit home since leaving in his youth. When he steps down from the train, his parents are there to greet him, and his beloved, Mary, comes running to join them. All is welcome and peace; all come to meet him with "arms reaching, smiling sweetly." With Mary the man strolls at ease among the monuments of his childhood, including "the old oak tree that I used to play on." It is "good to touch the green, green grass of home." Yet the music and the words are full of foreshadowing, strongly suggestive of mourning.

Abruptly, the man switches from song to speech as he awakens in prison: "Then I awake and look around me, at four grey walls that surround me. And I realize that I was only dreaming." He is, indeed, on death row. As the singing resumes, we learn that the man is waking on the day of his scheduled execution[3] ("there's a guard, and there's a sad old padre, arm in arm, we'll walk at daybreak"), and he will return home only to be buried: "Yes, they'll all come to see me in the shade of that old oak tree, as they lay me 'neath the green, green grass of home."

The Joan Baez version ends: "Yes, we'll all be together in the shade of the old oak tree / When we meet beneath the green, green grass of home."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green,_Green_Grass_of_Home