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the best songs ever


1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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The kiwi jumped way behind for a great one, but I'm going to fall into a Ring of Fire. Johnny Cash recorded this other great country-rock crossover hit from Spring 1963. There seems to be wide agreement with me about this choice. It is full of sexual innuendo, but it's not intentional. But it burns, burns, burns.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_of_Fire_(song)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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This nifty oldie from early 1963 has do-wop and mighty-fine organ sounds, and whatever happened to Barbara Lewis? How long, has it been? Seems like a mighty-long time, my baby. My last pick from 1963 as far as I know.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hello_Stranger
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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I have fewer picks from 1962, and from then backwards; although with classical music it doesn't matter, because the pieces are way longer. But 1962 was certainly the year for pop instrumentals. "Stranger on the Shore" by Mr. Acker Bilk was probably recorded chronologically first, and reminds me of Borodin's "Stranger in Paradise," which is a top classical fave of mine. And it's right next to "Hello Stranger " on my top 400 list. To say this was a big hit would be an understatement; it was apparently the top selling single of 1962. Plaudits to the people of 1962 for supporting good instrumentals! It was a good year, generally speaking, in many ways. Jackie Kennedy certainly was encouraging the arts at this time, in her "camelot" administration.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stranger_on_the_Shore
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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(08-19-2016, 11:43 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: The kiwi jumped way behind for a great one, but I'm going to fall into a Ring of Fire. Johnny Cash recorded this other great country-rock crossover hit from Spring 1963. There seems to be wide agreement with me about this choice. It is full of sexual innuendo, but it's not intentional. But it burns, burns, burns.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_of_Fire_(song)
Clearly you are ignoring her immense talent
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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I am glad kiwi boomers are Appolonian and not Dionysian like Eric. I would not be able to stand that cultural arrogance and ignorance of anything but their way. How destructive.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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The best by the Tijuana Brass is this early hit from 1962.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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This one was a pioneering piece celebrating a satellite. Not only goose-bumpy, but imaginative in its instrumentation. I like this, from a year when everybody celebrated space flight and tech, the year of the Seattle world's fair and the space needle, the Jetsons, and John Glenn and Scott Carpenter. Telstar!





notes from the video:
Uploaded on Nov 22, 2008
Telstar is a 1962 instrumental record performed by The Tornados. It was the first single by a British band to reach number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and was also a number one hit in the UK. The record was named after the AT&T communications satellite Telstar, which went into orbit in July 1962. The song was released five weeks later on 17 August 1962. It was written and produced by Joe Meek, and featured a clavioline, a keyboard instrument with a distinctive electronic sound.
This novelty record was intended to evoke the dawn of the space age, complete with sound effects that were meant to sound "space-like". A popular story at the time of the record's release was that the weird distortions and background noise came from sending the signal up to the Telstar satellite and re-recording it back on Earth. It is more likely that the effects were created in Meek's recording studio, which was a small flat above a shop in London. It has been claimed that the sounds intended to symbolize radio signals were produced by Meek running a pen around the rim of an ashtray, and that the "rocket blastoff" at the start of the record was actually a flushing toilet, with the recordings made to sound exotic by playing the tape in reverse at various speeds.
The record was an immediate hit after its release on August 17, 1962, remaining in the UK pop charts for 25 weeks, five of them at number one, and in the American charts for 16 weeks.

A French composer, Jean Ledrut, accused Joe Meek of plagiarism, claiming that the tune of "Telstar" had been copied from La Marche d'Austerlitz, a piece from a score that Ledrut had written for the 1960 film Austerlitz. This led to a lawsuit that prevented Meek from receiving royalties from the record during his lifetime, and the issue was not resolved in Meek's favour until a year after his death in 1967. It is unlikely that Meek was aware of Austerlitz, as it had been released only in France at the time.

"Telstar" won an Ivor Novello Award and is estimated to have sold at least five million copies worldwide.

honorable mention for 1962, another fine instrumental:
https://youtu.be/DOFV0lHxUOw Exodus by Ferrante & Teicher
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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I've always thought, even though it came out when I myself just started following the Giants, that this is one of the best fight songs I have ever heard. It's melody is just so perfect, and it also exists in an instrumental version.





"Bye Bye Baby" and the three variations on the "Sound Of The City" theme — "The Beat Of San Francisco," "Bolero" and "Madrigal" — were credited to Hugh Heller and Allyn Ferguson, who had created arrangements for Count Basie, Rosemary Clooney, Sarah Vaughn and Johnny Mathis over the years. For many years, Heller-Ferguson, Inc., of Hollywood was one of the leading production companies for radio stations and advertising agencies.

In addition, Hugh Heller served as a manager for many artists, including Don Sherwood and Johnny Mann. A graduate of San Jose State University, he was leader of his own dance orchestra while still a student, and succeeded Bob Hansen as KSFO's program director in July 1959. He later served as director of programs for co-owned Golden West station KMPC/710, Los Angeles.

But while the publishing credit for "Bye Bye Baby" shows Ferguson-Heller, longtime Giants broadcaster Russ Hodges gave credit in his 1963 autobiography to a KSFO newsman for having penned the ditty:

"This melody, which was conceived one day in 1962 by Aaron Edwards, a popular KSFO announcer, is hardly a classic in the mold of 'On Wisconsin' or 'The Washington Post March,' but it doesn't sound bad when it's played loudly enough, and it's easy to sing. People at the ball park get plenty of chances to sing it because whenever something good happens to the club, Lloyd Fox belts it out on the organ weekdays while Del Courtney and his band play it on Sundays."

The flipside of the record, cleverly entitled "The Other Side," was a collection of bloopers from failed attempts to record "Man On The Street" promos for the station. Starring Don Sherwood as a variety of characters and Jack Carney as his patient foil, the recording session collapses into a parade of honking horns, meant to hide all of the "shame-shame words," as Sherwood discreetly calls them.

At the time of this recording, KSFO could boast a first-rate stable of talent that made it the highest-rated station in the Bay Area, if not truly "The World's Greatest Radio Station," as it proclaimed itself to be. As pictured on the inner gatefold of the record sleeve, the team assembled by KSFO general manager Bill Shaw and program director Al Newman included Don Sherwood, Jim Lange, Del Courtney, Herb Kennedy, Jack Carney and Al Collins.

http://bayarearadio.org/audio/ksfo/ksfo_...city.shtml

("Bye Bye Baby" was Russ Hodges' home run call. He also announced the "shot heard round the world," Bobby Thompson's home run that beat the Dodgers for the pennant in 1951)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Town Without Pity, award winning movie theme and hit record, very popular oldie here in SF. First and best hit by Gene Pitney.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Town_Without_Pity_(song)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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I wasn't sure if this one from 1964 is up to snuff. Borderline case I guess, and there's so much already from 1964. But I always thought it was magical.





So, I thought I would group "He's in Town" with this one from 1961 that everyone knows. It's an English version of a 1920s South African song.





Here they are today:
http://www.thetokens.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tokens

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lion_Sleeps_Tonight
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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My favorite from the oldies but goodies era, 1956 to 1962. Crying by Roy Orbison. Summer/Fall 1961





The kiwi already posted this song, but I'm posting it again. Great singer; great song.

Dave Marsh calls the song a "rock-bolero" with "blaring strings, hammered tympani, a ghostly chorus, the gentle strum of a guitar, [and] a hint of marimba"....
The song was released as a 45-rpm single by Monument Records in July 1961 and reached No. 1 on the United States Cashbox chart for a week on October 7, 1961, and peaking at No. 2 on the rival Billboard Hot 100. Despite not reaching the summit in the latter publication, Billboard ranked the record as the No. 4 song of 1961....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crying_(Roy_Orbison_song)

My next post, however, is a different song I like equally well.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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1960 was a huge year for the old rock n roll. The Twist, Tossin and Turnin, It's Now or Never; huge hits. And this one (actually Feb. 1961), is like what John Lennon did on " I Should Have Known Better "; episodic melody that takes you to unexpected highs. And just like the Beach Boys introduced the theramin on "Good Vibrations," Del Shannon (Charles Westover) introduced Max Crook's invention of a clavioline-based electric keyboard called a Musitron. It was a "Runaway" hit. It's the archetypal oldie-but-goodie too!





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runaway_(D...nnon_song)


A different version: https://youtu.be/ziLagAgoPCE

I see that The Beatles and The Beach Boys each performed "Runaway" a year or two before the songs by them that I mentioned. So did Elvis, introducing Del in the audience.

Unfortunately, Del had a hard time staying on top, and never had such a big hit again. His mid-60s song, "Keep Searching," was not as good, but it did OK.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Del_Shannon

Circa 1960 was the time when lots of macho white guys made it as rock n roll singers and teen idols for a while. Besides Del Shannon, there was Bobby Vee, who did a fine song called "Keep on Trying" in 1965. The DJ said that that's what Bobby was doing, since he hadn't had a hit since 1960-61, when he did "Rubber Ball" and "Take Good Care of My Baby." But in 1967 he finally hit again with "Come Back When You Grow Up." I guess he was all grown up by then. Bobby played with Bob Dylan in his early days.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Vee

The macho Dion did "Runaround Sue," circa 1960, but in 1968 sang the most poignant tribute to Abraham, Martin, John and Bobby. A fine classic song that didn't quite make my list.
https://youtu.be/a5hFMy4pTrs

Bobby Rydell was another one. Of course, the guy from everybody's favorite family, the Nelsons (Ricky). Fabian, and Bobby Darin "Splish Splash." Macho teen idols. How different did the idols become just a few years later, after the mop tops had swept through! How much more freedom of expression and style afterward, from the limited macho image that was pretty much the same for all young guys then.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Honorable mention, early-60s oldies:

He's A Rebel, by The Crystals (1962) https://youtu.be/aF7V2dSvxpo
Two Faces Have I, by Lou Christie (1963) https://youtu.be/w05w1XbZTG8
Monster Mash, by Bobby Boris Picket (1962) https://youtu.be/vNuVifA7DSU
Only the Lonely, by Roy Orbison (1960) https://youtu.be/qzVfA7obzko
Breaking Up Is Hard To Do, by Neil Sedaka (1960) https://youtu.be/tbad22CKlB4
Calendar Girl, by Neil Sedaka (early 1961) https://youtu.be/tbad22CKlB4
Theme from a Summer Place, by Percy Faith (1960) https://youtu.be/tSsiS-v6_6M

Baby Boomer Radio: oldies internet radio.
http://www.babyboomerradio.com/oldies.php
They miss a few, of course, and over-emphasize some artists, of course, but it's a pretty good list.
Direct from Route 66.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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1959 was a weak year, and in fact IMO the 1950s are weaker than the 1960s. But I think it was a year for some mellow soulful songs, like this one:
The Flamingos: I Only Have Eyes for You (a hauntingly beautiful performance of a song originally written in 1934),

and I already posted The Fleetwoods: Come Softly To Me
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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One of mine and everybody's favorite golden oldies is It's All in the Game by Tommy Edwards.





The song has an interesting history, with the melody having been written in 1911 by a future US vice-president, and other notable singers including Edwards in 1951 having made other versions. The 1958 version is considered a "rock n roll arrangement" and was a huge hit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_All...ame_(song)

Some other 1958 golden oldies that I also liked:
All I Have to Do is Dream by The Everly Brothers
The Stripper by David Rose (recorded 1958, released 1962, the great year for pop instrumentals)
Johnny B. Goode by Chuck Berry, with its famous opening guitar riff
Sweet Little Sixteen by Chuck Berry (melody for Surfin' USA, of course)
Yakety Yak by The Coasters
Charlie Brown by The Coasters
The Witch Doctor by David Seville (loved these 3 songs when I was 8!)
cover, 2007, and live on Ed Sullivan "the national rage among all the youngsters"

grab your hula hoop and come back to 1958!
(but I won't post the One-Eyed, One-Horned Flying Purple People Eater, or the Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini! (1960))

(note: none of these except the embedded one actually made my top 400+ list, but I might add Johnny B Goode to it as a runner up)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_B._Goode

an oldies playlist https://youtu.be/rBQ2xc6jjJs?list=PLCFEB3C06C87F6748
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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1958 with this beautiful song. Can't go wrong with The Platters.






Nor Cliff Richard



1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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1957 was the best year for a major rock n roll figure, Buddy Holly. He is well-known and influential, ahead of his time. His band The Crickets was the basis of the name The Beatles adopted. Buddy and the Crickets were the first four member guitar/drums band. His "stuttering" vocal style is still imitated, and I think his timeless melodies transcend the styles of the early rock n roll era that he helped create.

The last of my picks of his songs chronologically was "Oh Boy" https://youtu.be/apgL0QcoXIc
The B side was Not Fade Away, which was also the first hit for the Rolling Stones (posted earlier for 1964).

My favorite Buddy Holly song is "Everyday" https://youtu.be/t2QODf1NNwY which is not on my list because I didn't know about it. It was the B-side of "Peggy Sue," a huge hit that must have been the most over-played oldie on our radio station, along with Little Darlin' by the Diamonds. I still don't like that one, but I got to like Peggy Sue OK. It has a great guitar instrumental section. https://youtu.be/ZPXuZ355780

His #1 hit was That'll Be the Day.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Holly

As most people know, his life was cut short in February 1959 by a plane crash that also killed Richie Valens (LaBamba) and the Big Bopper J.P. Richardson (Chantilly Lace). It was "the day the music died" according to Don McLean in the epic, poetic song American Pie from 1972, one of the most popular songs ever, which I like but is not one of my picks.
The meaning of American Pie https://youtu.be/VsZFiMo8TIc
I always thought American Pie was as much about the mood of circa 1970 as about 1959. It all comes together I guess in this "song about America" in this time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddy_Holly_discography
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Another great singer whose life was cut short, murdered in 1964. What's with it with some of these singers? I like his songs, including "A Change is gonna Come" released posthumously in late 1964, but this is my favorite, "You, ooh ooh ooo, Send Me":





video comment: Sam Cooke's vocals are like a cool breeze blowing across the sands of time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Cooke
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Sam Cooke wrote and performed A Wonderful World, recorded in 1959 and released in 1960. British invasion group Herman's Hermits covered it in 1965. They also did "Mrs. Brown, You've Got as Lovely Daughter" (big smash hit) and "Can't you Hear My Heart Beat" (runner-up on my list). Another song with a similar name was released in 1967, but was blocked by ABC's record company exec from being promoted in the USA, so I never heard it until the late 1980s, when it was re-released and played by my friends at the radio station I also hosted/programmed on then. I thought this song probably was something from the early 1950s, so I didn't insert it into the proper 1967 or 1988 places on these threads. It has grown on me, because everybody seems to love it, and everybody loved Louis Armstrong.





I have to admit, it's an uplifting and beautiful song.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What_a_Wonderful_World

Israel Kamakawiwo'ole – Over The Rainbow & What A Wonderful World – 1993
https://youtu.be/Z26BvHOD_sg
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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