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Music that gives me goosebumps. (sorry Eric, it is not your type of music I am sure).
#21
Watch out, Georg will attack!



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#22
Big Grin                                                                        exists!"
                                                              really
                                    the impossible
                   to prove
"I'm going



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#23
(06-05-2016, 12:14 AM)gabrielle Wrote: Watch out, Georg will attack!




Wow! Now that is cool! Thanks for sharing!
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#24


1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#25


1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#26
It takes an hour. In a very bad moment this expansive delicacy took me back from the Edge -- I have no desire to say what that Edge was.






Just a reminder that music can make life worthy of the struggle with pervasive nastiness.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#27
(06-07-2016, 06:46 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: It takes an hour. In a very bad moment this expansive delicacy took me back from the Edge -- I have no desire to say what that Edge was.






Just a reminder that music can make life worthy of the struggle with pervasive nastiness.

Your link does not work.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#28
Replaced the link.

Now here's another masterwork, arguably the greatest first symphony that anyone ever wrote -- and I know about Beethoven, Brahms, and Sibelius.

For those of us who pay attention to the generational theory, this symphony well fits the idealized life cycle of a member of an Idealist -- carefree, but gently (if wisely) guided youth of an outer-directed era, iconoclastic young adulthood of an awakening era, a deadly-serious midlife during an inner-directed era, and an apocalyptic old age during a Crisis Era. At the end one gets portents of the next era when everything seems solved once and for all.

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), who went into oblivion about when he died and was the perfect composer for Boomers to rediscover. The definitive expression of Idealism in music.










The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#29
The last chords suggest this image courtesy of the United States Army on April 25, 1945 in Nuremberg, Germany:



The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#30
(06-07-2016, 05:20 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: The last chords suggest this image courtesy of the United States Army:




I don't know what is up with your links but they do not work. Your first one does at least. How strange. They only work if I am responding to them.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#31
(06-07-2016, 05:17 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Replaced the link.

Now here's another masterwork, arguably the greatest first symphony that anyone ever wrote -- and I know about Beethoven, Brahms, and Sibelius.

For those of us who pay attention to the generational theory, this symphony well fits the idealized life cycle of a member of an Idealist -- carefree, but gently (if wisely) guided youth of an outer-directed era, iconoclastic young adulthood of an awakening era, a deadly-serious midlife during an inner-directed era, and an apocalyptic old age during a Crisis Era. At the end one gets portents of the next era when everything seems solved once and for all.

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), who went into oblivion about when he died and was the perfect composer for Boomers to rediscover. The definitive expression of Idealism in music.











How is it idealistic?
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#32
(06-07-2016, 06:01 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 05:17 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Replaced the link.

Now here's another masterwork, arguably the greatest first symphony that anyone ever wrote -- and I know about Beethoven, Brahms, and Sibelius.

For those of us who pay attention to the generational theory, this symphony well fits the idealized life cycle of a member of an Idealist -- carefree, but gently (if wisely) guided youth of an outer-directed era, iconoclastic young adulthood of an awakening era, a deadly-serious midlife during an inner-directed era, and an apocalyptic old age during a Crisis Era. At the end one gets portents of the next era when everything seems solved once and for all.

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), who went into oblivion about when he died and was the perfect composer for Boomers to rediscover. The definitive expression of Idealism in music.

How is it idealistic?

It seems to fit the pattern of the Idealist life-cycle at its best.

...Off hand I can't think of a symphony that would catch the Reactive life-cycle: ecstasy by others that one can neither understand or partake in (2T) as a child, being exploited and neglected as an adult in a 3T, finally getting one's stuff together in the Crisis Era, and going off to oblivion (riding off to the sunset or being shoved into a "rest home" because one is inconvenient to have around in old age). Or as a Civic, being a child in a chaotic, hardscrabble world (which is how I see the young lives of the GI generation), being thrust into heroism for which one is surprisingly-well prepared, coming back from heroic deeds only to push too far too fast (1T), only to find oneself under criticism from young adults who see the hero to have feet of clay in an Awakening and then seeing the world fall apart. For an Adaptive generation, begin with distant danger about which one can do little, then coming of age with nothing stronger than whimsy as expression in a 1T, then trying to act younger than one is and doing so awkwardly in an Awakening Era, then seeing the world get ugly in a 3T and then (if one lives to an advanced age) sees the distant danger that one can do nothing about because one is too old instead of too young.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#33
(06-07-2016, 07:21 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 06:01 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(06-07-2016, 05:17 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Replaced the link.

Now here's another masterwork, arguably the greatest first symphony that anyone ever wrote -- and I know about Beethoven, Brahms, and Sibelius.

For those of us who pay attention to the generational theory, this symphony well fits the idealized life cycle of a member of an Idealist -- carefree, but gently (if wisely) guided youth of an outer-directed era, iconoclastic young adulthood of an awakening era, a deadly-serious midlife during an inner-directed era, and an apocalyptic old age during a Crisis Era. At the end one gets portents of the next era when everything seems solved once and for all.

Gustav Mahler (1860-1911), who went into oblivion about when he died and was the perfect composer for Boomers to rediscover. The definitive expression of Idealism in music.

How is it idealistic?

It seems to fit the pattern of the Idealist life-cycle at its best.

...Off hand I can't think of a symphony that would catch the Reactive life-cycle: ecstasy by others that one can neither understand or partake in (2T) as a child, being exploited and neglected as an adult in a 3T, finally getting one's stuff together in the Crisis Era, and going off to oblivion (riding off to the sunset or being shoved into a "rest home" because one is inconvenient to have around in old age). Or as a Civic, being a child in a chaotic, hardscrabble world (which is how I see the young lives of the GI generation), being thrust into heroism for which one is surprisingly-well prepared, coming back from heroic deeds only to push too far too fast (1T), only to find oneself under criticism from young adults who see the hero to have feet of clay in an Awakening and then seeing the world fall apart. For an Adaptive generation, begin with distant danger about which one can do little, then coming of age with nothing stronger than whimsy as expression in a 1T, then trying to act younger than one is and doing so awkwardly in an Awakening Era, then seeing the world get ugly in a 3T and then (if one lives to an advanced age) sees the distant danger that one can do nothing about because one is too old instead of too young.

smh the hero life cycle never fails to depress me. As to the the symphony I will have to listen to it for a bit later to see what you mean.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#34
Harp transcription of Bach's most famous viola piece - not that I've ever heard it played on viola.



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#35
It was originally written for solo violin. We have most commonly heard it in its usual transcription for organ. Apparently it was too difficult for many violinists to play, and Bach transcribed it for organ so that others could play it. It has also been transcribed for symphony or4chestra, most famously by Stokowski for the introduction to Disney's original Fantasia. I thought it completely unsuited to piano until I heard Idil Biret play it convincingly. Lest we forget -- it's a favorite for synthesizers. I don;t know about marching bands, brass ensembles or drum-and-fife corps, or wind ensembles. Glass harmonica, anyone?

Solo harp? Wow!
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#36
Redoing some stuff from when I didn't quite get the cut-and-paste right from videos.


Quite possibly the creepiest piece of classical music (A Night on Bald Mountain/A Night on Bare Mountain):





1933 animation, and the recording is from much later. The video works this time.

Nearly perfect background music... for a KKK rally and night ride, which would be even scarier.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#37
Toccata and Fugue, d minor, J S Bach.

Yes, band. I was going to get a performance at a college half-time show, but the acoustics were awful and there was much audience noise.

Here's a really-good non-professional treatment by the University of Michigan Symphony Band. No strings attached. (Get it?) No audience noise, and acoustics are not those of a stadium.



The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#38
Always great to hear. And I can play it too. But it is an original organ piece, not viola or violin. The word toccata means a keyboard piece, btw.

There's some fascinating history to this piece too.

Some deny that it was by Bach; can you imagine? Actually, one proof that Toccata and Fugue in D Minor S. 565 was written by Bach, is that the theme itself wasn't entirely written by Bach. Ol' J S took a brief passage from an organ Fantasy in D Minor by Pachelbel, inserted it into the Fugue verbatim, and expanded it by adding a phrase after it, equal in length. Pachelbel had done nothing with it; it was just sort of a random phrase. Bach took his phrase and made this elaborate, consistent, and fabulous masterpiece out of it, in which virtually every note is derived from the theme.

Pachelbel, composer of the famous 3-part Canon in D Major, was a friend of the Bach family, and a direct influence on J.S. Bach. The Canon was in fact composed for the wedding of Bach's uncle, who was J.S. Bach's teacher. Pachelbel's organ works were much simpler than Bach's; nevertheless, they were among the raw materials for his own. The Prelude and Fugue in D Major S. 532 is a reworking of and elaboration on Pachelbel's Fugue in D Major, for example, and Pachelbel's Toccatas in C Major invented the technique Bach used in his great F Major Toccata S. 540 of the held pedal note with a long linear passage over it. Another one. And here's Pachelbel's Toccata in F.

But here's the rub, man! Bach famously did exactly the same thing to compose his famous Passacaglia S. 582, taking a theme by Raison and expanding it with a phrase of equal length after it, and making a masterpiece out of what had been a trifle. So, it was a characteristic method of Bach. And what's more, Bach took a phrase from his own Toccata and Fugue in D Minor S. 565, and used it in turn as the theme for his great Fugue in G Minor S. 542, which is preceded by a haunting Fantasy reminiscent of the Toccata in D Minor.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#39
(06-24-2017, 11:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: It was originally written for solo violin. We have most commonly heard it in its usual transcription for organ. Apparently it was too difficult for many violinists to play, and Bach transcribed it for organ so that others could play it. It has also been transcribed for symphony or4chestra, most famously by Stokowski for the introduction to Disney's original Fantasia. I thought it completely unsuited to piano until I heard Idil Biret play it convincingly. Lest we forget -- it's a favorite for synthesizers. I don;t know about marching bands, brass ensembles or drum-and-fife corps, or wind ensembles. Glass harmonica, anyone?

I believe the theory is that it was originally written in A minor for violin, and transcribed to D minor, possibly by someone other than Bach, for organ.  That would explain the lack of counterpoint, which lack is uncharacteristic of Bach organ works.  When transcribed to A minor, it's actually very well suited to violin, with lots of use of open strings and easy double stops; it's not a trivial piece, but not particularly difficult either.  Here's a performance of an A minor violin reconstruction:





My question is, why change it to D minor when transcribing for organ?  It seems to me more likely that it was originally written in D minor for viola - which would be played exactly like an A minor version on violin - and transcribed for organ without changing the key.
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#40
(06-24-2017, 11:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Solo harp? Wow!

Ivanova was amazing; it's a pity she quit performing.  Here she is at age 6:





Also, audio only of a Chopin piece that must have been even more technically challenging for harp than the Bach:



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