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Music that gives me goosebumps. (sorry Eric, it is not your type of music I am sure).
#41
(06-24-2017, 11:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: It was originally written for solo violin. We have most commonly heard it in its usual transcription for organ. Apparently it was too difficult for many violinists to play, and Bach transcribed it for organ so that others could play it. It has also been transcribed for symphony or4chestra, most famously by Stokowski for the introduction to Disney's original Fantasia. I thought it completely unsuited to piano until I heard Idil Biret play it convincingly. Lest we forget -- it's a favorite for synthesizers. I don;t know about marching bands, brass ensembles or drum-and-fife corps, or wind ensembles. Glass harmonica, anyone?

I believe the theory is that it was originally written in A minor for violin, and transcribed to D minor, possibly by someone other than Bach, for organ.  That would explain the lack of counterpoint, which lack is uncharacteristic of Bach organ works.  When transcribed to A minor, it's actually very well suited to violin, with lots of use of open strings and easy double stops; it's not a trivial piece, but not particularly difficult either.  Here's a performance of an A minor violin reconstruction:





My question is, why change it to D minor when transcribing for organ?  It seems to me more likely that it was originally written in D minor for viola - which would be played exactly like an A minor version on violin - and transcribed for organ without changing the key.
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#42
(06-24-2017, 11:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Solo harp? Wow!

Ivanova was amazing; it's a pity she quit performing.  Here she is at age 6:





Also, audio only of a Chopin piece that must have been even more technically challenging for harp than the Bach:



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#43
The rumor is that Bach wrote it for violin and found it so difficult to play that he had to transcribe it for organ to make it suitable for publication.

I am unaware of any violinist  -- Perlman, Stern, Suk, Oistrakh, Heifetz, Francescatti, or Kreisler ever playing it as an encore. I have never known of a commercial recording of the work. The original violin work may be lost, but the organ version is effectively the original.

Here's a violin arrangement, probably adapted from the organ score that really is known to exist:





I question whether it is playable on the violin.

...and an arrangement for solo cello:





So far as I know, neither Casals, Piatigorsky, Starker, Rostropovich, Schiff, Maisky, du Pre, nor Ma has ever recorded this arrangement.

To the extent that it is playable it would be a wonderful encore. I like the cello version more, by the way.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


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#44
(06-24-2017, 07:24 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: I question whether it is playable on the violin.

I've just posted a video of someone playing it on violin; you posted someone playing a slightly simplified version on violin; I think it's pretty clear that it's playable on the violin.

Quote:So far as I know, neither Casals, Piatigorsky, Starker, Rostropovich, Schiff, Maisky, du Pre, nor Ma has ever recorded this arrangement.

To the extent that it is playable it would be a wonderful encore. I like the cello version more, by the way.

The violin origin theory was only published in 1981.  It took a while for someone to try it out.  By that time, all the artists you and I recognize had gone into retirement or semiretirement.

The cello version is better than the violin version because the cello version stays in D rather than having to be transposed to A, as is required for the violin version.  A viola version would also stay in D as I discussed.
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#45
(06-24-2017, 11:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: It was originally written for solo violin. We have most commonly heard it in its usual transcription for organ. Apparently it was too difficult for many violinists to play, and Bach transcribed it for organ so that others could play it. It has also been transcribed for symphony or4chestra, most famously by Stokowski for the introduction to Disney's original Fantasia. I thought it completely unsuited to piano until I heard Idil Biret play it convincingly. Lest we forget -- it's a favorite for synthesizers. I don;t know about marching bands, brass ensembles or drum-and-fife corps, or wind ensembles. Glass harmonica, anyone?

Solo harp? Wow!

Like many a young Gen Xer, I used to record music from FM radio onto cassette tape.  One recording I particularly liked was a version of Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by a brass ensemble whose name I didn't catch.  I don't believe the following is the same recording, but it's the closest I could find to on youtube to my memory.







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#46
A four-movement work depicting a Civic/Heroic lifestyle? It would begin with a depiction of a hardscrabble childhood (think of how rough the GI's had things in contrast to later generations, a descent into an ominous Crisis that culminates in triumph or exhaustion, and then trying to piece back life again or live it well for the first time after the Crisis.... and as the High leads to a frenzied optimism, along comes chaos -- and finally a senescent whimper. The Gilded had some great composers, and the European contemporaries of American Gilded (I'm thinking most obviously of Bruckner, Saint-Saens, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Dvorak) who seem to have been similar to a Civic/Hero pattern. Any takers?

(Our Gilded began as Reactive/Nomad types and ended up with the Civic/Hero role after the Civil War, at least in the North).
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


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#47
Toccata and Fugue in D Minor was written in around 1708-09 when Bach was principally an organist writing music for organ. It is influenced by the organ composers he knew, and its theme comes from a phrase in the Pachelbel Fantasy in D Minor for organ. His violin and cello works and concertos were written in his Cothen period around 1717-1723.

Many Bach works are transcribed for other instruments; a practice begun by Bach himself. The Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is frequently transcribed. On a violin or cello, some notes are left out.

Another work frequently transcribed is the well-known Prelude for solo violin Partita #3, which Bach himself made into an opening Sinfonia for his Cantata #29, Sir Henry Wood transcribed for orchestra, and Walter Carlos transcribed as the first track of Switched-on Bach in 1968. Others have transcribed it for organ.

The original Switched-On Bach seems not to be available on you tube, but here is a later synthesizer version of the Prelude:
https://youtu.be/JilcLrS_p-w

Organ version:
https://youtu.be/1Csynke0maE
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#48
I dare everyone to compare this with the interpretation of the same piece from your favorite pianist.



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#49
Excellent Chopin favorite I had forgotten the name of.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#50
(06-30-2017, 08:43 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: I dare everyone to compare this with the interpretation of the same piece from your favorite pianist.




The Fantaisie-Impromptu Op 66 is a masterpiece allowing great range of emotional expressio0n of the pianist. That is how Chopin composes, and why his music is usually so poorly suited to transcription to anything other than the piano. (OK, I have heard his piano concertos with an orchestra of period instruments, and it sounded greater than what one usually gets with the late-nineteenth-century orchestra that we usually have as a default, and he did write a fine sonata for cello and piano).  Any pianist of a certain level of skill will put a personality into this work as is impossible in many other masterworks for the piano. 
.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


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#51
(07-01-2017, 07:28 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(06-30-2017, 08:43 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: I dare everyone to compare this with the interpretation of the same piece from your favorite pianist.




The Fantaisie-Impromptu Op 66 is a masterpiece allowing great range of emotional expressio0n of the pianist. That is how Chopin composes, and why his music is usually so poorly suited to transcription to anything other than the piano.

You didn't like the harp version I posted earlier?
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#52
(07-01-2017, 11:19 AM)Warren Dew Wrote:
(07-01-2017, 07:28 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(06-30-2017, 08:43 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: I dare everyone to compare this with the interpretation of the same piece from your favorite pianist.




The Fantaisie-Impromptu Op 66 is a masterpiece allowing great range of emotional expression of the pianist. That is how Chopin composes, and why his music is usually so poorly suited to transcription to anything other than the piano.

You didn't like the harp version I posted earlier?

I loved it! But the harp is arguably the instrument most similar to the piano; indeed a piano is basically a harp in a box. The harpist is a master performer. Just look inside a piano, and you will recognize that a keyboard plucks the strings.

I would not expect this work to come off well on a harpsichord, pipe organ, or synthesizer. I can't imagine it being transcribed effectively for orchestra, band, wind ensemble, or any plucked or bowed string instrument. Just contrast Bach's Toccata and Fugue in d minor. One cannot play most works of Chopin by simply playing the notes and convince anyone, which rules out any ensemble performance.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


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#53
I agree with that. I had to think for a moment about the harpsichord, but you're right, it doesn't have the dynamic range required.
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#54
Glenn Gould plays and discusses Bach, opening with one of my favorite organ fugues (the "Trinity" or "St. Anne" in E Flat, its "God" portion, S.552), and a bit later Cantata 54, whose opening coincidentally reminds me of the majestic organ toccata in F S. 540, as well as reminiscent of the more-famous "Sheep May Safely Graze."





It reminds me that Glenn Gould was as articulate a speaker as he was a player.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#55
Toni Cornell - never saw her perform before. Chip off the old block in a good way (and hopefully only in a good way), 12 going on 21. Assuming she has and keeps her shit together, the cop a phrase from an Offspring song, you're gonna go far kid!

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/c...on-w495960
#ImpeachTrump
#ProsecuteTreason
#HUAC2.0
#RealNationalism
#NaziPunksFOff


Mark 13:22 - "For there shall rise false Christs and false prophets, and they shall give signs and wonders, to seduce, if possible, also the chosen."


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#56
(06-25-2017, 02:56 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: Toccata and Fugue in D Minor was written in around 1708-09 when Bach was principally an organist writing music for organ. It is influenced by the organ composers he knew, and its theme comes from a phrase in the Pachelbel Fantasy in D Minor for organ. His violin and cello works and concertos were written in his Cothen period around 1717-1723.

Many Bach works are transcribed for other instruments; a practice begun by Bach himself. The Toccata and Fugue in D Minor is frequently transcribed. On a violin or cello, some notes are left out.

Another work frequently transcribed is the well-known Prelude for solo violin Partita #3, which Bach himself made into an opening Sinfonia for his Cantata #29, Sir Henry Wood transcribed for orchestra, and Walter Carlos transcribed as the first track of Switched-on Bach in 1968. Others have transcribed it for organ.

The original Switched-On Bach seems not to be available on you tube, but here is a later synthesizer version of the Prelude:
https://youtu.be/JilcLrS_p-w

Organ version:
https://youtu.be/1Csynke0maE

Pachelbel Fantasy in D Minor that contains the theme of Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor S.565.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#57


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#58
A very nice recent (1964) piece is the Ave Maria by Franz Biebl.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Biebl

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKk_HaDMBDY
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