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I'm not much of a TV watcher and seldom visit the Entertainment and Media folders.  I considered just putting this over in the political discussion section.  I'm posting this not because I'm particularly in love with the series, but out of interest in generation theory.

Amazon is streaming a series, "Good Girls Revolt".  It's a fictionalized account of events in the Newsweek newsrooms back in the 1960s.  At the time, males were reporters and females were researchers, sexism was rampant and taken for granted.  The primary long term conflict centers on the girls going to court to press for equality.  There is an abundance of opportunities for the various reporters and researchers, though, to visit the issues of the awakening.  I suspect most episodes will involve the cast investigating a story that explores one aspect or another of the awakening.

These forums feature a lot of Boomer Bashing.  I'll occasionally grumble about Xers and Millenials that dislike Boomer idealism and intensity.  My thesis is that they just don't understand the society the Boomers grew up in, the time when America was supposedly great, and the sexist and racist attitudes many find disturbing in Trump were openly and systematically practiced.  A lot of Blue Boomers were ticked by aspects of the 50s and 60s culture for good and appropriate reasons.  I can mention coat hanger abortions, live draft cards, black and white rest rooms and major cities totally lacking or having totally inadequate sewer treatment facilities.  Still, if you didn't live it, reading about it as abstract history doesn't give a true understanding of where the Blue Boomers came from and why they became what they became.  One has to have an imagination and spend some effort walking in someone else's shoes to get it.  Altogether too many members of the younger generations aren't bothering to go through any such effort.

I've just started into the series, but it seems to me that "Good Girls Revolt" removes the need to imagine at least.  It's a pretty good time warp.  I suspect any Boomer haters will also find a reason to hate the series.  Anything that forces one to stretch one's world view will be perceived of as being unpleasant, wrong, or otherwise not worth viewing.  Still, if you want a glimpse of the old 'deplorable' values operating unquestioned, blatantly, taken for granted, you might want to catch a few episodes.
(10-31-2016, 02:57 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote: [ -> ]I'm not much of a TV watcher and seldom visit the Entertainment and Media folders.  I considered just putting this over in the political discussion section.  I'm posting this not because I'm particularly in love with the series, but out of interest in generation theory.

Amazon is streaming a series, "Good Girls Revolt".  It's a fictionalized account of events in the Newsweek newsrooms back in the 1960s.  At the time, males were reporters and females were researchers, sexism was rampant and taken for granted.  The primary long term conflict centers on the girls going to court to press for equality.  There is an abundance of opportunities for the various reporters and researchers, though, to visit the issues of the awakening.  I suspect most episodes will involve the cast investigating a story that explores one aspect or another of the awakening.

These forums feature a lot of Boomer Bashing.  I'll occasionally grumble about Xers and Millenials that dislike Boomer idealism and intensity.  My thesis is that they just don't understand the society the Boomers grew up in, the time when America was supposedly great, and the sexist and racists attitudes many find disturbing in Trump were openly and systematically practiced.  A lot of Blue Boomers were ticked by aspects of the 50s and 60s culture for good and appropriate reasons.  I can mention coat hanger abortions, live draft cards, black and white rest rooms and major cities totally lacking or having totally inadequate sewer treatment facilities.  Still, if you didn't live it, reading about it as abstract history doesn't give a true understanding of where the Blue Boomers came from and why they became what they became.  One has to have an imagination and spend some effort walking in someone else's shoes to get it.  Altogether too many members of the younger generations aren't bothering to go through any such effort.

I've just started into the series, but it seems to me that "Good Girls Revolt" removes the need to imagine at least.  It's a pretty good time warp.  I suspect any Boomer haters will also find a reason to hate the series.  Anything that forces one to stretch one's world view will be perceived of as being unpleasant, wrong, or otherwise not worth viewing.  Still, if you want a glimpse of the old 'deplorable' values operating unquestioned, blatantly, taken for granted, you might want to catch a few episodes.

Well I am one person of a younger generation and I have said this many times but I dislike boomer bashing. That I want to listen to understand everyone's POV and from just reading up on what those boomers grew up with should be enough for people to understand but perhaps they need to be a sensitive like me to get it. I have heard of these coat hanger abortions. I believe Cher was in a movie which referred to a very dangerous abortion....let me think...."If these walls could talk." I recommend that movie for people to understand that topic in particular as experienced through the decades. But anyway please be aware some of us younger folk are listening.
Scratch a Boomer-Basher and you will fight a bitter aging conservative Xer or a Millennial who takes the new cultural norms the Boomers created for granted and/or wrongly conflates all Boomers with the BS of the Bush Jr. Era.

I have certainly never met a left-wing Xer who hates Boomers.
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I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

This is utter nonsense. Tara is right here, it is the Boomers who FOUGHT for people's right to be who they are. Nobody is "pushing" medications on young kids, that's plain anti-psychiatry BS from the usual crackpots who think ADHD and Depression is "made up".
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

To be perfectly honest he seems like the classic "rebel without a clue" who never emotionally grew up. Like I said in the other thread, he wants to be the martyr against "evil" society.
(10-31-2016, 03:09 PM)Odin Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

To be perfectly honest he seems like the classic "rebel without a clue" who never emotionally grew up. Like I said in the other thread, he wants to be the martyr against "evil" society.

I am still undecided on this person and am trying to figure this person out as to where he or she is getting these impressions as they are factually wrong and historically incorrect. But he or she certainly reminds me of another poster. I wonder if decadeologist has returned.
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

They did but they also created a generation who wants to bring back a time where different people are treated like second class citizens. The only difference is the types of differences they hate now. They fought for freedom and being themselves in the 60s and the 70s but they changed. I remember every other kid was prescribed ADHD meds if they were a bit hyper. The behavior standards for Millennials were so much higher than that for Boomers and they created a system where one mistake could ruin your life because of zero tolerance rules. The school system aimed to medicate every difference. Now there's a trend against that starting and I'm very glad it is.
(10-31-2016, 04:23 PM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

They did but they also created a generation who wants to bring back a time where different people are treated like second class citizens. The only difference is the types of differences they hate now. They fought for freedom and being themselves in the 60s and the 70s but they changed. I remember every other kid was prescribed ADHD meds if they were a bit hyper. The behavior standards for Millennials were so much higher than that for Boomers and they created a system where one mistake could ruin your life because of zero tolerance rules. The school system aimed to medicate every difference. Now there's a trend against that starting and I'm very glad it is.

If you are talking about red boomers yes but they carried on the old traditions and did not bring it back. They just continued with it. If you are purely talking about schools i have heard of these zero tolerance rules in America. They sound very different to how it is handled here.
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

Boomers fought for minority groups, emphasis on the groups.  That's very different from fighting for individualism.  When Boomers were kids, any kid who didn't wear the standard Boomer "protest" uniform of worn jeans and a tie dyed T shirt was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens, you got that right.  It was the squares who were given that treatment, though, not the protesters.

It's still the case that any "Blue Boomer" will attack black conservatives like Thomas Sowell with a passion, because they consider him to be a traitor to the cause just because he doesn't conform to their idea of what a black person should be like.
I would prefer to hear the blue boomers take on the post above mine. Especially to hear what they are supposed to think a black person is like. I do not get the impression that they assume blacks or gays etc are supposed to be a certain way. Rather they are fighting for equal rights. But I would love to hear what everyone thinks of that.
(10-31-2016, 06:33 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

Boomers fought for minority groups, emphasis on the groups.  That's very different from fighting for individualism.  When Boomers were kids, any kid who didn't wear the standard Boomer "protest" uniform of worn jeans and a tie dyed T shirt was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens, you got that right.  It was the squares who were given that treatment, though, not the protesters.

I don't quite agree, at least for the core boomers. The hippie and protest styles came in when we were teenagers, and for some of us were very liberating. But I know boomers in youth could be haughty, and put those down who weren't in the in group-- although that may be true for other generations too. Millennials seem like accepting and collegial folks like they're supposed to be, but there's still bullying, and some millennials are sometimes temperamental and mean. Well, it always takes all kinds to make a whole generation. You have to take generalizing about generations with a grain or two of salt.

But for me, that difficult phase ended with the 2T began in the mid-sixties. After that, boomers were open and accepting and very friendly. It was peace and love time. The barriers dropped, and freedom reigned. That ended promptly with the 3T in 1984, when boomers went back to being haughty and arrogant. Although, on the other hand, in the 2T there was as much pressure to be hip and break through social barriers, as there was to conform in the 1T.

Quote:It's still the case that any "Blue Boomer" will attack black conservatives like Thomas Sowell with a passion, because they consider him to be a traitor to the cause just because he doesn't conform to their idea of what a black person should be like.

A black conservative is probably a traitor to the cause, because conservative policies today are often dog-whistles for racism, and are almost entirely about resentment against paying taxes to help poor people. Black conservatives may be resented by some liberals, along with white ones, because those policies are what's wrong with our country today, and this ideology affects everyone and everything negatively.
(10-31-2016, 04:23 PM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

They did but they also created a generation who wants to bring back a time where different people are treated like second class citizens. The only difference is the types of differences they hate now. They fought for freedom and being themselves in the 60s and the 70s but they changed. I remember every other kid was prescribed ADHD meds if they were a bit hyper. The behavior standards for Millennials were so much higher than that for Boomers and they created a system where one mistake could ruin your life because of zero tolerance rules. The school system aimed to medicate every difference. Now there's a trend against that starting and I'm very glad it is.

Mr. Disaster Zone does not seem like he hates boomers for what they were as kids, as Warren is alluding to, or their youthful activism against the rigid and segregated world they grew up in, as Bob described. He is concerned about how boomers brought up their children. Like was mentioned on the other thread, there was an exaggerated fear of crime (which the Boomer candidate Trump wants to continue), which made for over-reactions such as disasterzone mentions. I also hope it's lessening, but it is part of the cycle described by Strauss and Howe.
(10-31-2016, 10:27 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 04:23 PM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

They did but they also created a generation who wants to bring back a time where different people are treated like second class citizens. The only difference is the types of differences they hate now. They fought for freedom and being themselves in the 60s and the 70s but they changed. I remember every other kid was prescribed ADHD meds if they were a bit hyper. The behavior standards for Millennials were so much higher than that for Boomers and they created a system where one mistake could ruin your life because of zero tolerance rules. The school system aimed to medicate every difference. Now there's a trend against that starting and I'm very glad it is.

Mr. Disaster Zone does not seem like he hates boomers for what they were as kids, as Warren is alluding to, or their youthful activism against the rigid and segregated world they grew up in, as Bob described. He is concerned about how boomers brought up their children.  Like was mentioned on the other thread, there was an exaggerated fear of crime (which the Boomer candidate Trump wants to continue), which made for over-reactions such as disasterzone mentions. I also hope it's lessening, but it is part of the cycle described by Strauss and Howe.
He or she should be more worried about xers and older millies for they will more so than not smother kids.
(10-31-2016, 10:13 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 06:33 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

Boomers fought for minority groups, emphasis on the groups.  That's very different from fighting for individualism.  When Boomers were kids, any kid who didn't wear the standard Boomer "protest" uniform of worn jeans and a tie dyed T shirt was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens, you got that right.  It was the squares who were given that treatment, though, not the protesters.

I don't quite agree, at least for the core boomers. The hippie and protest styles came in when we were teenagers, and for some of us were very liberating. But I know boomers in youth could be haughty, and put those down who weren't in the in group-- although that may be true for other generations too. Millennials seem like accepting and collegial folks like they're supposed to be, but there's still bullying, and some millennials are sometimes temperamental and mean. Well, it always takes all kinds to make a whole generation. You have to take generalizing about generations with a grain or two of salt.

But for me, that difficult phase ended with the 2T began in the mid-sixties. After that, boomers were open and accepting and very friendly. It was peace and love time. The barriers dropped, and freedom reigned. That ended promptly with the 3T in 1984, when boomers went back to being haughty and arrogant. Although, on the other hand, in the 2T there was as much pressure to be hip and break through social barriers, as there was to conform in the 1T.

Quote:It's still the case that any "Blue Boomer" will attack black conservatives like Thomas Sowell with a passion, because they consider him to be a traitor to the cause just because he doesn't conform to their idea of what a black person should be like.

A black conservative is probably a traitor to the cause, because conservative policies today are often dog-whistles for racism, and are almost entirely about resentment against paying taxes to help poor people. Black conservatives may be resented by some liberals, along with white ones, because those policies are what's wrong with our country today, and this ideology affects everyone and everything negatively.

That is exactly what I thought. It is like a woman voting republican. Smashing themselves in the face essentially.
(10-31-2016, 06:33 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 02:14 PM)taramarie Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-31-2016, 11:57 AM)disasterzone Wrote: [ -> ]I actually like intensity and idealism. I'm just angry that boomers did everything to stamp out individuality in their young and created a bunch of people intent on eliminating it, allowing no exceptions to the rules. I mean why else would they be so intent on forcing medications on kids or pushing children into large groups, trying to make them perfectly behave?  Now I'm stuck in this generation and there's nothing I can do about it but survive it until it's over.

No they did not. They FOUGHT for those folk who were considered different. Fought for their rights and for them to be heard. They FOUGHT for individualism in the name of freedom because when they were kids anyone who was different was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens. I honestly do not know where you are getting this impression.

Boomers fought for minority groups, emphasis on the groups.  That's very different from fighting for individualism.  When Boomers were kids, any kid who didn't wear the standard Boomer "protest" uniform of worn jeans and a tie dyed T shirt was shoved aside and treated like 2nd class citizens, you got that right.  It was the squares who were given that treatment, though, not the protesters.

It's still the case that any "Blue Boomer" will attack black conservatives like Thomas Sowell with a passion, because they consider him to be a traitor to the cause just because he doesn't conform to their idea of what a black person should be like.

Sowell is attacked because he is a right-wing nut who uses his race as a shield to defend himself from criticism.
We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.
I mean I do not know if other generations call the American millies culturally dead. They certainly do here in NZ towards us millies. Rule desiring, culturally numb, dead and drawn to create things together and with it loosing individual creativity is the fear of older folk from my experience as a creative millennial being in a class of other fellow creative millennials.
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