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The Geography of U.S. Inequality
#1
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/...p=cur&_r=0


Quote:A chart has been making the rounds among the wonky corners of the internet. Nicknamed the elephant chart because of its peculiar shape, it has a big hump showing rising incomes for the world’s middle class, leading into a deep trough for the world’s upper middle class, then rising into another peak for the world’s wealthiest. To make the shape more obvious, some people on the internet have even drawn feet and ears on the graph.

But it isn’t meant to provoke laughs. Made by Branko Milanovic, an economics professor at the City University of New York, the chart forcefully shows how incomes for the middle class have risen in emerging economies like China and fallen for the lower middle class in advanced economies like the United States...



http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/...p=cur&_r=0
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#2
Housing costs compared to wages. It looks like generally-blue states cost the most to live in. But the effects are felt in the other places, since it reduces mobility, and reduces the chances of finding decent housing in a blue state.

http://www.citylab.com/housing/2015/05/m...te/394142/

[Image: 1fe005e3c.png]
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#3
(04-19-2017, 02:43 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote:
(04-18-2017, 11:25 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: Housing costs compared to wages. It looks like generally-blue states cost the most to live in. But the effects are felt in the other places, since it reduces mobility, and reduces the chances of finding decent housing in a blue state.

http://www.citylab.com/housing/2015/05/m...te/394142/

[Image: 1fe005e3c.png]

Nothing to be proud of, nonetheless ... we're #3 ... we're #3 .... (rolls then shakes pom poms) ....

Tongue

I find it to be barbaric how much it costs just to have a place to live. In many cases people need to spend half their entire income on a rent or mortgage payment. And lest not forget that when this is the case, this is money that can't be spent in discretionary if not luxury sectors of the economy such as restaurants and department stores. There should be a gigantic spotlight on this issue, but I guess it isn't sexy or appealing enough for the MSM to cover it more than the bare minimum.
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#4
Interesting that the top 3 most expensive are also the top 3 states that voted for Hillary (HI, DC, CA). In general, the more expensive, the more Democratic.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#5
http://www.msnbc.com/interactives/geogra...index.html






The new national anthem, man. Cool   Screw globalism, NAFTA, NATO, MIC, etc., etc.
---Value Added Cool
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#6
But note well that some of the state rates reflect that the average cost applies as much to a state as a whole. Consider Virginia, which has pricey suburbs near Dee Cee... and some dying towns in mining country. The $16.62 average in Texas includes high-cost Austin, Dallas, and Houston -- and some dwindlng hick towns where rents might be incredibly cheap.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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