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Four Stars Equals Zero in Gig Economy
#1
The title says it all. Most if not all of the gig economy platforms, Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, etc. use a five-star rating system, which in itself is fine. But the way they administer it is very flawed to say the least. In their minds anything below five stars might just as well be zero. I would think that a lot of people would by nature be reluctant to give five stars unless the provider went way over and beyond the call of the duty, such as rescuing the family dog from ongoing traffic.  If the rating system were administered the way it should be, anything 3.5 (70 percent) or higher would be passing unless a real serious offense was committed. Uber boots drivers from their platform if their rating falls below 4.6, which is still 92 percent, very commendable on any school test. I am wondering if any of you here have any ideas as to where this four stars equals zero mentality comes from. Might also be interesting to have a discussion on how these companies can say that there people are not employees if they indeed have the power to boot them from the platform. A lawsuit waiting to happen? And also as to if this type of arrangement represents the wave of the future.
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#2
The issue is that most people don't use the two, three, and four star ratings; they either give 5 stars as the default, or they give 1 star if something bad happened. Thus a 92%/4.6 rating means that 8% of the time, the drive doesn't show up, or fails to get to the right place, or assaults the passenger, or something like that. When you think of it that way, 4.6 doesn't seem as high.

Amazon gives a percentage rating, which is the percentage of 4 and 5 star ratings out of all ratings. I think twice before using a vendor with less than a 98% rating - too much of a chance that there will be a problem that I'll have to spend hours to straighten out.

If people actually gave a 3 star average rating instead of defaulting to 5 stars, things would be different, but that's not what people actually do.
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#3
(11-30-2019, 07:29 PM)Warren Dew Wrote: The issue is that most people don't use the two, three, and four star ratings; they either give 5 stars as the default, or they give 1 star if something bad happened.  Thus a 92%/4.6 rating means that 8% of the time, the drive doesn't show up, or fails to get to the right place, or assaults the passenger, or something like that.  When you think of it that way, 4.6 doesn't seem as high.

Amazon gives a percentage rating, which is the percentage of 4 and 5 star ratings out of all ratings.  I think twice before using a vendor with less than a 98% rating - too much of a chance that there will be a problem that I'll have to spend hours to straighten out.

If people actually gave a 3 star average rating instead of defaulting to 5 stars, things would be different, but that's not what people actually do.

I'm looking to see what drives the overall rating down a bit. 4 stars is pretty common there. If there are no 1 star ratings, it's probably a decent product. But if there are some one stars, it shows there might be serious problems.

Reviews don't commonly indicate how long the product of service performs before it breaks. Vendors often ask for reviews right away. Sometimes I ask this question, and get a few comments from people who have owned the product a few years.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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