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Obituaries
Tim Conway, age 85.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Conway
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...and as the Silent go, so does their greatest cultural contribution to American life, the self-effacing humor that kept many of us from getting too full of ourselves.


Thomas Daniel "Tim" Conway (December 15, 1933 – May 14, 2019)[1] was an American comedic actor, writer and director. He portrayed the inept Ensign Parker in the 1960s World War II situation comedy McHale's Navy, was a regular cast member on the 1970s variety and sketch comedy program The Carol Burnett Show, co-starred with Don Knotts in several films in the late 1970s and early 1980s, starred as the title character in the Dorf series of comedy films, and provided the voice of Barnacle Boy in the animated series SpongeBob SquarePants.

The Steve Allen Show

Comedic actress Rose Marie visited WJW in 1961, as part of CBS's promotional practice of sending their major show stars directly to local affiliates: in this case, it was for The Dick Van Dyke Show. She viewed tapes of some of Anderson and Conway's skits and proceeded to take Conway under her wing. Following his departure from WJW, Conway moved to New York City; where, with Rose Marie's assistance, he auditioned for, and gained a spot on, ABC's The Steve Allen Show as a regular player.[9] Conway (who by this point had officially changed his first name to Tim) continued on the show through its entire run.


Conway gained a national following from his role as the bumbling, naive Ensign Charles Parker, Executive Officer of the World War II PT-73, in the 1960s sitcom McHale's Navy, alongside Ernest Borgnine and Joe Flynn. Borgnine became a mentor and a good friend. Conway appeared at Borgnine's 90th birthday celebration and, four years later, paid tribute to his friend at 7th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards on TNT.[10] Conway said, "Borgnine was 'like a big teddy bear' and 'a very pleasant person to be around' when he worked with him on the World War Two sitcom 'McHale's Navy'."[11]

Afterwards, he starred in a string of short-lived TV series, starting with 1967's Rango which starred Conway as an incompetent Texas Ranger.

The Carol Burnett Show

Starting with the 1975–76 season, Conway became a regular on The Carol Burnett Show, after having been a frequent guest for the show's first eight seasons.[9] Conway's work on the show earned him four Emmy Awards: one for writing and three for performance, one of which was before he became a regular. Two of Conway's memorable characters on the Burnett Show were:
  • The Oldest Man, whose shaggy white hair, slow speech, and shuffling gait ran counter to the much-needed energy levels of the various occupations in which he was usually found. His comic inability to get said jobs done — usually with slapstick results to himself and, with many an ad-lib — both frustrated and 'broke up' his fellow sketch performers.
  • Mr. Tudball, a businessman whose intentions of running a 'ship-shape' office were usually sunk by the bored indifference of his secretary, Mrs. Wiggins (Burnett). Although the character was widely thought to be Swedish, Conway used a Romanian accent learned from his mother.[15] For example, his attempts to pronounce his secretary's name came out as "Mrs. Ah-huh-wiggins". He also used this accent for other characters, such as an inept dentist.
Conway could also get results with no dialogue, such as in a sketch in which he played a tired businessman seeking restful sleep in his hotel — and pestered by a housefly, created only by a sound effect and Conway's gazing after it. After much struggle, he manages to get the fly out of the room through the window; after returning to bed, he hears a persistent knock on his door, gets up to answer it, and opens the door, letting the fly (who was doing the knocking) back in.

Another skit, also without a word from Conway, featured him playing Simba, a lion raised by humans then released to the wild (based on the lioness Elsa in the film Born Free). Conway, told of the upcoming eviction from the comfortable home, caused Burnett and Harvey Korman to break up with an interminable process of packing to leave.

A prime example of his ability to make his co-stars laugh uncontrollably involved Lyle Waggoner as a captured American airman, with Conway as a stereotypical blond-haired Gestapo agent charged with his interrogation. Stating that "the Fuhrer" had taken particular interest, Conway produces a small Hitler hand puppet. Conway suggests to the puppet that singing might relax Waggoner's character to the point he is willing to talk. In a long, drawn-out fashion, the Hitler puppet (Conway providing a falsetto voice, with German accent) sings "I've Been Working on the Railroad", and with each passing verse, Waggoner loses more of his composure, finally laughing hysterically when puppet-Hitler screeches, "FEE-FI-Fiddely-I-O!"A well-known outtake from the Carol Burnett Show is from the recurring "The Family" sketch, with Conway (as Mickey Hart) telling a mostly ad-libbed story about a circus elephant. As the story continues, the other cast members become increasingly unable to stay in character, leading up to Vicki Lawrence (in-character as Mama) finally asking, "You sure that little asshole's through?", resulting in all the cast members, including Conway, finally breaking up in gales of laughter.
Conway remained a regular cast member of The Carol Burnett Show until the program's run ended, in 1978.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Conway
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Female lead in Kurosawa's film Rashomon:

Machiko Kyō (Japanese: 京 マチ子 Hepburn: Kyō Machiko, March 25, 1924 – May 12, 2019) was a Japanese actress who was active primarily in the 1950s.


Kyō, an only child, was born Yano Motoko in Osaka in 1924. Her father left when she was 5 and she was raised by her mother and grandmother. She adopted Machiko Kyō as her stage name when she entered the Osaka Shochiku Kagekidan in 1936 at age 12. She trained as a revue dancer before entering the film industry through Daiei in 1949. Two years later, she achieved international fame as the female lead in Akira Kurosawa's film Rashomon, which won first prize at the Venice Film Festival and stunned audiences with its nonlinear narrative.[1] She starred in many more Japanese productions, including Kenji Mizoguchi's Ugetsu (1953), Teinosuke Kinugasa's Gate of Hell (1953), Kon Ichikawa's Odd Obsession (1959), and Yasujirō Ozu's Floating Weeds (1959).

Her sole role in a non-Japanese film was as the young geisha Lotus Blossom in The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956) opposite Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford, for which she received a Golden Globe nomination.

Kyō continued to act through her 80's. Her final role was as "Matsuura Shino" in the NHK television drama series Haregi Koko Ichiban in 2000. In 2017 she was presented with an award of merit at the 40th Japanese Academy Awards.[1] After retiring from film, she moved back to Osaka, where she resided until her death.

Kyō never married, although her romantic relationship with Daiei's president Masaichi Nagata was well-publicized in her native country.
Kyō died from heart failure on May 12, 2019. She was 95.[2][3]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machiko_Ky%C5%8D
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Architect I. M. Pei

Ieoh Ming Pei, FAIA, RIBA[1] (26 April 1917 – 16 May 2019) was a Chinese-American architect. Born in Guangzhou and raised in Hong Kong and Shanghai, Pei drew inspiration at an early age from the gardens at Suzhou. In 1935, he moved to the United States and enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania's architecture school, but quickly transferred to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was unhappy with the focus at both schools on Beaux-Arts architecture, and spent his free time researching emerging architects, especially Le Corbusier. After graduating, he joined the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) and became a friend of the Bauhaus architects Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer. In 1948, Pei was recruited by New York City real estate magnate William Zeckendorf, for whom he worked for seven years before establishing his own independent design firm I. M. Pei & Associates in 1955, which became I. M. Pei & Partners in 1966 and later in 1989 became Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. Pei retired from full-time practice in 1990. In his retirement, he worked as an architectural consultant primarily from his sons' architectural firm Pei Partnership Architects.

Pei's first major recognition came with the Mesa Laboratory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado (designed in 1961, and completed in 1967). His new stature led to his selection as chief architect for the John F. Kennedy Library in Massachusetts. He went on to design Dallas City Hall and the East Building of the National Gallery of Art.[2] He returned to China for the first time in 1975 to design a hotel at Fragrant Hills, and designed Bank of China Tower, Hong Kong, a skyscraper in Hong Kong for the Bank of China fifteen years later. In the early 1980s, Pei was the focus of controversy when he designed a glass-and-steel pyramid for the Musée du Louvre in Paris. He later returned to the world of the arts by designing the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas, the Miho Museum in Japan, Shigaraki, near Kyoto, and the chapel of the school: MIHO Institute of Aesthetics, the Suzhou Museum in Suzhou,[3] Museum of Islamic Art in Qatar, and the Grand Duke Jean Museum of Modern Art, abbreviated to Mudam, in Luxembourg.

Pei won a wide variety of prizes and awards in the field of architecture, including the AIA Gold Medal in 1979, the first Praemium Imperiale for Architecture in 1989, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in 2003. In 1983, he won the Pritzker Prize, which is sometimes referred to as the Nobel Prize of architecture.

Much more at Wikipedia
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Novelist Herman Wouk.


Herman Wouk (/woʊk/; May 27, 1915 - May 17, 2019) was an American author. His 1951 novel The Caine Mutiny won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His other works include The Winds of War and War and Remembrance, historical novels about World War II, and non-fiction such as This Is My God, a popular explanation of Judaism from a Modern Orthodox perspective, written for Jewish and non-Jewish audiences. His books have been translated into 27 languages.[1] The Washington Post called Wouk, who cherishes his privacy, "the reclusive dean of American historical novelists."[1] Historians, novelists, publishers, and critics who gathered at the Library of Congress in 1995 to mark Wouk's 80th birthday described him as an American Tolstoy.[2]

 

Wouk joined the U.S Navy following the attack on Pearl Harbor and served in the Pacific Theater during World War II, an experience he later characterized as educational: "I learned about machinery, I learned how men behaved under pressure, and I learned about Americans." Wouk served as an officer aboard two destroyer minesweepers (DMS), the USS Zane and USS Southard, becoming executive officer of the latter. He participated in eight invasions and won a number of battle stars.[9] During off-duty hours aboard ship he started writing a novel, Aurora Dawn, which he originally titled Aurora Dawn; or, The True history of Andrew Reale, containing a faithful account of the Great Riot, together with the complete texts of Michael Wilde's oration and Father Stanfield's sermon. Wouk sent a copy of the opening chapters to philosophy professor Irwin Edman, under whom he studied at Columbia,[11] who quoted a few pages verbatim to a New York editor. The result was a publisher's contract sent to Wouk's ship, then off the coast of Okinawa. The novel was published in 1947 and became a Book of the Month Club main selection. His second novel, City Boy, proved to be a commercial disappointment at the time of its initial publication in 1948; Wouk once claimed it was largely ignored amid the excitement over Norman Mailer's bestselling World War II novel The Naked and the Dead.[12]

While writing his next novel, Wouk read each chapter to his wife as it was completed. At one point she remarked that if they did not like this one, he had better take up another line of work (a line he would give to the character of the editor Jeannie Fry in his 1962 novel Youngblood Hawke). The novel, The Caine Mutiny (1951), went on to win the Pulitzer Prize. A best-seller, drawing from his wartime experiences aboard minesweepers during World War II, The Caine Mutiny was adapted by the author into a Broadway play called The Caine Mutiny Court Martial and, in 1954, Columbia Pictures released a film version with Humphrey Bogart portraying Lt. Commander Philip Francis Queeg, captain of the fictional USS Caine.[13]

 His first novel after The Caine Mutiny was Marjorie Morningstar (1955), which earned him a Time magazine cover story. Three years later Warner Brothers made it into a movie starring Natalie Wood, Gene Kelly and Claire Trevor. His next novel, a paperback, was Slattery's Hurricane (1956), which he had written in 1948 as the basis for the screenplay for the film of the same name. Wouk's first work of non-fiction was 1959's This is My God: The Jewish Way of Life, a primer on the beliefs and practices of Orthodox Judaism.

In the 1960s he authored Youngblood Hawke (1962), a drama about the rise and fall of a young writer modeled on the life of Thomas Wolfe, and Don't Stop the Carnival (1965), a comedy about escaping mid-life crisis by moving to the Caribbean (loosely based on Wouk's own experience). Youngblood Hawke was serialized in McCall's magazine from March to July 1962. A movie version starred James Franciscus and Suzanne Pleshette, which was released by Warner Brothers in 1964. Don't Stop the Carnival was turned into a short-lived musical by Jimmy Buffett in 1997.
In the 1970s Wouk published two monumental novels, The Winds of War (1971) and its sequel, War and Remembrance (1978). He described the latter, which included a devastating depiction of the Holocaust, as "the main tale I have to tell." Both were made into popular TV miniseries, the first in 1983 and the second in 1988. Although they were made several years apart, both were directed by Dan Curtis and both starred Robert Mitchum as Captain Victor "Pug" Henry, the main character. The novels are historical fiction. Each has three layers: the story told from the viewpoints of Captain Henry and his circle of family and friends; a more or less straightforward historical account of the events of the war; and an analysis by a member of Hitler's military staff, the insightful fictional General Armin von Roon.[12] Wouk devoted "thirteen years of extraordinary research and long, arduous composition" to these two novels, noted Arnold Beichman. "The seriousness with which Wouk has dealt with the war can be seen in the prodigious amount of research, reading, travel and conferring with experts, the evidence of which may be found in the uncatalogued boxes at Columbia University" that contain the author's papers.[14]

Wouk would spend the next several decades of his literary career writing about Jews, Israel, Judaism, and, for the first time, science.

Inside, Outside (1985) is the story of four generations of a Russian Jewish family and its travails in Russia, the U.S. and Israel. The Hope (1993) and its sequel, The Glory (1994), are historical novels about the first 33 years of Israel's history. They were followed by The Will to Live On: This is Our Heritage (2000), a whirlwind tour of Jewish history and sacred texts and companion volume to This is My God.[15]

A Hole in Texas (2004) is a novel about the discovery of the Higgs boson (whose existence was proven nine years later), while The Language God Talks: On Science and Religion (2010) is an exploration into the tension between religion and science that originated in a discussion Wouk had with the theoretical physicist Richard Feynman. [16]
The Lawgiver (2012) is an epistolary novel about a contemporary Hollywood writer of a movie script about Moses – with the consulting help of a nonfictional character: Herman Wouk himself, a "mulish ancient" who gets involved despite the strong misgivings of his wife.[17]

Wouk's latest book, which he says will be his last,[18] is a memoir entitled Sailor and Fiddler: Reflections of a 100-Year-Old Author, and it was released in January 2016 to mark his 100th birthday.[19][20] NPR called it "a lovely coda to the career of a man who made American literature a kinder, smarter, better place."[18]

More at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Pei's Louvre pyramid "mirrored by another inverted pyramid underneath, to reflect sunlight into the room" became the final symbol of the Holy Grail in Dan Brown's best-selling book The DaVinci Code.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramide_Invers%C3%A9e

[Image: 220px-Louvre_museum%27s_inverted_pyramid...ped%29.jpg]

In The Da Vinci Code
The Inverted Pyramid figures prominently on the concluding pages of Dan Brown's international bestseller The Da Vinci Code. The protagonist of his novel, Robert Langdon, reads esoteric symbolism into the two pyramids: The Inverted Pyramid is perceived as a Chalice, a feminine symbol, whereas the stone pyramid below is interpreted as a Blade, a masculine symbol: the whole structure could thus express the union of the sexes. Moreover, Brown's protagonist concludes that the tiny stone pyramid is actually only the apex of a larger pyramid (possibly the same size as the inverted pyramid above), embedded in the floor as a secret chamber. This chamber is implied to enclose the body of Mary Magdalene.

At the climax of the film adaptation, the camera elaborately moves through the entire glass pyramid from above and then descends beneath the floor below to reveal the supposed hidden chamber under the tiny stone pyramid, containing the sarcophagus with the remains of Mary Magdalene.

Other esoteric interpretations
Brown was not the first writer to offer esoteric interpretations of the Inverted Pyramid. In Raphaël Aurillac's work Le guide du Paris maçonnique the author declares that the Louvre used to be a Masonic temple. To Aurillac, the various glass pyramids constructed in recent decades include Masonic symbolism. Aurillac sees the downward-pointing pyramid as expressing the Rosicrucian motto V.I.T.R.I.O.L. (Visita Interiora Terrae Rectificandoque / Invenies Occultum Lapidem, "Visit the interior of the earth and by rectifying you will find the secret stone"). Another writer on Masonic architecture, Dominique Setzepfandt, sees the two pyramids as suggesting "the compass and square that together form the Seal of Solomon" (quoted in Code Da Vinci: L'enquête by Marie-France Etchegoin and Frédéric Lenoir).
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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RlP Lena Horne. 92 yrs young & a great singer Sad
Heart  Bernie/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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(05-03-2019, 02:45 AM)Tim Randal Walker Wrote: Peter Mayhew, 74.  The actor who played Chewbacca in Star Wars.

-- 1st they killed off Harrison Ford. Then Carrie Fisher died 4 real. Now Chewie's gone. Yep Star Wars has jumped the shark
Heart  Bernie/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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(05-17-2019, 08:24 PM)Marypoza Wrote:
(05-03-2019, 02:45 AM)Tim Randal Walker Wrote: Peter Mayhew, 74.  The actor who played Chewbacca in Star Wars.

-- 1st they killed off Harrison Ford. Then Carrie Fisher died 4 real. Now Chewie's gone. Yep Star Wars has jumped the shark

Yeah, hard to fix it after that.
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A survivor of the Columbine High School shooting who later became a prominent advocate for fighting addiction has been found dead at his Colorado home.

Austin Eubanks, 37, was shot in the hand and knee in the 1999 Columbine attack, in which 12 of his classmates and a teacher were killed.

He became addicted to drugs after taking pain medication while recovering from his injuries.

Officials say there were no signs of foul play in his death.

Eubanks's body was discovered on Saturday at his home in Steamboats Springs, Colorado, Routt County Coroner Robert Ryg said.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-48330318

Gun violence killed someone twenty years after the shooting.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(05-18-2019, 07:40 PM)Hintergrund Wrote:
(05-17-2019, 08:24 PM)Marypoza Wrote:
(05-03-2019, 02:45 AM)Tim Randal Walker Wrote: Peter Mayhew, 74.  The actor who played Chewbacca in Star Wars.

-- 1st they killed off Harrison Ford. Then Carrie Fisher died 4 real. Now Chewie's gone. Yep Star Wars has jumped the shark

Yeah, hard to fix it after that.

Not with CGI.  The creative force always lies off-screen anyway, so the director can just add-in characters nominally played by dead actors.  Han Solo, on the other hand, will have to remain dead.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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(05-20-2019, 12:47 PM)David Horn Wrote:
(05-18-2019, 07:40 PM)Hintergrund Wrote:
(05-17-2019, 08:24 PM)Marypoza Wrote:
(05-03-2019, 02:45 AM)Tim Randal Walker Wrote: Peter Mayhew, 74.  The actor who played Chewbacca in Star Wars.

-- 1st they killed off Harrison Ford. Then Carrie Fisher died 4 real. Now Chewie's gone. Yep Star Wars has jumped the shark

Yeah, hard to fix it after that.

Not with CGI.  The creative force always lies off-screen anyway, so the director can just add-in characters nominally played by dead actors.  Han Solo, on the other hand, will have to remain dead.

Or different actors. Alec Guinness, Carrie Fisher, and Peter Mayhew are dead.  But think of Star Trek: Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, and James Doohan are deceased. It's hard to believe that William Shatner is approaching 90 -- but it is true.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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The former Formula One driver and three-time world champion Niki Lauda has died at the age of 70, his family has said. The Austrian died overnight on Monday, eight months after receiving a lung transplant.

“With deep sadness, we announce that our beloved Niki has peacefully passed away with his family on Monday,” the family said in a statement, according to the Austrian press agency. The statement paid tribute to “his unique achievements as an athlete and entrepreneur” and said “his tireless zest for action, his straightforwardness and his courage remain. A role model and a benchmark for all of us, he was a loving and caring husband, father and grandfather away from the public, and he will be missed.”
Niki Lauda: the three-time Formula One world champion's life – in pictures

Lauda, who won titles in 1975, 1977 and 1984, was hugely admired, respected and liked within F1 after a remarkable career during which he won two titles for Ferrari and one for McLaren and came back from an horrific accident that left him severely burned and injured in 1976. He competed in 171 races and won 25. He also actively pursued business interests including his own airline and went on to have senior roles in F1 management, most recently as non-executive chairman at the hugely successful Mercedes since 2012, where he helped bring Lewis Hamilton to the team.

As tributes began to flow, his former team McLaren said: “Niki will forever be in our hearts and enshrined in our history.” Jenson Button, the former world champion, said “a legend has left us” while prominent motorsports journalist Nick De Groot said Lauda’s status within the sport was “not just for what he achieved on the race track, but for what he overcame to get there”

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2019/m...es-aged-70
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Barbara Marx Hubbard (born Barbara Marx; December 22, 1929 – April 10, 2019) was a futurist, author and public speaker. She is credited with the concepts of "The Synergy Engine" and the "birthing" of humanity.

[Image: 220px-Barbara_Marx_Hubbard%2C_December_2011.jpg]

As an author, speaker, and co-founder and president of the Foundation for Conscious Evolution, Hubbard posited that humanity was on the threshold of a quantum leap if newly emergent scientific, social, and spiritual capacities were integrated to address global crises.

She was the author of seven books on social and planetary evolution. In conjunction with the Shift Network, Barbara co-produced the worldwide “Birth 2012” multimedia event.

She was the subject of a biography by author Neale Donald Walsch, The Mother of Invention: The Legacy of Barbara Marx Hubbard and the Future of "YOU". Deepak Chopra called her, "the voice for conscious evolution."

Her name was placed in nomination for the vice-presidency of the United States on the Democratic ticket in 1984, and at which convention she gave a speech upon being nominated. She was the first woman to be nominated for the Vice Presidency of the United States on the Democratic ticket. She also co-chaired a number of Soviet-American Citizen Summits, introducing a new concept called “SYNCON” to foster synergistic convergence with opposing groups. In addition, she co-founded the World Future Society, and the Association for Global New Thought.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Marx_Hubbard
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Serial murderer and rapist Bobbie Joe Long, a/k/a the "Classified-Ads killer" of the Tampa-St. Petersburg area. Execution by lethal execution.

Before anyone cheers, this fellow had a messed-up life beginning with a double-X chromosome and lots of injuries,including head injuries.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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The man who postulated the quark, even naming it (citing "two quarks for Muster mark") by James Joyce:


Murray Gell-Mann (/ˈmʌri ˈɡɛl ˈmæn/; September 15, 1929 – May 24, 2019)[5] was an American physicist who received the 1969 Nobel Prize in physics for his work on the theory of elementary particles. Until his death, he was the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology, a distinguished fellow and co-founder of the Santa Fe Institute, a professor of physics at the University of New Mexico, and the Presidential Professor of Physics and Medicine at the University of Southern California.[6]

Gell-Mann spent several periods at CERN, among others as a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellow in 1972.[7][8]

 
In 1958, Gell-Mann and Richard Feynman, in parallel with the independent team of George Sudarshan and Robert Marshak, discovered the chiral structures of the weak interaction in physics. This work followed the experimental discovery of the violation of parity by Chien-Shiung Wu, as suggested by Chen Ning Yang and Tsung-Dao Lee, theoretically.

Gell-Mann's work in the 1950s involved recently discovered cosmic ray particles that came to be called kaons and hyperons. Classifying these particles led him to propose that a quantum number called strangeness would be conserved by the strong and the electromagnetic interactions, but not by the weak interactions. Another of Gell-Mann's ideas is the Gell-Mann–Okubo formula, which was, initially, a formula based on empirical results, but was later explained by his quark model. Gell-Mann and Abraham Pais were involved in explaining several puzzling aspects of the physics of these particles.

In 1961, this led him (and Kazuhiko Nishijima) to introduce a classification scheme for hadrons, elementary particles that participate in the strong interaction. (This scheme had been independently proposed by Yuval Ne'eman.) This scheme is now explained by the quark model. Gell-Mann referred to the scheme as the Eightfold Way, because of the octets of particles in the classification. (The term is a reference to the eightfold way of Buddhism.)

In 1964, Gell-Mann and, independently, George Zweig went on to postulate the existence of quarks, particles of which the hadrons of this scheme are composed. The name was coined by Gell-Mann and is a reference to the novel Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce ("Three quarks for Muster Mark!" book 2, episode 4). Zweig had referred to the particles as "aces",[13] but Gell-Mann's name caught on. Quarks, antiquarks, and gluons were soon established as the underlying elementary objects in the study of the structure of hadrons. He was awarded a Nobel Prize in physics in 1969 for his contributions and discoveries concerning the classification of elementary particles and their interactions.[14]

In 1972 he and Harald Fritzsch introduced the conserved quantum number "color charge", and later, together with Heinrich Leutwyler, they coined the term quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as the gauge theory of the strong interaction. The quark model is a part of QCD, and it has been robust enough to accommodate in a natural fashion the discovery of new "flavors" of quarks, which superseded the eightfold way scheme.

At the time of his death, he was the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at California Institute of Technology as well as a University Professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department of the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and the Presidential Professor of Physics and Medicine at the University of Southern California. He was a member of the editorial board of the Encyclopædia Britannica. In 1984 Gell-Mann co-founded the Santa Fe Institute—a non-profit theoretical research institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico—to study complex systems and disseminate the notion of a separate interdisciplinary study of complexity theory.
He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in 1951, and a visiting research professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign from 1952 to 1953.[15] He was a visiting associate professor at Columbia University and an associate professor at the University of Chicago in 1954–55 before moving to the California Institute of Technology, where he taught from 1955 until he retired in 1993.
[Image: 220px-Murray_Gell-Mann_at_Lection_%28big%29.jpg]
Murray Gell-Mann in Nice, 2012

During the 1990s, Gell-Mann's interest turned to the emerging study of complexity. He played a central role in the founding of the Santa Fe Institute, where he continued to work as a distinguished professor.

He wrote a popular science book about these matters, The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (1994). The title of the book is taken from a line of a poem by Arthur Sze: "The world of the quark has everything to do with a jaguar circling in the night".[16]

The author George Johnson has written a biography of Gell-Mann, Strange Beauty: Murray Gell-Mann, and the Revolution in 20th-Century Physics (1999), which was shortlisted for the Royal Society Book Prize.[17] Gell-Mann criticized it as inaccurate. The Nobel Prize–winning physicist Philip Anderson, in his chapter on Gell-Mann from a 2011 book,[18] says that Johnson's biography is excellent. Both Anderson and Johnson say that Gell-Mann was a perfectionist and that his semibiography, The Quark and the Jaguar (1994) is consequently incomplete.

In 2012 he and his companion Mary McFadden published the book Mary McFadden: A Lifetime of Design, Collecting, and Adventure.[19]

 Gell-Mann introduced, independently of George Zweig, the quark—constituents of all hadrons—having first identified the SU(3) flavor symmetry of hadrons. This symmetry is now understood to underlie the light quarks, extending isospin to include strangeness, a quantum number which he also discovered.

He developed the V−A theory of the weak interaction in collaboration with Richard Feynman. In the 1960s, he introduced current algebra as a method of systematically exploiting symmetries to extract predictions from quark models, in the absence of reliable dynamical theory. This method led to model-independent sum rules confirmed by experiment and provided starting points underpinning the development of the Standard Model (SM), the widely accepted theory of elementary particles.

Gell-Mann, along with Maurice Lévy, developed the sigma model of pions, which describes low-energy pion interactions. Modifying the integer-charged quark model of Moo-Young Han and Yoichiro Nambu, Harald Fritzsch and Gell-Mann were the first to write down the modern accepted theory of quantum chromodynamics, although they did not anticipate asymptotic freedom. In 1969 he received the Nobel Prize in physics for his contributions and discoveries concerning the classification of elementary particles and their interactions.[20]
Gell-Mann was responsible, together with Pierre Ramond and Richard Slansky, and independently of Peter Minkowski, Rabindra Mohapatra, Goran Senjanovic, Sheldon Lee Glashow, and Tsutomu Yanagida, for the seesaw theory of neutrino masses, that produces masses at the large scale in any theory with a right-handed neutrino. He is also known to have played a large role in keeping string theory alive through the 1970s and early 1980s, supporting that line of research at a time when it was unpopular.

Gell-Mann was a proponent of the consistent histories approach to understanding quantum mechanics.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murray_Gell-Mann
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Gell-Mann established theoretically that protons and neutrons are not fundamental particles.

The proton:

[Image: 220px-Quark_structure_proton.svg.png]

Two ups and one down

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proton


The neutron:

[Image: 250px-Quark_structure_neutron.svg.png]
Two downs and an up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutron

Mnemonic for memorization of the distinction:

A professional must double up with the learning in his field, lest he go doubly down and neuter his chance for success.

The 'up' quark has a charge is +2/3, and the 'down' quark has a charge of -1/3.

Unless someone else came up with a better mnemonic, please give me the credit.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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One of the last Navajo code talkers of WWII -- and at the time of his death, almost certainly one of the last active GI politicians at any level of government. The Navajo language was in practice one of the hardest military codes to crack...



 John Pinto (December 15, 1924 – May 24, 2019)[1][2] was an American politician.[3][4] He served as a Democratic member of the New Mexico Senate from 1977 to his death in 2019, making him the longest-serving member in the Senate. Pinto represented the 3rd District, which includes the Four Corners area and spans much of western San Juan County, as well as a portion of western McKinley County. Much of the district is made up of the Navajo Nation; it includes the towns of Shiprock, Sheep Springs, and most if not all of Gallup.

Pinto was born in Lupton, Arizona, in the Navajo Nation.[4] Pinto served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II and was a Navajo code talker. He was a teacher and organizer for the National Educational Association.[4] He died in Gallup, New Mexico, on May 24, 2019.[5][6]

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Pinto



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Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham @GovMLG
 
Through relationships he built & respect he earned, he was able to secure innumerable crucial investments for New Mexicans, in particular Native communities. His record of service is unblemished, & his unwavering commitment to his people will forever serve as a shining example.
[Image: aYnOUJag_normal.jpg]

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham @GovMLG
[url=https://twitter.com/GovMLG]
Senator John Pinto was a New Mexico icon and an American hero. I will miss his good humor, as will everyone at the Capitol, and I offer my deepest condolences to his loved ones, his family and friends. pic.twitter.com/oAectRmWQi





[Image: D7Wz6FqUcAAJR2F?format=jpg&name=small]
Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has ordered all state flags to fly at half-staff.

https://www.krqe.com/news/new-mexico/sen...2024944522
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(05-24-2019, 04:10 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Serial murderer and rapist Bobbie Joe Long, a/k/a the "Classified-Ads killer" of the Tampa-St. Petersburg area. Execution by lethal execution.

Before anyone cheers, this fellow had a messed-up life beginning with a double-X chromosome and lots of injuries,including head injuries.

Good riddance. Btw I have been sexually violated as a child and raped repetitively. I also have had lots of injuries including head injuries and I suffer cptsd because of trash like that, yet I don't go round raping and killing people. No excuse. Glad he is dead. People like that deserve that.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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(05-25-2019, 04:07 AM)taramarie Wrote:
(05-24-2019, 04:10 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Serial murderer and rapist Bobbie Joe Long, a/k/a the "Classified-Ads killer" of the Tampa-St. Petersburg area. Execution by lethal execution.

Before anyone cheers, this fellow had a messed-up life beginning with a double-X chromosome and lots of injuries,including head injuries.

Good riddance. Btw I have been sexually violated as a child and raped repetitively. I also have had lots of injuries including head injuries and I suffer cptsd because of trash like that, yet I don't go round raping and killing people. No excuse. Glad he is dead. People like that deserve that.

Rebellion is always risky, but there is always one thing against which one must rebel: evil, including any evil that was done to oneself. One aspect of such a rebellion is that one insist that the victimization stop with oneself.

I'm not an advocate of suicide, but if one has a great desire to do a horrific crime, then suicide is a cure. (Others that I would excuse are killing oneself to avoid being tortured into betraying others who would themselves be killed, or protecting state secrets that might be used against one's country especially in wartime).

It took 35 years to get him from Death Row to death... one of the problems with the American death penalty is that one could be on Death Row so long that one becomes a very different person. That was unlikely with that creep; see another monster that he surely met, the infamous Ted Bundy.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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