Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
GPS makes you dumber
#21
(07-20-2017, 05:57 PM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote: A brief comment on the original comment on how GPS makes you dumber.

There were earlier echoes of this.  As the frontier vanished and more people moved to the cities, people thought we were loosing wilderness survival skills...  which we were.  One response was the Boy Scouts of America attempting to keep the old skills alive.

I have also thought the GI good with their hands.  If it was broke, they could fix it.  That seems to be fading as well.

I suspect that as technology and culture shift, the most useful skill sets shift as well.  Overall, I would say the new internet and computer technology is putting a lot more information in the users hand, even if how to get the same information using dated hard copy methods becomes forgotten.

By and large this is mostly true.  Though there is still a large component of those who can still fix most things (my husband for example, he may teach history at the local child prison school but he can fix just about anything).  But I have noticed that my kid has difficulty using the card catalog (yes our library still has one though they plan on phasing it out soon), but can fix my mother's computer faster than I can.

In all honesty most of her problems are related to her poor choices, but I've eventually convinced her to leave any antivirus I put on there alone, so there are fewer problems.

That being said, in my previous posts I was complining of a stunning lack of common sense.  If the GPS machine is telling you to drive somewhere, but the road signs are saying detour, you follow the road signs.  When in doubt find yourself a local and ask for directions.  Most people will give them to you if you ask politely.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
Reply
#22
(07-20-2017, 09:37 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(07-20-2017, 05:57 PM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote: A brief comment on the original comment on how GPS makes you dumber.

There were earlier echoes of this.  As the frontier vanished and more people moved to the cities, people thought we were loosing wilderness survival skills...  which we were.  One response was the Boy Scouts of America attempting to keep the old skills alive.

I have also thought the GI good with their hands.  If it was broke, they could fix it.  That seems to be fading as well.

I suspect that as technology and culture shift, the most useful skill sets shift as well.  Overall, I would say the new internet and computer technology is putting a lot more information in the users hand, even if how to get the same information using dated hard copy methods becomes forgotten.


Note also that our objects are getting more complicated and intricate. If they are necessarily manufactured by a machine or robot, then we can hardly expect to repair those objects.

A Model-T Ford was so designed that the average person could repair it if it broke down.  Contemporary cars? Could you replace or  repair a catalytic converter? Or the car's air conditioner or radio? Obviously the car from a century ago had no radio, air conditioner, or  catalytic converter.

Repairability and maintainability is an engineering discipline unto its self. However, it requires lots of diligence and creativity early in the design process. Often times, a designer resents input from experts in this field, because it forces the designer into certain constraints and may slightly increase the overall part count (especially interconnects and fasteners). Also on that score, enter also the bean counter. Still, having highly repairable and maintainable cars, consumer electronics, etc, is very possible. Were humanity to adopt a true Green philosophy, maintainability and repairability would be easily justified due to their reduction of total life cycle costs born currently by The Commons and the consumer. BTW, the same features of good maintainability and repairability also tend to make field upgrades far more viable, just saying.
#ImpeachTrump
#ProsecuteTreason
#HUAC2.0
#RealNationalism
#NaziPunksFOff


Mark 13:22 - "For there shall rise false Christs and false prophets, and they shall give signs and wonders, to seduce, if possible, also the chosen."


Reply
#23
(07-21-2017, 10:11 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: Reparability and maintainability is an engineering discipline unto its self. However, it requires lots of diligence and creativity early in the design process. Often times, a designer resents input from experts in this field, because it forces the designer into certain constraints and may slightly increase the overall part count (especially interconnects and fasteners). Also on that score, enter also the bean counter. Still, having highly repairable and maintainable cars, consumer electronics, etc, is very possible. Were humanity to adopt a true Green philosophy, maintainability and reparability would be easily justified due to their reduction of total life cycle costs born currently by The Commons and the consumer. BTW, the same features of good maintainability and reparability also tend to make field upgrades far more viable, just saying.

As the use of automated fabrication increases, the cost of goods drop.  This is a net good, but it also makes reparability a less valuable trait.  Yes, an iPhone costs a lot at retail, but it actually costs less than $20 to make.  Why not just replace it under a long term warranty plan, and everyone comes out ahead ... or so the logic goes. 

Few things are fully worth the cost of repairing them anymore, and those that are need special tools and/or expertise.  When you send that failed iPhone off to be "recycled", it may be repaired or scrapped, but it won't be repaired by an old-time bench technician with a few hand tools and a soldering iron.  It's a quick turn or salvage.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
Reply
#24
(07-21-2017, 10:11 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote:
(07-20-2017, 09:37 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(07-20-2017, 05:57 PM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote: A brief comment on the original comment on how GPS makes you dumber.

There were earlier echoes of this.  As the frontier vanished and more people moved to the cities, people thought we were loosing wilderness survival skills...  which we were.  One response was the Boy Scouts of America attempting to keep the old skills alive.

I have also thought the GI good with their hands.  If it was broke, they could fix it.  That seems to be fading as well.

I suspect that as technology and culture shift, the most useful skill sets shift as well.  Overall, I would say the new internet and computer technology is putting a lot more information in the users hand, even if how to get the same information using dated hard copy methods becomes forgotten.


Note also that our objects are getting more complicated and intricate. If they are necessarily manufactured by a machine or robot, then we can hardly expect to repair those objects.

A Model-T Ford was so designed that the average person could repair it if it broke down.  Contemporary cars? Could you replace or  repair a catalytic converter? Or the car's air conditioner or radio? Obviously the car from a century ago had no radio, air conditioner, or  catalytic converter.

Repairability and maintainability is an engineering discipline unto its self. However, it requires lots of diligence and creativity early in the design process. Often times, a designer resents input from experts in this field, because it forces the designer into certain constraints and may slightly increase the overall part count (especially interconnects and fasteners). Also on that score, enter also the bean counter. Still, having highly repairable and maintainable cars, consumer electronics, etc, is very possible. Were humanity to adopt a true Green philosophy, maintainability and repairability would be easily justified due to their reduction of total life cycle costs born currently by The Commons and the consumer. BTW, the same features of good maintainability and repairability also tend to make field upgrades far more viable, just saying.


Let's also remember -- the Model-T Ford broke down often. It would be terribly unsafe by modern standards. Lacking a fuel pump the car relied upon gravity to drive the fuel, so people often drove it in reverse up a hill so that they could get to the top of a hill. Ease of repair implies that it has much less to repair.  Of course the Tin Lizzie is much too slow for modern highways, so it is no longer street-usable unless it has a modified (and thus non-genuine) engine.

But much that is truly modern is reliable enough. I have a ten-year-old flat-screen TV that has never needed a repair. The design was apparently really, really good. I suspect that obsolescence is more likely to cause me to give it up than a mechanical breakdown.

For real sustainability, technology can allow self-repair, as with computers. I expect self-repair to become a norm for robots and spacecraft.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


Reply
#25
(07-25-2017, 09:16 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: But much that is truly modern is reliable enough. I have a ten-year-old flat-screen TV that has never needed a repair. The design was apparently really, really good. I suspect that obsolescence is more likely to cause me to give it up than a mechanical breakdown.

Part of that is basic differences in technology. Vacuum tubes were just going to need replacement. If you have filaments throwing subatomic particles out into the wild, they will eventually burn out.

This isn't to say that several more decades refining designs didn't help.

I recently traded an old car (2004) for a new (2016). The salesman claimed that the total number of moving parts had gone from around 7,000 to 70,000. I suspect his method of counting 'moving' parts is creative and unusual, but the point is there. Design approaches are definitely shifting.
Reply
#26
(07-25-2017, 11:16 AM)David Horn Wrote:
(07-21-2017, 10:11 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: Reparability and maintainability is an engineering discipline unto its self. However, it requires lots of diligence and creativity early in the design process. Often times, a designer resents input from experts in this field, because it forces the designer into certain constraints and may slightly increase the overall part count (especially interconnects and fasteners). Also on that score, enter also the bean counter. Still, having highly repairable and maintainable cars, consumer electronics, etc, is very possible. Were humanity to adopt a true Green philosophy, maintainability and reparability would be easily justified due to their reduction of total life cycle costs born currently by The Commons and the consumer. BTW, the same features of good maintainability and reparability also tend to make field upgrades far more viable, just saying.

As the use of automated fabrication increases, the cost of goods drop.  This is a net good, but it also makes reparability a less valuable trait.  Yes, an iPhone costs a lot at retail, but it actually costs less than $20 to make.  Why not just replace it under a long term warranty plan, and everyone comes out ahead ... or so the logic goes. 

Few things are fully worth the cost of repairing them anymore, and those that are need special tools and/or expertise.  When you send that failed iPhone off to be "recycled", it may be repaired or scrapped, but it won't be repaired by an old-time bench technician with a few hand tools and a soldering iron.  It's a quick turn or salvage.

The principle can even by applied to an iPhone. An iPhone or any other small consumer electronic item can be designed with a base configuration, that has certain core elements not likely to change from generation to generation, and, a feature module, that has the whiz bang. New generations would mean new feature modules not entirely new devices.
#ImpeachTrump
#ProsecuteTreason
#HUAC2.0
#RealNationalism
#NaziPunksFOff


Mark 13:22 - "For there shall rise false Christs and false prophets, and they shall give signs and wonders, to seduce, if possible, also the chosen."


Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)