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Science and Buddhism Agree: There is No 'You' There
#21
I have not been following the de Broglie–Bohm theory and find this an interesting development.


Quote:New Support for Alternative Quantum View

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160517-...l-support/

“Of the many counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics, perhaps the most challenging to our notions of common sense is that particles do not have locations until they are observed. This is exactly what the standard view of quantum mechanics, often called the Copenhagen interpretation, asks us to believe.”…

… "But there’s another view — one that’s been around for almost a century — in which particles really do have precise positions at all times. This alternative view, known as pilot-wave theory or Bohemian mechanics, never became as popular as the Copenhagen view, in part because Bohemian mechanics implies that the world must be strange in other ways.”…… "a group of scientists has carried out an experiment in a Toronto laboratory that aims to test this idea. And if their results, first reported earlier this year, hold up to scrutiny, the Bohemian view of quantum mechanics — less fuzzy but in some ways more strange than the traditional view — may be poised for a comeback.”…

… "Bohmian mechanics was worked out by Louis de Broglie in 1927 and again, independently, by David Bohm in 1952, who developed it further until his death in 1992. (It’s also sometimes called the de Broglie–Bohm theory.) As with the Copenhagen view, there’s a wave function governed by the Schrödinger equation. In addition, every particle has an actual, definite location, even when it’s not being observed.”…
… "In the Bohmian view, nonlocality is even more conspicuous. The trajectory of any one particle depends on what all the other particles described by the same wave function are doing. And, critically, the wave function has no geographic limits; it might, in principle, span the entire universe. Which means that the universe is weirdly interdependent, even across vast stretches of space. The wave function “combines — or binds — distant particles into a single irreducible reality,” as Sheldon Goldstein, a mathematician and physicist at Rutgers University, has written.”…
 … whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Phil 4:8 (ESV)
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#22
(05-16-2016, 01:43 PM)Kinser79 Wrote: ...    I'm kinda sexist when it comes to Drs.  I don't like being worked on by women, makes me uncomfortable.  Particularly GPs when I have to discuss male issues with the Dr.

Really!?

My primary care doc is a young woman as are both of my dentists.  I've had men docs and dentists and have to say that my current providers are head and shoulders the best I've ever had.

At work, I partner with both men and women paramedics.  Just as a VERY subjective comment, I'd say that the women paramedics are about 60:40 bette than the guys.

My "sexist" comment is that it strikes me that women seem to be able to juggle many variables (multi-task) slightly better than guys. Maybe we get task-oriented, and perhaps have a better ability to prioritize and then focus on just the top one or two priorities where the women "focus" on most or all of the variables.
[fon‌t=Arial Black]"... a man of notoriously vicious and intemperate disposition."[/font]
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#23
(05-18-2016, 07:48 PM)TnT Wrote:
(05-16-2016, 01:43 PM)Kinser79 Wrote: ...    I'm kinda sexist when it comes to Drs.  I don't like being worked on by women, makes me uncomfortable.  Particularly GPs when I have to discuss male issues with the Dr.

Really!?

My primary care doc is a young woman as are both of my dentists.  I've had men docs and dentists and have to say that my current providers are head and shoulders the best I've ever had.

Our experiences vary then. My experiences with female doctors are not so positive. I find it nearly impossible to get a straight answer from them. Probably because they feel the need to be compassionate or some such nonsense. I don't go to a doctor for compassion, I go to a doctor to be treated and to get better.

I also seek out older doctors as opposed to younger ones. I find that experience tones down some of their hubris--which I've had to put up with because I'm a doctor's nightmare having an RN mother and having been around both Drs. and the Health Care sector my entire life.

Quote:My "sexist" comment is that it strikes me that women seem to be able to juggle many variables (multi-task) slightly better than guys. Maybe we get task-oriented, and perhaps have a better ability to prioritize and then focus on just the top one or two priorities where the women "focus" on most or all of the variables.

Multi-tasking is a myth. That said women are better at changing tasks more rapidly then men. Unfortunately at the expense of prioritizing the most important tasks, usually.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#24
(05-18-2016, 07:48 PM)TnT Wrote:
(05-16-2016, 01:43 PM)Kinser79 Wrote: ...    I'm kinda sexist when it comes to Drs.  I don't like being worked on by women, makes me uncomfortable.  Particularly GPs when I have to discuss male issues with the Dr.

Really!?

My primary care doc is a young woman as are both of my dentists.  I've had men docs and dentists and have to say that my current providers are head and shoulders the best I've ever had.

At work, I partner with both men and women paramedics.  Just as a VERY subjective comment, I'd say that the women paramedics are about 60:40 bette than the guys.

My "sexist" comment is that it strikes me that women seem to be able to juggle many variables (multi-task) slightly better than guys. Maybe we get task-oriented, and perhaps have a better ability to prioritize and then focus on just the top one or two priorities where the women "focus" on most or all of the variables.
I have a woman doctor of Indian descent; she's wonderful so far, and rather direct. And, lots of nurses in these clinics to "work on me;" nothing remarkable about it.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#25
(05-17-2016, 02:48 PM)radind Wrote: I have not been following the de Broglie–Bohm theory and find this an interesting development.


Quote:New Support for Alternative Quantum View

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160517-...l-support/

“Of the many counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics, perhaps the most challenging to our notions of common sense is that particles do not have locations until they are observed. This is exactly what the standard view of quantum mechanics, often called the Copenhagen interpretation, asks us to believe.”…

… "But there’s another view — one that’s been around for almost a century — in which particles really do have precise positions at all times. This alternative view, known as pilot-wave theory or Bohemian mechanics, never became as popular as the Copenhagen view, in part because Bohemian mechanics implies that the world must be strange in other ways.”…… "a group of scientists has carried out an experiment in a Toronto laboratory that aims to test this idea. And if their results, first reported earlier this year, hold up to scrutiny, the Bohemian view of quantum mechanics — less fuzzy but in some ways more strange than the traditional view — may be poised for a comeback.”…

… "Bohmian mechanics was worked out by Louis de Broglie in 1927 and again, independently, by David Bohm in 1952, who developed it further until his death in 1992. (It’s also sometimes called the de Broglie–Bohm theory.) As with the Copenhagen view, there’s a wave function governed by the Schrödinger equation. In addition, every particle has an actual, definite location, even when it’s not being observed.”…
… "In the Bohmian view, nonlocality is even more conspicuous. The trajectory of any one particle depends on what all the other particles described by the same wave function are doing. And, critically, the wave function has no geographic limits; it might, in principle, span the entire universe. Which means that the universe is weirdly interdependent, even across vast stretches of space. The wave function “combines — or binds — distant particles into a single irreducible reality,” as Sheldon Goldstein, a mathematician and physicist at Rutgers University, has written.”…
Sounds like more good quantum stuff to learn more about. I suspect both the earlier fuzzy aspects and the newer non-local aspects will remain within the theory, as it more-and-more puts the old materialism out to pasture. Interdependence of the universe has been known about at least since Buddha taught it; science has its own very-slow way of testing and verifying and calculating, but the truth is the truth and it wins out over the lies eventually!
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#26
(05-19-2016, 10:49 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: [quote pid='803' dateline='1463514504']
Quote:...    science has its own very-slow way of testing and verifying and calculating, but the truth is the truth and it wins out over the lies eventually!



A "lie" is the purposeful statement of something that the person knows for a fact to be false.  That's simply not how good science works.  That's why you and so many others who misunderstand the scientific method go awry.

Many, many hypotheses are proposed in good faith by good scientists.  And many of these are dashed on the rocks of good experimentation.  That does not mean that these folks were lying.

"Truth" only "wins out" if people of good faith seek it out.  Folks who cling fanatically to doctrine of one kind or another often lose ground, and move away from good sense. 

I like what my man James Hollis, Ph.D. says in one of his books ... "Embrace ambiguity!"  It keeps the mind open for other possibilities.
[fon‌t=Arial Black]"... a man of notoriously vicious and intemperate disposition."[/font]
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#27
(05-19-2016, 10:49 AM)Eric the Green Wrote:
(05-17-2016, 02:48 PM)radind Wrote: I have not been following the de Broglie–Bohm theory and find this an interesting development.


Quote:New Support for Alternative Quantum View

https://www.quantamagazine.org/20160517-...l-support/

“Of the many counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics, perhaps the most challenging to our notions of common sense is that particles do not have locations until they are observed. This is exactly what the standard view of quantum mechanics, often called the Copenhagen interpretation, asks us to believe.”…

… "But there’s another view — one that’s been around for almost a century — in which particles really do have precise positions at all times. This alternative view, known as pilot-wave theory or Bohemian mechanics, never became as popular as the Copenhagen view, in part because Bohemian mechanics implies that the world must be strange in other ways.”…… "a group of scientists has carried out an experiment in a Toronto laboratory that aims to test this idea. And if their results, first reported earlier this year, hold up to scrutiny, the Bohemian view of quantum mechanics — less fuzzy but in some ways more strange than the traditional view — may be poised for a comeback.”…

… "Bohmian mechanics was worked out by Louis de Broglie in 1927 and again, independently, by David Bohm in 1952, who developed it further until his death in 1992. (It’s also sometimes called the de Broglie–Bohm theory.) As with the Copenhagen view, there’s a wave function governed by the Schrödinger equation. In addition, every particle has an actual, definite location, even when it’s not being observed.”…
… "In the Bohmian view, nonlocality is even more conspicuous. The trajectory of any one particle depends on what all the other particles described by the same wave function are doing. And, critically, the wave function has no geographic limits; it might, in principle, span the entire universe. Which means that the universe is weirdly interdependent, even across vast stretches of space. The wave function “combines — or binds — distant particles into a single irreducible reality,” as Sheldon Goldstein, a mathematician and physicist at Rutgers University, has written.”…
Sounds like more good quantum stuff to learn more about. I suspect both the earlier fuzzy aspects and the newer non-local aspects will remain within the theory, as it more-and-more puts the old materialism out to pasture. Interdependence of the universe has been known about at least since Buddha taught it; science has its own very-slow way of testing and verifying and calculating, but the truth is the truth and it wins out over the lies eventually!
  The Copenhagen view will be hard to displace, but I am intrigued with the de Broglie–Bohm  theory. It would be good to know the truth, however, I like the view of Popper( " Conjectures and Refutations") that one cannot prove the theories, you can only try to refute them. So, we may never know the 'truth' and I don't think there are so many lies, just a lack of understanding.
 … whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Phil 4:8 (ESV)
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