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Trump brought the Regeneracy, just not in the way he expected.
#21
(03-10-2017, 02:44 PM)Odin Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 12:47 PM)Kinser79 Wrote: Actually this proves only that you've not listened to Richard Spencer or Jared Taylor amongst others.  They are certainly white identitarians but they are hardly fascists as they also make the case for less state power and not more.  Fascism has a meaning, it is an ideology and it has various forms that are universal.  Don't be confused by the absence of of swastikas and hoods--if you want American Fascism it will come wrapped in the disguise of anti-racism and social justice.

Spencer is literally a Neo-Nazi. The rest of your post is ignorant rambling.

Well for a Neo-Nazi he seems to really be lacking on the hating jews and hating negroes department. Considering I've read his writings and you've not I think I'm clearly more expert on what he has to say.

Like PBR the Dunning-Kruger is strong with this one as well. I suppose I should count my blessings though, unlike some others you've not demonstrated symptoms of mental illness.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#22
Quote:Because, as this article shows, it's no longer business as usual. Trump is waking a lot of people up out of their apathy and that is only going to grow as time goes by.


He did certainly wake a lot of people out of their apathy.  Not all of them progressives.  It will be interesting to see how that plays out.

Quote:Additionally, the US is due for a recession and Trump and the GOP is sure to exacerbate any downturn, leading to the Rust Belt to turn on him.

We are due for another recession during the next 4 years, although as the recovery has occurred mainly in the asset markets and tech sectors, it remains to be seen what said recession would actually look like.

As to whether the Rust Belt turns on him, I suppose that question turns on the extent to which he is seen to be moving towards his actual campaign promises.  Obama was given a great deal of latitude by his supporters because they blamed his lack of progress on his opposition.  This does not mean that Trump will necessarily be given the same, only that it is a possible outcome.

Quote:Also, gerrymandering, ironically, makes the Republicans particularly vulnerable in a "throw the bums out" wave election.

That could happen, although with the way partisan sentiment is, in many of those districts said attitude could play out in primaries more so than in the general election.

But thanks for clearing up where you were coming from with that statement.
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#23
(03-10-2017, 02:59 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Obama was given a great deal of latitude by his supporters because they blamed his lack of progress on his opposition.

And this is exactly why I don't think Trump will get not nearly as much latitude, Trump's party controls Congress so he can't use the "obstructionism" excuse.
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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#24
(03-10-2017, 03:17 PM)Odin Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 02:59 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Obama was given a great deal of latitude by his supporters because they blamed his lack of progress on his opposition.

And this is exactly why I don't think Trump will get not nearly as much latitude, Trump's party controls Congress so he can't use the "obstructionism" excuse.

Sure he can, he can just blame "Washington".  Remember who his constituents are.
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#25
(03-10-2017, 12:17 PM)Kinser79 Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 04:29 AM)Galen Wrote: It seems to me that the scale of government may very well go down.  In the second leg of the economic crisis we have been in since 2008 and the inability of the state to deal with it will definitely make state solutions much less credible.  In a very real sense the Soviet Union went down because people, including those running it, ceased to believe in it.

Quite likely.  From where I sit, and from whom I talk to (which is just about everyone in town--seriously you have no idea how many different people want to come into a donut shop for donuts and coffee) it seems that most people view the government, an Federal Government in particular as extremely ineffective at doing just about anything.

Long ago I once worked in a Donut shop and you do encounter quite a number of people and so you can get a very good feel for the mood of the public.  It is also a great place to learn how corrupt the police really are.  Strangely, I am encountering a great loss in faith by the Millies in the American Civic Religion which I consider to be a good thing.  Its amazing how quickly the public school indoctrination fades in the face of real life kicking the shit out of you.


(03-10-2017, 12:17 PM)Kinser79 Wrote: Strangely it seems to me that Demitri Orlov was the one who first proposed that the US collapse would be very like the Soviet one.

Never heard of him but empires tend to go out the same way.  As bad as the Soviet collapse was, it was still better than what happened when Rome went down.  It took the better part of a thousand years for Europe to recover from that.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
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#26
With Millies it seems the public civic cult is strongest with those who have a college education. Those who went to trade schools or employment out of high school have already judged "the American dream" to be "a dream because you have to be asleep to believe it" as a great stand up philosopher once said. That being said the importance of the civic religion is minuscule to the proletariat, and has been since ancient times. It is when the Outter party as Orwell would put it defects that collapse is inevitable.

This happened in the USSR and in Rome as well. That being said I don't know if US collapse will be more like Rome or more like the USSR.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#27
Well considering that those colleges (especially the old liberal arts ones) have essentially reverted to their historical roles as "vicar-mills" for the dominant belief system, and competition for paid positions is fierce, it's not so surprising.
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#28
What exactly are you guys meaning here by the "American Civil Religion"? Huh
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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#29
(03-10-2017, 03:48 PM)Odin Wrote: What exactly are you guys meaning here by the "American Civil Religion"? Huh

You seriously don't know or are you simply being intentionally obtuse?

Think about what Galen and myself are and what I suspect SomeGuy to be.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#30
Trolls?  Tongue
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#31
(03-10-2017, 04:14 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Trolls?  Tongue

Well I can't speak for Galen.  But besides that....

I was thinking more along the lines of Libertarians, or Classical Liberals, or Civic Nationalists.  Take your pick.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#32
[Image: chabane-troll-under-bridge-fantasy-paint...ay-sad.jpg]
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#33
(03-10-2017, 03:44 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Well considering that those colleges (especially the old liberal arts ones) have essentially reverted to their historical roles as "vicar-mills" for the dominant belief system, and competition for paid positions is fierce, it's not so surprising.

Molyneux has more or less said the same thing so you aren't only one to notice that.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
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#34
Ah, so the "Cultural Marxists" conspiracy theory. Rolleyes
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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#35
(03-10-2017, 03:48 PM)Odin Wrote: What exactly are you guys meaning here by the "American Civil Religion"? Huh

I realize that being so outraged can take a great of time but would you please grow a clue already.  Just follow the link to Wikipedia in the hope of gaining some enlightenment.  For crying out loud stop reading Salon, its rotting your brain.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
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#36
(03-10-2017, 04:14 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Trolls?  Tongue

In my case libertarian but in the minds of the clueless that amounts to the same thing.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
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#37
(03-10-2017, 04:38 PM)Odin Wrote: Ah, so the "Cultural Marxists" conspiracy theory. Rolleyes

More like belief in the state is just another religious dogma theory.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
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#38
(03-10-2017, 04:35 PM)Galen Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 03:44 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Well considering that those colleges (especially the old liberal arts ones) have essentially reverted to their historical roles as "vicar-mills" for the dominant belief system, and competition for paid positions is fierce, it's not so surprising.

Molyneux has more or less said the same thing so you aren't only one to notice that.

Lots of people have said it.  I wasn't claiming to have originated it.
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#39
(03-10-2017, 04:44 PM)SomeGuy Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 04:35 PM)Galen Wrote:
(03-10-2017, 03:44 PM)SomeGuy Wrote: Well considering that those colleges (especially the old liberal arts ones) have essentially reverted to their historical roles as "vicar-mills" for the dominant belief system, and competition for paid positions is fierce, it's not so surprising.

Molyneux has more or less said the same thing so you aren't only one to notice that.

Lots of people have said it.  I wasn't claiming to have originated it.

Not where I was going.  More like that realization is becoming common knowledge which would imply that the college degree bubble may be nearing its demise.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
Reply
#40
(03-10-2017, 04:44 PM)Galen Wrote: More like belief in the state is just another religious dogma theory.

A fanatical Libertarian calling others out for "dogma" is rather rich! Big Grin
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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