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Cleveland Indians dropping the name "Indians"
#1
Todd Dybas
Sun, December 13, 2020, 9:44 PM EST·2 min read



Report: Indians follow in WFT footsteps, will change name originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington
The New York Times reported Sunday night the Cleveland Indians will be changing their nickname.
The alteration follows years of protests deriding the name as racist, putting Cleveland in position to reconsider, then subsequently change the nickname, akin to the Washington Football Team.


What’s next is unclear, according to the Times. The paper said the change could come as soon as next week. Cleveland manager Terry Francona is scheduled to meet with reporters Monday via Zoom as part of widespread media opportunities with managers that would typically take place at the winter meetings.


But any move to unbrand a more-than-century-old sports franchise nickname involves several layers. Merchandising concerns, signage, memorabilia. It will all have to be quickly changed since spring training -- should it start on time -- is roughly two months away.


A possibility for Cleveland is to replicate what the Washington Football Team did: eliminate the offensive nickname, then move forward without it while deciphering what to do next. Fans need to be consulted. Reworking uniforms and logos will be ongoing. Cleveland began removing logos and imagery of its cartoon mascot, Chief Wahoo, throughout 2019, moves which now appear to be a precursor to the more dramatic alteration reported Sunday night.
Cleveland began playing in the American League in 1901. It is one of Major League Baseball’s legacy franchises with six World Series appearances, two wins and a slew of star players from Tris Speaker to Francisco Lindor. Thirteen players from Cleveland are in the Hall of Fame. Only four teams -- the Yankees, New York Giants, St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs -- can claim more.


A “thorough review” of the Cleveland baseball team’s nickname began in July, shortly after the Washington Football Team formally dropped its previous nickname. The team went on to consult with state and national Native American groups. Meanwhile, Chief Wahoo was phased out following a 2018 announcement and replaced with a block “C” on uniforms and signage in 2019.


Now, a new nickname, new logo and new path forward all need to be determined.


https://sports.yahoo.com/report-clevelan...17489.html
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#2
(Hank) Aaron’s death prompts call to change name: Braves to Hammers

ATLANTA (AP) — As his adopted hometown mourned Hank Aaron’s death, some fans called on the Atlanta Braves to change their name to the Hammers in his honor.

“Hammerin’ Hank” died Friday at age 86, drawing praise from all segments of society — including the current and former presidents — for his Hall of Fame career and providing inspiration to Black Americans by overcoming intense racism in his pursuit of baseball’s home run record.

The governors of both Georgia and Alabama ordered flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of Aaron — the Hammer was born in the port city of Mobile and called Atlanta home for much of his life.


The NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, Major League Soccer’s Atlanta United and Georgia Tech’s football team all announced they would retire Aaron’s trademark No. 44 for their 2021 seasons. The number was long ago retired by the Braves.

“May generations of Georgians continue to be inspired by his groundbreaking career and tremendous impact on our state and nation,” Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey added, “He inspired many young boys and girls to pursue their dreams and pursue excellence in whatever they do.”

The Braves opened up Truist Park to fans for the first time since the 2019 season, allowing them to pay socially distanced tribute to Aaron on Friday and Saturday at his statue located in a monument garden on the main stadium concourse.

Other fans paid tribute at a display honoring his 715th homer, which is in a parking lot for the stadium formerly known as Turner Field. The site was the home of Atlanta Fulton-County Stadium, where the Braves played for 31 seasons after moving from Milwaukee in 1966.

The stadium was imploded after Turner Field became the Braves’ new home in 1997, but a small section of fencing, a wall and a sign mark the spot where No. 715 broke Babe Ruth’s hallowed home run record in 1974. Aaron finished his career with 755 homers, a standard that has since been eclipsed by Barry Bonds.

The Hammer spent nearly all of his 23-year career with the Braves, whose nickname has drawn some criticism as being offensive to Native Americans.

Social media buzzed with calls to change the moniker to match Aaron’s nickname. There was even a fledgling online petition backing the idea.

“The renaming serves two important purposes: 1) It honors an icon who represented our city with grace and dignity for more than half a century, and 2) It removes the stain on the city of having a team name that dishonors Native and Indigenous people, especially given one of the greatest tragedies in American History, the Trail of Tears, began in the region the team calls home,” the petition said.

The Braves have steadfastly resisted calls to change their name, saying they view it as a tribute to Native Americans rather than a slur.

But the team did take steps during the 2019 playoffs to downplay symbols of its nickname after St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Ryan Helsley — a member of the Cherokee Nation — said he found the team’s “Tomahawk Chop” chant offensive.

The team did not distribute red foam tomahawks before the decisive Game 5 of the series, won by the Cardinals, and also halted the playing of rhythmic music that prompts fans to break into the arm-swinging chop.

Braves officials have not said whether those moves will be permanent when fans are allowed to return to games, but it has removed a “Chop On” sign that was near the entrance to Truist Park.

In recent months, some fans began coming up with a possible new logo that replaced the team’s trademark tomahawk with a similar-looking hammer.

There has been no indication that Aaron’s death would change the team’s stance on its Braves nickname. The NL’s oldest franchise began using Braves more than 100 years ago while its played in its original home in Boston.

The team changed its name to the Bees in 1936, a move that lasted until it reverted back to the Braves in 1941.

Last year, the Washington NFL Team dropped its longtime nickname, which Meriam-Webster defined as “insulting and contemptuous.” Baseball’s Cleveland Indians have announced they will change their nickname as well, though not until after the 2021 season.

The Braves are among several big league teams that still use Native American-inspired monikers, including the NFL’s Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, the NBA’s Golden State Warriors and the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks.

Aaron also was honored in Milwaukee, where the Hammer began his big league career and helped lead the Braves to the 1957 World Series title. He returned to the city at the end of his career, playing his final two seasons with the Brewers, and regularly visited over the years for charity events.

The Brewers plan to wear a “44” patch on their jersey sleeves throughout the 2021 season.

“His contributions to the game of baseball and the community of Milwaukee created a legacy that is cherished and will never be forgotten,” Brewers owner Mark Attanasio said.

Bob Uecker, who was Aaron’s teammate in Milwaukee during the 1960s and went on to greater fame as a Hall of Fame broadcaster, remembered his longtime friend.

“I will always cherish my time with Hank, and with (his wife) Billye — all the laughs we shared, and all the unforgettable stories,” Uecker said. ”Hank loved Wisconsin, and we loved him back.”

https://apnews.com/article/nfl-mlb-nba-r...052e487ad4
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#3
(01-23-2021, 11:41 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: (Hank) Aaron’s death prompts call to change name: Braves to Hammers

ATLANTA (AP) — As his adopted hometown mourned Hank Aaron’s death, some fans called on the Atlanta Braves to change their name to the Hammers in his honor.

“Hammerin’ Hank” died Friday at age 86, drawing praise from all segments of society — including the current and former presidents — for his Hall of Fame career and providing inspiration to Black Americans by overcoming intense racism in his pursuit of baseball’s home run record.

The governors of both Georgia and Alabama ordered flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of Aaron — the Hammer was born in the port city of Mobile and called Atlanta home for much of his life.


The NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, Major League Soccer’s Atlanta United and Georgia Tech’s football team all announced they would retire Aaron’s trademark No. 44 for their 2021 seasons. The number was long ago retired by the Braves.

“May generations of Georgians continue to be inspired by his groundbreaking career and tremendous impact on our state and nation,” Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey added, “He inspired many young boys and girls to pursue their dreams and pursue excellence in whatever they do.”

The Braves opened up Truist Park to fans for the first time since the 2019 season, allowing them to pay socially distanced tribute to Aaron on Friday and Saturday at his statue located in a monument garden on the main stadium concourse.

Other fans paid tribute at a display honoring his 715th homer, which is in a parking lot for the stadium formerly known as Turner Field. The site was the home of Atlanta Fulton-County Stadium, where the Braves played for 31 seasons after moving from Milwaukee in 1966.

The stadium was imploded after Turner Field became the Braves’ new home in 1997, but a small section of fencing, a wall and a sign mark the spot where No. 715 broke Babe Ruth’s hallowed home run record in 1974. Aaron finished his career with 755 homers, a standard that has since been eclipsed by Barry Bonds.

The Hammer spent nearly all of his 23-year career with the Braves, whose nickname has drawn some criticism as being offensive to Native Americans.

Social media buzzed with calls to change the moniker to match Aaron’s nickname. There was even a fledgling online petition backing the idea.

“The renaming serves two important purposes: 1) It honors an icon who represented our city with grace and dignity for more than half a century, and 2) It removes the stain on the city of having a team name that dishonors Native and Indigenous people, especially given one of the greatest tragedies in American History, the Trail of Tears, began in the region the team calls home,” the petition said.

The Braves have steadfastly resisted calls to change their name, saying they view it as a tribute to Native Americans rather than a slur.

But the team did take steps during the 2019 playoffs to downplay symbols of its nickname after St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Ryan Helsley — a member of the Cherokee Nation — said he found the team’s “Tomahawk Chop” chant offensive.

The team did not distribute red foam tomahawks before the decisive Game 5 of the series, won by the Cardinals, and also halted the playing of rhythmic music that prompts fans to break into the arm-swinging chop.

Braves officials have not said whether those moves will be permanent when fans are allowed to return to games, but it has removed a “Chop On” sign that was near the entrance to Truist Park.

In recent months, some fans began coming up with a possible new logo that replaced the team’s trademark tomahawk with a similar-looking hammer.

There has been no indication that Aaron’s death would change the team’s stance on its Braves nickname. The NL’s oldest franchise began using Braves more than 100 years ago while its played in its original home in Boston.

The team changed its name to the Bees in 1936, a move that lasted until it reverted back to the Braves in 1941.

Last year, the Washington NFL Team dropped its longtime nickname, which Meriam-Webster defined as “insulting and contemptuous.” Baseball’s Cleveland Indians have announced they will change their nickname as well, though not until after the 2021 season.

The Braves are among several big league teams that still use Native American-inspired monikers, including the NFL’s Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, the NBA’s Golden State Warriors and the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks.

Aaron also was honored in Milwaukee, where the Hammer began his big league career and helped lead the Braves to the 1957 World Series title. He returned to the city at the end of his career, playing his final two seasons with the Brewers, and regularly visited over the years for charity events.

The Brewers plan to wear a “44” patch on their jersey sleeves throughout the 2021 season.

“His contributions to the game of baseball and the community of Milwaukee created a legacy that is cherished and will never be forgotten,” Brewers owner Mark Attanasio said.

Bob Uecker, who was Aaron’s teammate in Milwaukee during the 1960s and went on to greater fame as a Hall of Fame broadcaster, remembered his longtime friend.

“I will always cherish my time with Hank, and with (his wife) Billye — all the laughs we shared, and all the unforgettable stories,” Uecker said. ”Hank loved Wisconsin, and we loved him back.”

https://apnews.com/article/nfl-mlb-nba-r...052e487ad4
I get the Redskins but the Indians, what's so offensive about Indians? Aren't the Indians part of our American heritage? Why would someone want to remove them? You're not thinking again.
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#4
(01-28-2021, 04:05 PM)Classic-Xer Wrote:
(01-23-2021, 11:41 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: (Hank) Aaron’s death prompts call to change name: Braves to Hammers

ATLANTA (AP) — As his adopted hometown mourned Hank Aaron’s death, some fans called on the Atlanta Braves to change their name to the Hammers in his honor.

“Hammerin’ Hank” died Friday at age 86, drawing praise from all segments of society — including the current and former presidents — for his Hall of Fame career and providing inspiration to Black Americans by overcoming intense racism in his pursuit of baseball’s home run record.

The governors of both Georgia and Alabama ordered flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of Aaron — the Hammer was born in the port city of Mobile and called Atlanta home for much of his life.


The NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, Major League Soccer’s Atlanta United and Georgia Tech’s football team all announced they would retire Aaron’s trademark No. 44 for their 2021 seasons. The number was long ago retired by the Braves.

“May generations of Georgians continue to be inspired by his groundbreaking career and tremendous impact on our state and nation,” Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp said.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey added, “He inspired many young boys and girls to pursue their dreams and pursue excellence in whatever they do.”

The Braves opened up Truist Park to fans for the first time since the 2019 season, allowing them to pay socially distanced tribute to Aaron on Friday and Saturday at his statue located in a monument garden on the main stadium concourse.

Other fans paid tribute at a display honoring his 715th homer, which is in a parking lot for the stadium formerly known as Turner Field. The site was the home of Atlanta Fulton-County Stadium, where the Braves played for 31 seasons after moving from Milwaukee in 1966.

The stadium was imploded after Turner Field became the Braves’ new home in 1997, but a small section of fencing, a wall and a sign mark the spot where No. 715 broke Babe Ruth’s hallowed home run record in 1974. Aaron finished his career with 755 homers, a standard that has since been eclipsed by Barry Bonds.

The Hammer spent nearly all of his 23-year career with the Braves, whose nickname has drawn some criticism as being offensive to Native Americans.

Social media buzzed with calls to change the moniker to match Aaron’s nickname. There was even a fledgling online petition backing the idea.

“The renaming serves two important purposes: 1) It honors an icon who represented our city with grace and dignity for more than half a century, and 2) It removes the stain on the city of having a team name that dishonors Native and Indigenous people, especially given one of the greatest tragedies in American History, the Trail of Tears, began in the region the team calls home,” the petition said.

The Braves have steadfastly resisted calls to change their name, saying they view it as a tribute to Native Americans rather than a slur.

But the team did take steps during the 2019 playoffs to downplay symbols of its nickname after St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Ryan Helsley — a member of the Cherokee Nation — said he found the team’s “Tomahawk Chop” chant offensive.

The team did not distribute red foam tomahawks before the decisive Game 5 of the series, won by the Cardinals, and also halted the playing of rhythmic music that prompts fans to break into the arm-swinging chop.

Braves officials have not said whether those moves will be permanent when fans are allowed to return to games, but it has removed a “Chop On” sign that was near the entrance to Truist Park.

In recent months, some fans began coming up with a possible new logo that replaced the team’s trademark tomahawk with a similar-looking hammer.

There has been no indication that Aaron’s death would change the team’s stance on its Braves nickname. The NL’s oldest franchise began using Braves more than 100 years ago while its played in its original home in Boston.

The team changed its name to the Bees in 1936, a move that lasted until it reverted back to the Braves in 1941.

Last year, the Washington NFL Team dropped its longtime nickname, which Meriam-Webster defined as “insulting and contemptuous.” Baseball’s Cleveland Indians have announced they will change their nickname as well, though not until after the 2021 season.

The Braves are among several big league teams that still use Native American-inspired monikers, including the NFL’s Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, the NBA’s Golden State Warriors and the NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks.

Aaron also was honored in Milwaukee, where the Hammer began his big league career and helped lead the Braves to the 1957 World Series title. He returned to the city at the end of his career, playing his final two seasons with the Brewers, and regularly visited over the years for charity events.

The Brewers plan to wear a “44” patch on their jersey sleeves throughout the 2021 season.

“His contributions to the game of baseball and the community of Milwaukee created a legacy that is cherished and will never be forgotten,” Brewers owner Mark Attanasio said.

Bob Uecker, who was Aaron’s teammate in Milwaukee during the 1960s and went on to greater fame as a Hall of Fame broadcaster, remembered his longtime friend.

“I will always cherish my time with Hank, and with (his wife) Billye — all the laughs we shared, and all the unforgettable stories,” Uecker said. ”Hank loved Wisconsin, and we loved him back.”

https://apnews.com/article/nfl-mlb-nba-r...052e487ad4
I get the Redskins but the Indians, what's so offensive about Indians? Aren't the Indians part of our American heritage? Why would someone want to remove them? You're not thinking again.

You are right. I am not thinking; I have simply cut and pasted an AP news wire.

Now how about some of my thought:

1. The images that the Cleveland Indians, Washington Redskins, and Atlanta Braves have had... have been unflattering stereotypes. "American Indian" is a category encompassing a wide variety of peoples as disparate as some who are heavily assimilated (the Cherokee would be a prime example) to those who have assimilated little into the America mainstream. The "Indian" image is often a Hollywood stereotype. The one involving the Boston Braves (they were the Boston Braves before they became in turn the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves) may ironically be an allusion to the patriots who raided the ships of the British East Asia company to dispose of the questionably-taxed tea at the original Tea Party. (An aside: they left the liquor alone because there was no offense involving the rum and other hard drink). The patriots dressed up like Indians who by then rarely appeared in Boston. It was a fitting disguise. 

2. The renaming of the Atlanta Braves to the Atlanta Hammers is an allusion to the greatest player in the history of the team, Hank Aaron, often known as "Hammerin' Hank". I consider it fitting if the earlier name, Braves, should be unsupportable. 

3.  American Indians (or as the Canadians would say, "First Peoples", which I somehow prefer) on the whole do badly in economic and social measures. They are far poorer than any other group of people, including even blacks -- even if one takes out the 'biracial' category that is typically about as well off as its white parents, natural or adoptive. 

4. Would you like to see a major-league baseball team called the "Hicks", "Hillbillies", "Rednecks", or "Peckerwoods"?  Somehow I can get away with those words as I cannot get away with for derogatory words about Asians, blacks, or Hispanics. I could imagine a team called the "Roswell Aliens"... but if people want to exploit the local lore about flying saucers, that's fine. Latinos of sketchy right to be here? No.

...maybe it would be easier for you if I did not think. Tough! I can no more give up thinking than the family cat can give up its tendency to kill mice.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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