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Authoritarianism and American politics
#61
(04-12-2018, 06:56 PM)Mikebert Wrote: Looks like Kinser has left.

Few remain.  I'm on and off myself, and you seem to be as well.  The lively discussion that used to exist on the old site is a faint memory.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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#62
I began to run out of things to say well before the close of the old TFT site. Lately, I've noticed that I have started to run out of things to say to other, unrelated forums.
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#63
Guess what? Authoritarians love President Trump. Anti-authoritarians loathe him. 

The Contract With Authoritarianism

[Image: thomas-b-edsall-thumbLarge-v2.png]
By Thomas B. Edsall
Mr. Edsall contributes a weekly column from Washington, D.C. on politics, demographics and inequality.

from the New York Times

[Image: merlin_111734600_04d4b97b-74b5-4fe9-b00f...&auto=webp]


In 1994, Newt Gingrich, brandishing his Contract with America, led a Republican revolution that swept aside Democratic majorities in the House and the Senate, initiating an epoch of conservative ascendancy that lingers on. Don Sipple, a Republican campaign consultant, declared at the time that the 1994 midterms pitted a Republican Party calling for “discipline” against a Democratic Party focused on “therapy.”

Two years later, George Lakoff, a professor of linguistics at Berkeley, published “Moral Politics: How Liberals and Conservatives Think,” which argued that

Quote:Deeply embedded in conservative and liberal politics are two different models of the family. Conservatism is based on a Strict Father model, while liberalism is centered on a Nurturant Parent model. These two models of the family give rise to different moral systems.

Several approaches to contemporary politics echo the insights of Sipple and Lakoff. The crucial word now, however, is authoritarianism.

The election of Donald Trump — built as it was on several long-term trends that converged in 2016 — has created an authoritarian moment. This somewhat surprising development is the subject of “Remaking Partisan Politics through Authoritarian Sorting,” a forthcoming book by the political scientists Christopher Federico, Stanley Feldman and Christopher Weber, who argue that

Quote:Three trends — polarization, media change, and the rise of what many people see as threats to the traditional social order — have contributed to a growing divide within American politics. It is a divide between those who place heavy value on social order and cohesion relative to those who value personal autonomy and independence.

The three authors use a long-established authoritarian scale — based on four survey questions about which childhood traits parents would like to see in their offspring — that asks voters to choose between independence or respect for their elders; curiosity or good manners; self-reliance or obedience; and being considerate or well-behaved. Those respondents who choose respect for elders, good manners, obedience and being well-behaved are rated more authoritarian.

The authors found that in 1992, 62 percent of white voters who ranked highest on the authoritarian scale supported George H.W. Bush. In 2016, 86 percent of the most authoritarian white voters backed Trump, an increase of 24 percentage points.

my comment: Ouch!
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#64
(04-19-2018, 11:38 AM)David Horn Wrote:
(04-12-2018, 06:56 PM)Mikebert Wrote: Looks like Kinser has left.

Few remain.  I'm on and off myself, and you seem to be as well.  The lively discussion that used to exist on the old site is a faint memory.

I rarely reply to two people in the same post but here I think it necessary.  The old forum had decades of content and was connected to the authors as well as high google traffic.  This forum lacks those features.  Furthermore many of those here from the old forum have grown tired debating the same topics with the same people with the same results.

I for one am enjoying the regenracy.  It is nice to actually be able to struggle to find people to work at a coffee shop because we are approaching full employment.  But again that points to my correct analysis that Trump was indeed the GC, reguardless of his questionable choices in hair dye and bronzer.

Meh I suppose Boomers just gotta do their Boomerishness ©.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#65
(05-08-2018, 02:38 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: <snip> a bunch of bullshit </snip>

I find it hilarious that PBR uses an Answer Coalition protest outside of one o Daddy's buildings in his screed. I wonder if he even knows what the Answer Coalition is, or the fact that that they are a front group for the Avakianite faction of the Communists. As someone who was a Marxist-Leninist for over two decades I can assure you that the RCP is authoritarian, like are all other Communist Parties.

Of course then again he also still reads the New York Times. I've yet to find a use for it beyond it being more absorbent than Scotts tissue. But then again the same could have been said of Pravda back in the day before it became the Russian equivalent of the National Enquirer.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
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#66
This editorial cartoon got a cartoonist fired. [Image: 25d78819740189362b662471afdccd1a72182205...=800&h=452]

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette fires editorial cartoonist critical of President Trump

An award-winning editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette whose sketches have been critical of President Donald Trump was fired Thursday.

Rob Rogers, a Pulitzer Prize finalist who had been with the daily newspaper in Pittsburgh for 25 years, announced his own firing via Twitter. He tweeted, "Sad to report this update: Today, after 25 years as the editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, I was fired."

In a statement emailed to ABC News on Friday, Rogers said he is "troubled" by management's decision and how the newspaper's leadership has "veered away from core journalistic values" in recent months.

"I am incredibly proud of the 34 years I have spent drawing editorial cartoons in Pittsburgh -- 25 of them at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. I felt I was a valued and respected member of a quality newspaper staff. This situation changed dramatically and abruptly in recent months," Rogers said in the statement.

"The Post-Gazette’s leadership has veered away from core journalistic values that embrace diverse opinions and public discourse on important issues. I am especially troubled that management’s decision to fire me discounts the thousands of readers who turn to the Post-Gazette for editorials, columns, and cartoons that, while not always reflecting their own positions, challenge preconceived notions and invite thought, conversation, and keep the civic conversation going. I fear that today’s unjustified firing of a dissenting voice on the editorial pages will only serve to diminish an opinion section that was once one of America’s best."

"I love what I do and will continue to find ways to do it and get it out there. The world needs satire now more than ever," Rogers added.
Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto issued a statement about Rogers' termination, saying it is "disappointing" and "sets a low standard."
"The move today by the leadership of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette to fire Rob Rogers after he drew a series of cartoons critical of President Trump is disappointing, and sends the wrong message about press freedoms in a time when they are under siege," Peduto, a Democrat, said in the statement Thursday. "This is precisely the time when the constitutionally-protected free press –- including critics like Rob Rogers -– should be celebrated and supported, and not fired for doing their jobs. This decision, just one day after the President of the United States said the news media is 'Our Country's biggest enemy,' sets a low standard in the 232-year history of the newspaper."
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published its own article on Rogers' firing that included a statement from the newspaper's chief human resources officer, Stephen Spolar.

"The Post-Gazette does not provide details about employment matters, but in light of Mr. Rogers’ public comments today, we do want to acknowledge his long service to the newspaper and our community. Any further discussions will be conducted with Mr. Rogers as a private matter," Spolar said in the statement.

Spolar did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Friday.

The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette also reported that its editorial director, Keith Burris, had nixed a number of Rogers' cartoons in recent weeks, including some depicting Trump.

In an interview with one of the newspaper's reporters, Burris said he didn't "suppress" Rogers' sketches but was trying to address the "tone and frequency" of his cartoons about the president.

"I asked for broader topics and could they be funnier?" Burris told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
Burris did not immediately respond to ABC News' request for comment Friday.

Earlier this month, Rogers posted a series of tweets explaining that he would be taking some vacation days until "issues" between him and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette were resolved.

"I love what I do. Now, more than ever, I believe in the power of satire and the public dialogue that it can create," he tweeted on June 6. "I can't get into specifics here, but I felt that it was best under the circumstances to take some vacation days until issues with the Post-Gazette are resolved."

[Image: Dfla5ZoXkAERmqC.jpg]

More here at ABC News.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#67
Authoritarianism, ethical blindness, and cruelty go together, whether on the Left (Stalin, Mao), Right (Hitler, Pinochet), or ambiguous (Idi Amurderin', Satan Hussein).
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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