Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
What are your specialities?
#1
Hi all! I've re-registered recently, and currently I'm almost ready to publish something new: an explanation to the Four Turnings from a new viewpoint, backed up by sources. But while waiting, I would like to ask everyone here what is your education and/or skill level in history, biology and psychology? This is just to get a better understanding what kind of people are here on this forum, probably a lot of history buffs.  Smile

My education is in the field of law and photography, but for the past year or so I've studied biology on my own, because after 12th grade there hasn't been a need for that (until now).
Reply
#2
I have a bachelor degree in Multimedia design and I also studied a bit of animation and film production before my mental health got in the way of that. I suffer CPTSD. History and psychology for me is just a major interest of mine.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#3
(09-02-2019, 08:36 AM)Ldr Wrote: Hi all! I've re-registered recently, and currently I'm almost ready to publish something new: an explanation to the Four Turnings from a new viewpoint, backed up by sources. But while waiting, I would like to ask everyone here what is your education and/or skill level in history, biology and psychology? This is just to get a better understanding what kind of people are here on this forum, probably a lot of history buffs.  Smile

My education is in the field of law and photography, but for the past year or so I've studied biology on my own, because after 12th grade there hasn't been a need for that (until now).

Welcome Ldr. I look forward to seeing your ideas.

I have studied history extensively as background and documentation for my prophetic theories based on astrology and visionary esoteric philosophy. These subjects are also the true basis for psychological understanding.

http://philosopherswheel.com/book.htm
http://philosopherswheel.com/hna.html

The most important aspect of biology today is in ecology, which provides the evidence for climate change and the need for action. I have developed quite a knowledge of that subject in the course of my debates and desire for more information on the needed action.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#4
Taramarie, nice to hear you have an interest in psychology too. My theory isn't relying on psychology as much as biology, but on a broader scale, psychology obviously affects everything in it.

Eric, it's good to hear that you've studied history extensively. Astrology is something I'm not a believer in, and I think that the path to understanding psychology is in biology + environment. This is how my theory explains how the Strauss & Howe generational theory is apparently entirely based on biology, although it manifests in psychological differences across generations.

Here is the link: http://generational-theory.com/forum/thread-5677.html
Reply
#5
(09-03-2019, 05:43 AM)Ldr Wrote: Taramarie, nice to hear you have an interest in psychology too. My theory isn't relying on psychology as much as biology, but on a broader scale, psychology obviously affects everything in it.

Eric, it's good to hear that you've studied history extensively. Astrology is something I'm not a believer in, and I think that the path to understanding psychology is in biology + environment. This is how my theory explains how the Strauss & Howe generational theory is apparently entirely based on biology, although it manifests in psychological differences across generations.

Here is the link: http://generational-theory.com/forum/thread-5677.html

My main interest right now in psychology is MBTI theory but also in certain psychological conditions that affect me and those around me as well as in wider scale patterns of behaviour through history.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#6
Good to hear that you're researching your own states of mind, I imagine it can have a calming and positive effect. Smile Since I've connected hormone levels to the Strauss & Howe generational theory, I've been looking what effects the cyclical hormone levels have from social mood to individual decisions. Hormones affect every single part of our lives, which is why I recommend reading my theory, as it may open new ideas for you.

One quick related idea is that since low oxytocin levels imply an anti-social generation, that being Gen X during this cycle, it could possibly mean that Gen X, especially the ones born in 1965-1975, are generally more introvert than millennials. I have situated a quick rise in oxytocin levels from 1972 to 1980 in the cycle.
Reply
#7
(09-03-2019, 11:39 AM)Ldr Wrote: Good to hear that you're researching your own states of mind, I imagine it can have a calming and positive effect. Smile Since I've connected hormone levels to the Strauss & Howe generational theory, I've been looking what effects the cyclical hormone levels have from social mood to individual decisions. Hormones affect every single part of our lives, which is why I recommend reading my theory, as it may open new ideas for you.

One quick related idea is that since low oxytocin levels imply an anti-social generation, that being Gen X during this cycle, it could possibly mean that Gen X, especially the ones born in 1965-1975, are generally more introvert than millennials. I have situated a quick rise in oxytocin levels from 1972 to 1980 in the cycle.

Calming and positive effect? Not really, but it does help me to understand myself and those around me a lot more. Well personally I am not majorly interested in hormone cycles. I am a millennial and very much an introvert myself. Being an introvert does not make one anti social. Think of the real world being the inner world, and for extroverts, the outer world being the real world. For introverts, they need to introvert to find the truth and the extroverts find the truth from the outside world. It all takes up energy, and too much information needs to be processed which can be quite draining for introverts and extroverts in different ways. So eventually the extrovert would need to have some external stimuli, and the introvert would need to have some time for themselves to fully process everything. Introverts can be quite social and extroverts can be shy. As an introvert myself, I'm definitely not anti social, but I am a shy isfp introvert.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#8


1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#9
Well, my theory is about these themes also. We millennials have higher levels of oxytocin, which could mean that we feel lonely easier when compared to Gen X. Hormone levels affect our reactivity to everything around us and inside us. This is why hormones are paramount to how one acts, reacts and thinks.
Reply
#10
(09-05-2019, 04:14 AM)Ldr Wrote: Well, my theory is about these themes also. We millennials have higher levels of oxytocin, which could mean that we feel lonely easier when compared to Gen X. Hormone levels affect our reactivity to everything around us and inside us. This is why hormones are paramount to how one acts, reacts and thinks.

I don't believe in that, but rather how we have been raised as a whole and individually as well as our individual personalities and finding our place in history that is needed at the time. I don't believe we have higher levels of oxytocin. That is just my way of thinking.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#11
I'm a hobbyist when it comes to history and sociology. I like to think I'm knowledgeable but I'm at the stage in my studies of realizing how much I *don't* know.

Professionally I am a software engineer and have a bachelor's degree in Computer Science. I work at a bank. You could say I have a cushy Fin Tech job. Or that I am a corporate drone.
Steve Barrera

[A]lthough one would like to change today's world back to the spirit of one hundred years or more ago, it cannot be done. Thus it is important to make the best out of every generation. - Hagakure

Saecular Pages
Reply
#12
BA in economics, but I can learn anything not extremely technical or esoteric. Oddly I understand astrophysics far better than astrology... because astrophysics is comparatively easy. I am thoroughly up-to-date on the technology -- of the 1980's. I guess I am an amateur historian and journalist...

I see myself very good at tripping up poseurs. I know the pontes asinorum that can expose people who claim technical expertise that they do not have.. and that is usually mathematics of some kind, typically calculus.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#13
(09-05-2019, 04:27 AM)taramarie Wrote:
(09-05-2019, 04:14 AM)Ldr Wrote: Well, my theory is about these themes also. We millennials have higher levels of oxytocin, which could mean that we feel lonely easier when compared to Gen X. Hormone levels affect our reactivity to everything around us and inside us. This is why hormones are paramount to how one acts, reacts and thinks.

I don't believe in that, but rather how we have been raised as a whole and individually as well as our individual personalities and finding our place in history that is needed at the time. I don't believe we have higher levels of oxytocin. That is just my way of thinking.

Well, the statistics do implicate that millennials and Gen Z - and all other 3rd and 4th generations - have higher levels of oxytocin (on average). There is clear evidence from the 1) breastfeeding initiation, 2) maternal age, and 3) time spent with children, as they all have a low point in 1972-75. And the alcohol consumption always drops at the same time in the cycle, and higher levels of oxytocin decreases drinking in humans and even the cravings to drink. High hormone levels of oxytocin also promote cooperative behavior and communication, so that fits the 3rd generation profile, and the millennials are indeed very cooperative.

Low hormone levels of oxytocin promote isolation and alcohol abuse, and that would be Boomers and Gen X (until birth year 1975).

Oxytocin and vasopressin fit the Strauss & Howe generational theory with great accuracy. And the theory also explains why the changes during an individuals life cycle are different for each generation. This is because the societal hormone levels change from turning to turning. So the societal hormone levels cycle, but of course the one's received at birth are the most important, as most of an individual's opinions and preferences are cemented at ages 15 to 25, after which they may be altered, but in decreasing amounts as he/she gets older.

Vasopressin is what drives group aggression towards an out-group. And during a 4th turning, vasopressin levels spike up, and they reach their highert point somewhere close to the ending of a 4th turning. (These are obvious only approximations, and situations always vary by century and nations involved.) An out-group in 2019 can be the democrats if you're an republican, or vice versa, or the English government in the 1770's. It does not matter who "they" are, but as vasopressin levels go higher, "they" may become an target of group violence. I believe this is the reason why 4th turnings are times of turmoil.

The theory also explains why there is a severe emotional/spiritual void as the 1st turning ends. As oxytocin and vasopressin are simultaneously low, there is a need to fill that emotional void with something new. This is why substance use increases during the 2nd and beginning of the 3rd turning, until there is a rise in oxytocin levels again, which decreases substance use.


[Image: oxytocin-vasopressin-generational-levels-2.png]


Looking at several centuries and including the main 4th turning conflicts (American Revolutionary War, American Civil War, WW2) involving the US, the cyclic pattern now looks like this:

[Image: oxytocin-vasopressin-generational-levels-2-long.png]
Reply
#14
(09-06-2019, 12:50 AM)Ldr Wrote:
(09-05-2019, 04:27 AM)taramarie Wrote:
(09-05-2019, 04:14 AM)Ldr Wrote: Well, my theory is about these themes also. We millennials have higher levels of oxytocin, which could mean that we feel lonely easier when compared to Gen X. Hormone levels affect our reactivity to everything around us and inside us. This is why hormones are paramount to how one acts, reacts and thinks.

I don't believe in that, but rather how we have been raised as a whole and individually as well as our individual personalities and finding our place in history that is needed at the time. I don't believe we have higher levels of oxytocin. That is just my way of thinking.

Well, the statistics do implicate that millennials and Gen Z - and all other 3rd and 4th generations - have higher levels of oxytocin (on average). There is clear evidence from the 1) breastfeeding initiation, 2) maternal age, and 3) time spent with children, as they all have a low point in 1972-75. And the alcohol consumption always drops at the same time in the cycle, and higher levels of oxytocin decreases drinking in humans and even the cravings to drink. High hormone levels of oxytocin also promote cooperative behavior and communication, so that fits the 3rd generation profile, and the millennials are indeed very cooperative.

Low hormone levels of oxytocin promote isolation and alcohol abuse, and that would be Boomers and Gen X (until birth year 1975).

Oxytocin and vasopressin fit the Strauss & Howe generational theory with great accuracy. And the theory also explains why the changes during an individuals life cycle are different for each generation. This is because the societal hormone levels change from turning to turning. So the societal hormone levels cycle, but of course the one's received at birth are the most important, as most of an individual's opinions and preferences are cemented at ages 15 to 25, after which they may be altered, but in decreasing amounts as he/she gets older.

Vasopressin is what drives group aggression towards an out-group. And during a 4th turning, vasopressin levels spike up, and they reach their highert point somewhere close to the ending of a 4th turning. (These are obvious only approximations, and situations always vary by century and nations involved.) An out-group in 2019 can be the democrats if you're an republican, or vice versa, or the English government in the 1770's. It does not matter who "they" are, but as vasopressin levels go higher, "they" may become an target of group violence. I believe this is the reason why 4th turnings are times of turmoil.

The theory also explains why there is a severe emotional/spiritual void as the 1st turning ends. As oxytocin and vasopressin are simultaneously low, there is a need to fill that emotional void with something new. This is why substance use increases during the 2nd and beginning of the 3rd turning, until there is a rise in oxytocin levels again, which decreases substance use.


[Image: oxytocin-vasopressin-generational-levels-2.png]


Looking at several centuries and including the main 4th turning conflicts (American Revolutionary War, American Civil War, WW2) involving the US, the cyclic pattern now looks like this:

[Image: oxytocin-vasopressin-generational-levels-2-long.png]
As stated I just don't believe that at all and it is my right to disregard that. I follow other theories that sound far more valid to me.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#15
Could the cycle be that simple -- hormones in their own cycle?
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#16
(09-06-2019, 07:08 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Could the cycle be that simple -- hormones in their own cycle?

No far more complex things going on of course. But then again I totally don't believe in this theory anyway.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#17
The menstrual cycle is controlled by hormones, and that cycle can change the mood. The generational cycle is just longer. It's not really that different from that, as there is evidence that menstrual cycles can sync, especially with other mammals that humans, with humans the evidence is scarcer.

It really does seem that the mammal cycles are the same, voles, lemmings, hares, etc. They all seem to have a generational hormone cycle. What is different with humans is that some get to see the whole 80 year cycle, but I have not yet found an animal that could reach the same achievement
Reply
#18
And where do you get your statistics from? How do we know which hormone levels people in colonial America had?
Reply
#19
All current sources are on the theory's webpage.

As for colonial America, there obviously are almost no statistics available from US from that period, but there are some statistics from the medieval England, like the one below. Red lines mark a fourth turnings ending. It seems that they align nicely with the sociopolitical instabilities in England, starting from the Anarchy during the 1150's. Every single bigger period of instability, three out of three, correlates with the generational theory.

[Image: england-sociopolitical-instability-cycle.jpg]

When going back centuries, after the 19th century the theory mostly relies on the observations done by Strauss & Howe on parenting, alcohol use, etc. The idea is to use all the data available from 1800 to 2019 to connect the historical observations to cyclical hormone levels.

If this sounds difficult, it is, but so far almost everything has aligned pretty nicely with the hormone theory.
Reply
#20
(09-06-2019, 08:04 AM)taramarie Wrote:
(09-06-2019, 07:08 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Could the cycle be that simple -- hormones in their own cycle?

No far more complex things going on of course. But then again I totally don't believe in this theory anyway.

Or could it be that the hormone cycle is a consequence of position in the saeculum? Could it be a feedback mechanism?

Typically every stage of the saeculum has at least three generations of adults with influence from workers starting families to geezers wielding the last vestiges of power and influence in society. 

Sometimes we confuse cause and effect.

Early motherhood is a norm when bread-winning husbands are paid well and non-working wives are common... and teenage marriage becomes economically viable due to a commonness of good pay for unskilled labor. But get hard times and people defer marriage and childbearing, because hardship the economic norm and women must go to work to ensure that two low incomes can be equivalent to one solid income. Low breast-feeding rates may relate to the "scientific" (really, commercial) advocacy of using cow's milk or baby formulas instead of relying upon breast milk. Alcohol and drug consumption fall off as they become old-hat and more infamous for ruin than delightful for fun. (Drug overdoses and people dying of binge drinking in their thirties make an effective warning to find fun and enlightenment by other means). In a 3T, people still rely upon hedonism because they are so spiritually-dead or spiritually-nuked that there is nothing else. When hedonism fails -- about when an economic bubble bursts (1857, 1929, 2008) -- then comes the time of the locust, the 4T.

Above all, populist nationalism appears when "stay-the-course" classical liberals have created extreme economic failure by telling people to go ahead and invest in bubbles that ultimately devour capital and quit giving a rate of return on capital. Or as Will Rogers put it during the early stages of the Great Depression: people were concerned about the rate of return on their capital when they instead should have been concerned about the return of their capital. Populist nationalism often results in scapegoating of what had recently been model minorities (like the definitive model minority, German Jews under Antichrist Hitler). The "model minorities" get the blame for what a bubble did even if the model minorities had nothing special to do with it.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)