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Obituaries
Penny Marshall, 75, best known as "Laverne" of "Laverne and Shirley".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_Marshall
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Peter Masterson (June 1, 1934 - December 19, 2018) was an American actor, director, producer and writer.


Masterson often worked with his cousin, writer Horton Foote. Acting from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, including 1975's The Stepford Wives as Walter Eberhart, since then he has concentrated mostly on directing and producing. The actress Mary Stuart Masterson is his daughter and she appeared with her father in The Stepford Wives as one of the Eberharts' daughters.
His other acting credits include roles in Ambush Bay (1966), In the Heat of the Night (1967), Counterpoint (1968), Von Richthofen and Brown (1971), Tomorrow (1972), The Exorcist (1973), Man on a Swing (1974) and Gardens of Stone (1987).

Masterson co-wrote (with Larry L. King) the books for the hit musical The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1978)[1] and its short-lived sequel The Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public (1994).[2] In 1985 he directed The Trip to Bountiful, for which Geraldine Page won the Academy Award for Best Actress. His directing credits additionally include Full Moon in Blue Water (1988), Night Game (1989), Blood Red (1989), Convicts (1991), Arctic Blue (1993), The Only Thrill (1997), Lost Junction (2003) and Whiskey School (2005).

Masterson died on December 19, 2018 after suffering a fall at his home. He was 84.[3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Masterson
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-46662546
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paddy_Ashdown

A British liberal, long-term leader of the Liberal Democratic Party (former Whigs).

He was praised for many quintessential Silent qualities: ability to cooperate and compromise, moderation and expertise.
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Mathematician. I don't fully understand what is discussed, but it sounds important. Mathematics is the language of reality.

Elias Menachem Stein (January 13, 1931 – December 23, 2018) was an American mathematician, and a leading figure in the field of harmonic analysis. He was professor of Mathematics at Princeton University from 1963 until his death in 2018.


Stein was born in Antwerp, to Elkan Stein and Chana Goldman, Ashkenazi Jews from Belgium.[1] After the German invasion in 1940, the Stein family fled to the United States, first arriving in New York City.[1] He graduated from Stuyvesant High School in 1949,[1] where he was classmates with future Fields Medalist Paul Cohen,[2] before moving on to the University of Chicago for college. In 1955, Stein earned a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago under the direction of Antoni Zygmund. He began teaching in MIT in 1955, moved to the University of Chicago in 1958 as an assistant professor, and in 1963 became a full professor at Princeton.

Stein worked primarily in the field of harmonic analysis, and made contributions in both extending and clarifying Calderón–Zygmund theory. These include Stein interpolation (a variable-parameter version of complex interpolation), the Stein maximal principle (showing that under many circumstances, almost everywhere convergence is equivalent to the boundedness of a maximal function), Stein complementary series representations, Nikishin–Pisier–Stein factorization in operator theory, the Tomas–Stein restriction theorem in Fourier analysis, the Kunze–Stein phenomenon in convolution on semisimple groups, the Cotlar–Stein lemma concerning the sum of almost orthogonal operators, and the Fefferman–Stein theory of the Hardy space H 1 {\displaystyle H^{1}} [Image: 246d198ccb2f5e5488a7afd13093aab7b005139b] and the space B M O {\displaystyle BMO} [Image: 97f5ef9c87d15fee3be8f4660e55445466b63259] of functions of bounded mean oscillation.

He has written numerous books on harmonic analysis (see e.g. [1,3,5]), which are often cited as the standard references on the subject. His Princeton Lectures in Analysis series [6,7,8,9] were penned for his sequence of undergraduate courses on analysis at Princeton. Stein is also noted as having trained a high number of graduate students (he has had at least 52 students, according to the Mathematics Genealogy Project), so shaping modern Fourier analysis. They include two Fields medalists, Charles Fefferman and Terence Tao.
His honors include the Steele Prize (1984 and 2002), the Schock Prize in Mathematics (1993), the Wolf Prize in Mathematics (1999), and the National Medal of Science (2001). In addition, he has fellowships to National Science Foundation, Sloan Foundation, Guggenheim Foundation, and National Academy of Sciences. In 2005, Stein was awarded the Stefan Bergman prize in recognition of his contributions in real, complex, and harmonic analysis. In 2012 he became a fellow of the American Mathematical Society.[3]

In 1959, he married Elly Intrator,[1] a former Jewish refugee during World War II.[4] They had two children, Karen Stein and Jeremy C. Stein,[1] and grandchildren named Alison, Jason, and Carolyn. His son Jeremy is a professor of financial economics at Harvard, former adviser to Tim Geithner and Lawrence Summers, and was appointed to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors by President Barack Obama in 2011.

 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elias_M._Stein

The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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An interesting, diverse trio of people who might otherwise be missed:

Wendy Beckett (25 February 1930 – 26 December 2018), better known as Sister Wendy, was a British religious sister,[1] hermit, consecrated virgin, and art historian[2] who became well known internationally during the 1990s when she presented a series of documentaries for the BBC on the history of art.[3] Her programmes, such as Sister Wendy's Odyssey and Sister Wendy's Grand Tour, often drew a 25 percent share of the British viewing audience.[4] In 1997, Sister Wendy made her US debut on public television and that same year The New York Times described her as "a sometime hermit who is fast on her way to becoming the most unlikely and famous art critic in the history of television."[1]

 More at Wikipedia


Roy Jay Glauber (September 1, 1925 – December 26, 2018) was an American theoretical physicist. He was the Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics at Harvard University and Adjunct Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. Born in New York City, he was awarded one half of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his contribution to the quantum theory of optical coherence", with the other half shared by John L. Hall and Theodor W. Hänsch. In this work, published in 1963, he created a model for photodetection and explained the fundamental characteristics of different types of light, such as laser light (see coherent state) and light from light bulbs (see blackbody). His theories are widely used in the field of quantum optics.[5][6][7][8] In statistical physics he pioneered the study of the dynamics of first-order phase transitions, since he first defined and investigated the stochastic dynamics of a Ising model in a largely influential paper published in 1963.[9] He served on the National Advisory Board[10] of the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, the research arms of Council for a Livable World.

One never knows the consequences of science. Quantum optics? I don't understand it, but it might be profoundly useful.  Link to Wikipedia.


Sono Osato (August 29, 1919 – December 26, 2018) was an American dancer and actress of Japanese and European descent.[1] She was notable for performing with ballet groups Ballets Russe de Monte-Carlo and the American Ballet Theatre. An actress, she starred alongside Frank Sinatra in the film The Kissing Bandit

Osato began her career at the age of fourteen with Wassily de Basil's Ballets Russe de Monte-Carlo, which at the time was the world's most well known ballet company; she was the youngest member of the troupe, their first American dancer and their first dancer of Japanese descent.[1][5] De Basil tried to persuade Osato to change her name to a Russian name, but she refused to do so.[3] She spent six years touring the United States, Europe, Australia and South America with the company, leaving in 1941 as she felt her career was stagnating. She went to study at the School of American Ballet in New York City for six months, then joined the American Ballet Theatre (then Ballet Theatre) as a dancer.[1][3] While at the ABT, she danced roles in such ballets as Kenneth MacMillan's Sleeping Beauty, Antony Tudor's Pillar of Fire, and Bronislava Nijinska's The Beloved.[6][7]
 
[Image: 180px-Sono_Osato_in_Francesca_da_Rimini_...084%29.jpg]
Osato in Francesca da Rimini costume, 1930s

As a musical theater performer, her Broadway credits included principal dancer in One Touch of Venus (a performance for which she received a Donaldson Award in 1943), Ivy Smith in the original On the Town, and Cocaine Lil in Ballet Ballads.[8][9]
Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Osato was encouraged to change her name to something more "American", and for a short time she used her mother's maiden name and performed as Sono Fitzpatrick.[10] At around the same time, her father was arrested and detained in Chicago under the United States government's Japanese American Internment policy.[3][11] In 1942, when the Ballet Theatre toured Mexico, Osato was unable to join the tour as Japanese Americans were barred from leaving the country, and she had several months without work. She was also unable to perform in California and other parts of the western United States when the company toured there later in the same year, as these states were deemed military areas and were off-limits for people of Japanese descent.[3]

In the late 1940s and 1950s, Osato briefly pursued a career as an actress, appearing on Broadway in Peer Gynt, in the film The Kissing Bandit with Frank Sinatra, and in occasional guest appearances on television series such as, The Adventures of Ellery Queen (1950).[10][12]

In 1980, Osato published an autobiography titled Distant Dances.[13][14] In 2006, she founded the Sono Osato Scholarship Program in Graduate Studies at Career Transition For Dancers to help former dancers finance graduate work in both the professions and the liberal arts.[15][16] In 2016, Thodos Dance Company in Chicago presented a dance production based on her life, titled Sono's Journey.[5]

More at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Two very different artists, one of animation and one with the cello:

Donald Lusk (October 28, 1913 – December 30, 2018[1]) was an American animator and director.

Don Lusk was hired by The Walt Disney Company in 1933.[2] Some of his more notable work included Pinocchio, Fantasia, Bambi, Song of the South, Cinderella, Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan, Lady and the Tramp, Sleeping Beauty and One Hundred and One Dalmatians.[3][4]
Lusk left Disney in 1960, but continued to work as an animator during the 1960s and 1970s. Aside from animation, Lusk also directed multiple cartoon films and series, most notably for various Peanuts TV specials and movies and for the Hanna-Barbera studio. His work at the latter included Scooby-Doo, The Flintstones, The Jetsons, The Smurfs and Tom and Jerry.[5]
In the early 1990s, Lusk retired after a career that spanned 60 years.[6]

More at Wikipedia

One has to be very good at what one does to work to age 80 or so.

Aldo Simoes Parisot[1] (September 30, 1918 – December 29, 2018) was a Brazilian-born American cellist and cello teacher. He was formerly a member of the Juilliard School faculty, and served as a music professor at the Yale School of Music for sixty years (1958 to July 2018).

Born in Natal, Brazil, Parisot began studying cello at age seven with his stepfather, Tomazzo Babini. From Babini, he learned the importance of playing without unnecessary tension—something he credits as the foundation for the rest of his career.[2] At the age of 12 he gave his professional debut as a cellist.[3] From there, he moved on to become principal cellist of the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra in Rio de Janeiro. During one of the concerts, Carleton Sprague Smith, the attaché to the American embassy was in attendance. Upon witnessing Parisot's performance of Brahms's Double Concerto with violinist Ricardo Odnoposoff, he proceeded to go backstage, and invited Parisot to attend a party thrown for Yehudi Menuhin. At the party, Smith told Parisot he would arrange for Parisot to study at the Curtis Institute of Music with Emanuel Feuermann.[2] However, Feuermann died unexpectedly on May 25, 1942, three months before Parisot's intended arrival in the US.[4]

Sometime later, Smith again approached Parisot, this time with an offer to pursue studies of music theory and chamber music at Yale University on scholarship. Accommodations were to be made such that Parisot could avoid taking lessons, as Feuermann was the only one Parisot was interested in studying with. Parisot accepted, and began at Yale in 1946. Parisot's theory professor at Yale was Paul Hindemith, with whom Parisot became close friends. However, after an argument concerning a missed rehearsal, the two got into a fight—Parisot exclaiming to Hindemith "You and your orchestra can go to hell!". A representative of the student union visited him and warned him that he could be deported. Hindemith and Parisot soon after resolved the misunderstanding.[2]


At age 26, during the start of his studies at Yale, he made his United States debut with the Boston Symphony Orchestra at the festival in Tanglewood. He embarked on his first European tour the following year. Following this he earned a degree from Yale School of Music and toured throughout the United States, Canada, and South America.[5] According to Margaret Campbell, in her book The Great Cellists,[6]

Parisot was a brilliant soloist, chamber musician and teacher who based his ideas on the playing of Emanuel Feuermann.

In the 1950s Parisot appeared in numerous solo concerts and soloed in many concertos with orchestras. During this time, he also premiered works by composers such as Heitor Villa-Lobos, Camargo Guarnieri, Jose Siqueira, Quincy Porter, Mel Powell, Claudio Santoro, Donald Martino as well as other works that where written and dedicated to him.[7] He is recognized for his musicality, temperament and virtuoso playing as well as his teaching abilities.
Parisot gave first performances of composers such as Carmago Guarnieri, Quincy Porter, Alvin Etler, Claudio Santoro, Joan Panetti, Ezra Laderman, Yehudi Wyner, and Heitor Villa-Lobos always trying to enlarge the cello repertoire. Villa-Lobos composed his Cello Concerto No. 2 for Parisot, and dedicated the concerto to him. Parisot gave the first performance at his debut with the New York Philharmonic. Orchestras such as the Amsterdam, Berlin, Chicago, London, Los Angeles, Munich, Paris, Pittsburgh, Rio de Janeiro, Stockholm, Vienna and Warsaw, have played with him with prestigious conductors such as Stokowski, John Barbirolli, Pierre-Michel Le Conte, Leonard Bernstein, Eleazar de Carvalho, Zubin Mehta, Claude Monteux, Paul Paray, Victor de Sabata, Sawallisch, Hindemith, and Heitor Villa-Lobos.[8] In this period, he was also the cellist with the Yale Quartet, with Broadus Erle, Syoko Aki and Walter Trampler.[9]
From 1956 to 1996, Parisot owned the De Munck Stradivarius.[citation needed]
Parisot's performance at Tanglewood of Donald Martino's Parisonatina al'Dodecafonia for solo cello—a piece written for Parisot—received many favorable reviews, including from Harold Schonberg of The New York Times and from the Boston Globe.[2]

Parisot was renowned for his teaching, having held posts at Peabody Conservatory, Mannes College of Music, the Juilliard School, and the New England Conservatory in addition to his current position at Yale, which he has held since 1958. Throughout the years, his students have gone on to careers as prominent concert artists, teachers and players in major symphony orchestras. Some better-known former students of his include Jesús Castro-Balbi, Shauna Rolston, Bion Tsang, Ralph Kirshbaum, Han-na Chang, Robert deMaine, Johann Sebastian Paetsch, Jian Wang.[7] According to Kirshbaum:

Parisot had a virtuoso left hand technique and was a great teacher. He also furthered the use of my musical imagination in a technical sense.[7]

In addition to maintaining a private studio, Parisot conducted the Yale Cellos since 1983. Formed as an ensemble of his current students, the group has since released a number of award-winning CDs, one of which received a Grammy nomination.[10] Parisot formally retired from Yale in July 2018, having been the longest-serving faculty member of the Yale School of Music and also the oldest member of the Yale University faculty.[11]

 
Parisot regularly gave master classes at the Banff Centre from 1980 to 2007, in addition to his regular teaching at the Yale Summer School in Norfolk, and at several other summer festivals. He gave master classes at the Sibelius Academy in November 1991. In Seoul, South Korea Parisot has offered courses of master classes at the Chung-Ang University since May 1994. He also held master classes at the Manchester International Cello Festival, and conducted a large cello ensemble. In January 2000 he toured Taiwan performing with the teaching staff to aid earthquake relief victims.
In 1984, Parisot gave a month's worth of master classes in China, where he auditioned prospective students, and the following year he was invited back. Beginning in 1987, he gave master classes and performances at the Jerusalem Music Center in Israel. He also taught at the Great Mountains Music Festival and School at the Yongpyong resort.
Alan Rich of New York Magazine has commented about these master classes:[3]

Parisot regularly gave master classes at the Banff Centre from 1980 to 2007, in addition to his regular teaching at the Yale Summer School in Norfolk, and at several other summer festivals. He gave master classes at the Sibelius Academy in November 1991. In Seoul, South Korea Parisot has offered courses of master classes at the Chung-Ang University since May 1994. He also held master classes at the Manchester International Cello Festival, and conducted a large cello ensemble. In January 2000 he toured Taiwan performing with the teaching staff to aid earthquake relief victims.
In 1984, Parisot gave a month's worth of master classes in China, where he auditioned prospective students, and the following year he was invited back. Beginning in 1987, he gave master classes and performances at the Jerusalem Music Center in Israel. He also taught at the Great Mountains Music Festival and School at the Yongpyong resort.
Alan Rich of New York Magazine has commented about these master classes:[3]

The master classes are extraordinary – Parisot has that enormous, rare gift of translating musical feeling into solid information about what to do with a set of fingers and a bow. Maybe there are master classes for clarinet, or trombone, somewhere in the world, but I doubt that they operate on the level of intensity that you find at Parisot's classes at Yale…as a teacher, he is an object of pilgrimage.


More at Wikipedia

...on a university faculty until retiring at age 99.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Harpsichordist Blandine Verlet:

Blandine Verlet (27 February 1942 – 30 December 2018)[1][2] was a French harpsichordist and a harpsichord teacher, who is known internationally for her recordings of works by François Couperin.


Born in Paris into a musical family, she was the seventh of ten children, and in 1957 gained admission to the Conservatoire de Paris, studying piano and harpsichord. Having decided on her specialty, she studied harpsichord with Huguette Dreyfus in Paris,[3] Ruggero Gerlin in Siena and with Ralph Kirkpatrick at Yale University.[4] A significant competition prize in Paris in 1963 led to engagements in Italy and Germany.

Verlet was widely praised for her recordings of Bach's music, including the Goldberg Variations.[5] She is perhaps best known for having played the music of her compatriot François Couperin, displaying exceptional sensitivity and imagination. Verlet recorded Couperin's complete works in the 1970s and 80s, and in late 2011 she returned to re-record five 'ordres' on the period Henri Hemsch harpsichord. Verlet wrote a poem in celebration of Couperin which accompanied the release, the closing lines of which exemplify her great imaginative empathy with this key French composer:
Quote:We hope we too have managed to grasp
your art of playing the harpsichord.
The art of both poetry and precision.
The art of whispering, murmuring.
The song without words, lighter for having no text.
Wandering shadows, expressions of the heart.
Our thanks to you, Francois Couperin. (tr. Mary Pardoe)
Verlet died at the age of 76.[6]

 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blandine_Verlet
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Pop music figure Daryl Dragon, best known as the "Captain" of Captain and Tenille.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daryl_Dragon
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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I'm surprised that I have never flown on his airline. Maybe you have (Southwest Airlines):


Herbert David Kelleher (March 12, 1931 – January 3, 2019) was an American businessman. He was the co-founder, CEO, and Chairman Emeritus of Southwest Airlines

The Kellehers moved to Texas intending to start a law firm or a business. Kelleher and one of his law clients, Texas businessman Rollin King, created the concept with banker John Parker that later became Southwest Airlines. An often retold founding myth states that the business plan was written out on a cocktail napkin in a San Antonio restaurant,[8] though Kelleher and King have both stated that there was no literal cocktail napkin.[9][10] Despite not being drawn on a napkin, they originally devised a very simple plan of connecting the Texas Triangle with low-cost air service, patterned largely on California's Pacific Southwest Airlines.[9][8]

After incorporating the company initially as "Air Southwest Co." in 1967, Kelleher and King faced four years of setbacks and legal challenges from competitors that culminated in winning key cases before the Supreme Court of the United States in December 1970 and the Supreme Court of Texas in June 1971.[9][8] The first flights finally took off on June 18, 1971.[10] Reflecting back on that time Kelleher said, "I think my greatest moment in business was when the first Southwest airplane arrived after four years of litigation and I walked up to it and I kissed that baby on the lips and I cried."[11] Kelleher's early involvement in the company was helping the company navigate legal concerns and as an advisor to the operation. Lamar Muse was hired as CEO, but after struggles between Muse and King escalated over the next several years, Muse resigned in 1978. Kelleher was installed as Chairman of the Board in March of that year and the board appointed him as temporary CEO.[9] In 1981 he was appointed the full-time CEO, a position he held for 20 years.[10]

Under Kelleher's leadership, Southwest succeeded by a strategy of offering low fares to its passengers, eliminating unnecessary services, using a single aircraft type (the Boeing 737), avoiding the hub-and-spoke scheduling system used by other airlines in favor of building point-to-point traffic, and focusing on secondary airports such as Chicago-Midway (instead of Chicago-O'Hare) and Orange County.[4] The company he founded and built has consistently been named among the most admired companies in America in Fortune magazine's annual poll.[12] Fortune has also called him perhaps the best CEO in America.[4]
 
Your employees come first. And if you treat your employees right, guess what? Your customers come back, and that makes your shareholders happy. Start with employees and the rest follows from that.
Herb Kelleher[13]
 
Kelleher's colorful personality created a corporate culture which made Southwest employees well known for taking themselves lightly but their jobs seriously.[14] His culture-leadership was well-demonstrated in an arm-wrestling event in March 1992. Shortly after Southwest started using the "Just Plane Smart" motto, Stevens Aviation, who had been using "Plane Smart" for their motto, threatened a trademark lawsuit, which was resolved between Herb Kelleher and Stevens Aviation CEO Kurt Herwald in an arm-wrestling match, now known as "Malice in Dallas".[15][16][8]

In March 2001, Kelleher stepped down as CEO and President of Southwest. He passed the CEO role onto James Parker and the President role to Colleen Barrett, though he remained Chairman of the Board.[6] On July 19, 2007, Southwest Airlines announced that Kelleher would step down from the role of Chairman and resign from the board of directors in May 2008. The retirement of Barrett as President was announced at the same time, though the two would remain full-time employees for another five years.[17] Kelleher ultimately stepped down as chairman on May 21, 2008. Immediately following, Southwest Airlines filled both the Chairman and President positions with then-current CEO, Gary C. Kelly, who had taken over the CEO position from Parker three years earlier.[18] Kelleher was given the title of Chairman Emeritus with an office at Southwest Airlines Headquarters and he remained connected to the company until his death in 2019.[19]

In July 2010 Kelleher was appointed Chair of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas board of directors for 2011.[20] Kelleher's term expired in 2013. Previously, he had served as Deputy Chair.[21][22]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herb_Kelleher
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Harold Brown (September 19, 1927 – January 4, 2019) was an American nuclear physicist who served as U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1977 to 1981, under President Jimmy Carter. Previously, in the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson administrations, he held the posts of Director of Defense Research and Engineering (1961–1965) and Secretary of the Air Force (1965–1969).[1]

A child prodigy, Brown graduated from the Bronx High School of Science at age 15, and earned a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University at age 21.[2] As Secretary of Defense, he set the groundwork for the Camp David Accords, took part in strategic arms negotiations with the Soviet Union and supported, unsuccessfully, ratification of the SALT II treaty.

Brown was born in Brooklyn, New York City, the son of Abraham, a lawyer who had fought in World War I, and Gertrude (Cohen) Brown, a diamond merchant’s bookkeeper.[3] His parents were secular Jews and strong supporters of Franklin D. Roosevelt.[2] From a very young age Brown was drawn to mathematics and physics; he enrolled as a student at the Bronx High School of Science, from which he graduated at age 15 with a grade average of 99.5.[2] He then immediately entered Columbia University, earning an A.B. summa cum laude at 17 years of age, as well as the Green Memorial Prize for the best academic record. He continued as a graduate student at Columbia, and was awarded a Ph.D. in physics in 1949, when he was 21.[2][4]

After a short period of teaching and postdoctoral research, Brown became a research scientist at the Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1952 he joined the staff of the University of California Radiation Laboratory at Livermore and became its director in 1960. At Livermore, Brown led a team of six other physicists (all older than he was) who used some of the first computers, along with mathematics and engineering, to reduce the size of thermonuclear warheads for strategic military use. Brown and his team helped make Livermore’s reputation by designing nuclear warheads small and light enough to be placed on the Navy’s nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs).[2] During the 1950s he served as a member of, or consultant to, several federal scientific bodies and as senior science adviser at the 1958-59 Conference on the Discontinuance of Nuclear Tests.[citation needed]

Brown worked under Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara as Director of Defense Research and Engineering from 1961-65, and then as Secretary of the Air Force from October 1965 to January 1969, first under McNamara and then under Clark Clifford. From 1969-77, he was President of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).[citation needed]

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Marketing maven who changed the way many of us buy stuff,


Lester Wunderman (June 22, 1920 – January 9, 2019) was an advertising executive widely considered the creator of modern-day direct marketing. His innovations included the magazine subscription card, the toll-free 1-800 number, loyalty rewards programs, and many more. He identified, named, and defined the term "direct marketing" in a 1967 speech at MIT, and was inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame in 1998. 

............................

In 1947, he was hired as a copywriter at Maxwell Sackheim & Co. While there, he noted that their "mail order" accounts had the potential to be built into a broader line of business. He introduced a "direct marketing" approach to service them, using the medium of clients’ mailboxes as a way to develop a more personal connection with potential customers than general advertising had previously found possible.

To expand the direct marketing approach, Wunderman and his brother Irving, along with two colleagues, Ed Ricotta and Harry Kline, met on August 20, 1958, in Wunderman's "office" - a $30-a-night room at the Hotel Winslow in New York City - and with combined assets of $60,000 founded their own agency, Wunderman, Ricotta & Kline. In 1958, the firm opened its doors in New York City with a staff of seven. There were no clients. Nevertheless, WR&K attracted more than $2 million in billings during its first year. WR&K (later acquired by Young & Rubicam and eventually called Wunderman) was responsible for developing and/or promoting the Columbia Record Club, the 1-800 toll-free number for businesses (developed for a Toyota campaign), the magazine subscription card, and the postal ZIP code system. A long-time relationship with American Express also led to the first customer rewards program—a breakthrough means of keeping customers loyal to a brand that has since transformed the travel and retail industries as well.

Wunderman was elected to the Direct Marketing Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Advertising Hall of Fame in 1998. He received an honorary doctorate from Brooklyn College, City University of New York in 1984.[2] He was named one of twenty “Advertising Legends and Leaders” by AdWeek Magazine in 1998. In the July 23, 2001 issue of Time Magazine, he along with David Ogilvy and Sergio Zyman were heralded as “Great Pitchmen Over the Years.”[3]
Wunderman lectured at a host of schools, including Columbia University, Fordham University, Boston University, and M.I.T. His book Being Direct: Making Advertising Pay was published in January 1997 and republished with new material in 2004. An ebook version, which includes a new introduction from the author, was published in 2011.

An avid art collector, Wunderman donated nearly 300 works of Dogon artifacts to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the balance of his Dogon collection to the Musée de l'Homme in Paris, France. He was an exhibited photographer for many years. He studied photography at the New School for Social Research and then with private instructors. Fifty of his photographs of his Dogon art are part of the permanent collection of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and thirteen other museums. His work has been represented by galleries in New York and the village of Mougins, France. He, Jacqueline Kennedy, Karl Katz, and Cornell Capa helped found the International Center of Photography in New York. His book of photographs, named "Wunderman", has been published and distributed in 2008 by the global advertising agency that bears his name.

Beginning in 2010, a collection of Wunderman's papers have been housed at the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.[2] He also served as Chairman Emeritus of Wunderman.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Fine New York Yankees' pitcher:

Melvin Leon "Mel" Stottlemyre Sr. (November 13, 1941 – January 13, 2019) was an American professional baseball pitcher and pitching coach. He played for 11 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, and coached for 23 seasons. He was a five-time MLB All-Star and five-time World Series champion, as a coach.


Stottlemyre pitched in American Legion Baseball and attended Mabton High School in Mabton, Washington, and Yakima Valley Community College. A scout for the New York Yankees discovered Stottlemyre pitching for Yakima's baseball team, and signed him to a contract with no signing bonus on June 10, 1961. The Yankees assigned him to the Harlan Smokies of the Rookie-level Appalachian League. After appearing in eight games, the Yankees promoted him to the Auburn Yankees of the Class D New York–Penn League, and he appeared in seven games for Auburn.

Stottlemyre pitched to a 17–9 win–loss record and a 2.50 earned run average (ERA) with the Greensboro Yankees of the Class B Carolina League in 1962, and was promoted to the Richmond Virginians of the Class AAA International League in 1963. He alternated between starting and relieving for Richmond, before Ralph Houk, the Yankees' general manager, insisted that Stottlemyre be used exclusively as a starting pitcher. He recorded a 1.42 ERA in the 1964 season, the best in the International League.[1]

Called up midseason in 1964, Stottlemyre went 9–3 to help the Yankees to their fifth consecutive pennant while being on the cover of The Sporting News. In the 1964 World Series, Stottlemyre faced Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals three times in the seven-game Series. Stottlemyre bested Gibson in Game 2 to even the series, and got a no-decision in Game 5, but lost the decisive Game 7 as the Cardinals won the Series.[2]

Stottlemyre was named to the American League's (AL) roster for the 1965 Major League Baseball (MLB) All-Star Game, though he did not appear in the game.[3] He won 20 games in the 1965 season,[4] and led the AL with 18 complete games, 291 innings pitched, and 1,188 batters faced.[5] He appeared in the 1966 MLB All-Star Game.[6] He led the league with 20 losses.[7] Stottlemyre won 20 games in the 1968 and 1969 seasons.[4]

Stottlemyre threw 40 shutouts in his 11-season career, the same number as Hall of Fame lefty Sandy Koufax, which ties for 44th best all-time. Eighteen of those shutouts came in a three-season span from 1971-73.[8] The Yankees released Stottlemyre before the 1975 season.[9] Stottlemyre retired with 164 career wins and a 2.97 ERA.[4]

Known as a solid-hitting pitcher, on July 20, 1965, Stottlemyre once hit a rare inside-the-park grand slam. On September 26, 1964, he recorded five base hits in five at bats.[10]

More at Wikipedia
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(01-14-2019, 02:43 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Fine New York Yankees' pitcher:

Melvin Leon "Mel" Stottlemyre Sr. (November 13, 1941 – January 13, 2019) was an American professional baseball pitcher and pitching coach. He played for 11 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, and coached for 23 seasons. He was a five-time MLB All-Star and five-time World Series champion, as a coach.


Stottlemyre pitched in American Legion Baseball and attended Mabton High School in Mabton, Washington, and Yakima Valley Community College. A scout for the New York Yankees discovered Stottlemyre pitching for Yakima's baseball team, and signed him to a contract with no signing bonus on June 10, 1961. The Yankees assigned him to the Harlan Smokies of the Rookie-level Appalachian League. After appearing in eight games, the Yankees promoted him to the Auburn Yankees of the Class D New York–Penn League, and he appeared in seven games for Auburn.

Stottlemyre pitched to a 17–9 win–loss record and a 2.50 earned run average (ERA) with the Greensboro Yankees of the Class B Carolina League in 1962, and was promoted to the Richmond Virginians of the Class AAA International League in 1963. He alternated between starting and relieving for Richmond, before Ralph Houk, the Yankees' general manager, insisted that Stottlemyre be used exclusively as a starting pitcher. He recorded a 1.42 ERA in the 1964 season, the best in the International League.[1]

Called up midseason in 1964, Stottlemyre went 9–3 to help the Yankees to their fifth consecutive pennant while being on the cover of The Sporting News. In the 1964 World Series, Stottlemyre faced Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals three times in the seven-game Series. Stottlemyre bested Gibson in Game 2 to even the series, and got a no-decision in Game 5, but lost the decisive Game 7 as the Cardinals won the Series.[2]

Stottlemyre was named to the American League's (AL) roster for the 1965 Major League Baseball (MLB) All-Star Game, though he did not appear in the game.[3] He won 20 games in the 1965 season,[4] and led the AL with 18 complete games, 291 innings pitched, and 1,188 batters faced.[5] He appeared in the 1966 MLB All-Star Game.[6] He led the league with 20 losses.[7] Stottlemyre won 20 games in the 1968 and 1969 seasons.[4]

Stottlemyre threw 40 shutouts in his 11-season career, the same number as Hall of Fame lefty Sandy Koufax, which ties for 44th best all-time. Eighteen of those shutouts came in a three-season span from 1971-73.[8] The Yankees released Stottlemyre before the 1975 season.[9] Stottlemyre retired with 164 career wins and a 2.97 ERA.[4]

Known as a solid-hitting pitcher, on July 20, 1965, Stottlemyre once hit a rare inside-the-park grand slam. On September 26, 1964, he recorded five base hits in five at bats.[10]

More at Wikipedia
But shortly after that the AL took the bats out of the pitchers' hand with the launching of the DH. But pitchers still hit in the NL even though technically MLB is now one organization. Therefore the two leagues didn't merge completely the way they did in the NFL.
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Carol Channing, long-time entertainer:



Carol Elaine Channing (January 31, 1921 – January 15, 2019) was an American actress, singer, dancer and comedian. Known for starring in Broadway and film musicals, her characters typically radiated a fervent expressiveness and an easily identifiable voice, whether singing or for comedic effect. Channing also studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre in New York City.

She began as a Broadway musical actress, starring in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in 1949 and Hello, Dolly! in 1964, when she won the Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical. She revived both roles several times throughout her career, most recently playing Dolly in 1995. Channing was nominated for her first Tony Award in 1956 for The Vamp followed by a nomination in 1961 for Show Girl. She received her fourth Tony Award nomination for the musical Lorelei in 1974.

As a film actress, she won the Golden Globe Award and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Muzzy in Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Her other film appearances include The First Traveling Saleslady (1956) and Skidoo (1968). On television, she appeared as an entertainer on variety shows, from The Ed Sullivan Show in the 1950s to Hollywood Squares. She had a standout performance as The White Queen in the TV production of Alice in Wonderland (1985), and had the first of many TV specials in 1966, An Evening with Carol Channing.[2]

Channing was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame in 1981 and received a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award in 1995. She continued to perform and make appearances well into her 90s, singing songs from her repertoire and sharing stories with fans, cabaret style. She released an autobiography, Just Lucky I Guess, in 2002, and Larger Than Life, a documentary film about her career, was released in 2012.[3]

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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sociologist Nathan Glazer

Nathan Glazer (February 25, 1923 – January 19, 2019) was an American sociologist who taught at the University of California, Berkeley and for several decades at Harvard University.[1][2][3] He was a co-editor of the now-defunct policy journal The Public Interest.[4][5]
Known for books such as Beyond the Melting Pot, which deal with race and ethnicity, Glazer was critical of some of the Great Society programs of the mid-1960s.

He was often considered neoconservative in his thinking on domestic policy,[6][7][8] but remained a Democrat.[2] He described himself as "indifferent" to the neoconservative label with which he is most associated and remarked that it was an appellation not of his choosing.[3][8]

Much more at Wikipedia
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Comedienne Kaye Ballard

Ballard established herself as a musical comedian in the 1940s, joining the Spike Jones touring revue of entertainers. Capable of playing broad physical comedy as well as stand-up dialogue routines, she became familiar in television and stage productions. A phrase her mother had used when Kaye was a child, "Good luck with your MOUTH!", became her catchphrase in her sketches and on television. Ballard made her television debut on Henry Morgan's Great Talent Hunt, a short-lived NBC program hosted by Henry Morgan which first aired January 26, 1951. In 1954, she was the first person to record the song "Fly Me to the Moon".[citation needed]

In 1957, she and Alice Ghostley played the two wicked stepsisters in the live telecast of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella, starring Julie Andrews in the title role. During the 1961–1963 television seasons, Ballard was a regular on NBC's The Perry Como Show, as part of the Kraft Music Hall Players, along with Don Adams, Paul Lynde and Sandy Stewart. In 1962, she released an LP record, [[Peanuts (album}|Peanuts]], on which she played Lucy van Pelt from the comic strip namesake of the album (with Arthur Siegel playing Charlie Brown), and dramatizing a series of vignettes drawn from the strip's archive. In 1964 she had a guest role on The Patty Duke Show, playing a teacher for would-be models. From 1967 to 1969, she co-starred as Kaye Buell, a woman whose son marries her next door neighbor's daughter, in the NBC sitcom The Mothers-in-Law, with Eve Arden playing her neighbor. From 1970 to 1972, she also appeared as a regular on The Doris Day Show, playing restaurant owner Angie Pallucci . She made appearances on the American television game show Match Game. In 1977, she was a guest star on The Muppet Show. She also appeared on the television series Alice, in which she played a kleptomaniac phony medium, as well as Daddy Dearest, where she guest-starred opposite Richard Lewis and Don Rickles as a DMV clerk.[1]

Ballard starred on Broadway as Helen in The Golden Apple (1954) introducing the song "Lazy Afternoon". She portrayed Ruth in Joseph Papp's The Pirates of Penzance, Rosalie in Carnival! and the title role in Molly, an unsuccessful musical adaptation of the popular radio serial The Goldbergs. She created the role of the Countess and closed out-of-town in Marc Blitzstein's Reuben, Reuben, and played Ruth Sherwood in Wonderful Town at New York City Center in 1963.

In Long Beach, California, she played Mama Morton in Chicago and fought with a vacuum cleaner as Pauline in No, No, Nanette. In 1998, she played Hattie Walker in the Paper Mill Playhouse's acclaimed 1998 revival of Stephen Sondheim's Follies.[2] In 2005, she appeared in a road-company production of Nunsense, written by Dan Goggin. The following year, she completed her autobiography, How I Lost 10 Pounds in 53 Years.[2]

In 1995, she was awarded a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs Walk of Stars.[3]
She appeared in The Super Mario Bros. Super Show! as "Madam A-Go-Go," a mysterious fortune teller who appears in the episode "Fortune Teller". She also performed with The Fabulous Palm Springs Follies at the Plaza Theatre in Palm Springs, California.[4]

In December 2010, she, Donna McKechnie and Liliane Montevecchi starred in a Santa Fe production of From Broadway with Love, staged at the Lensic Theater.[5] Ballard was in the 2012 cabaret show Doin' It for Love, which premiered in Austin, Texas, at the historic Paramount Theatre. Starring Ballard and Montevecchi, the cast included Broadway dancer Lee Roy Reams. (The Austin performance benefited the Texas Humane Legislation Network.[6]) The show then went on to play in Los Angeles on March 8th and 10th of 2012. Ballard announced her official retirement in 2015 at the age of 89.[citation needed]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaye_Ballard

Russell Wayne Baker (August 14, 1925 – January 21, 2019) was an American journalist, narrator, writer of Pulitzer Prize-winning satirical commentary and self-critical prose, and author of Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography Growing Up (1982).[1] He was a columnist for The New York Times from 1962 to 1998, and hosted the PBS show Masterpiece Theatre from 1992 to 2004. The Forbes Media Guide Five Hundred, 1994 stated: "Baker, thanks to his singular gift of treating serious, even tragic events and trends with gentle humor, has become an American institution."[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell_Baker

Organist Jean Guillou, who had an eclectic repertory:

Guillou was born in Angers. Following his first studies in piano and organ, he became organist at the church St. Serge in Angers at the age of 12. He studied then at the Paris Conservatoire under Marcel Dupré, Maurice Duruflé and Olivier Messiaen. In 1955, he accepted a position as professor of organ and composition at the Institute of Sacred Music in Lisbon. In 1958 he moved to Berlin, where he lived for the following five years, during which he composed and premiered his first works. In 1963 he returned to Paris, having been appointed Titular Organist at Saint Eustache church in succession to André Marchal. Appointed Organiste Titulaire Emerite at St. Eustache in September 2014, Guillou completed 52 years as organist of that church in March 2015, when he was succeeded by two co-titulaires.[1]
He has a worldwide reputation as a concert organist and improviser. Additionally, he often performrd as a pianist; for example, he gave the English and French premieres of Julius Reubke's neglected piano Sonata in B-flat minor.

Guillou's engagement in organ building led to collaborations with several organ builders and the construction of new instruments in l'Alpe d'Huez( F) (1978, Kleuker), in the Chant d'Oiseau church in Brussels (1981, Kleuker), in the Zürich's Tonhalle (1988, Kleuker-Steinmeyer) in the Conservatory of Naples (2006, Tamburini-Zanin) in the Auditorio de Tenerife (2005, Blancafort) and most recently in the San Antonio dei Portoghesi church in Rome (2008, Mascioni) and in the Cathedral of Leon in Spain (2013, Klais).

He composed over 90 works - for organ, chamber and orchestral music - as well as numerous transcriptions for organ, mainly published by Schott-Music. In addition, he has issued more than 100 recordings (Philips, Dorian, Festivo, Decca, Augure among others) including the complete organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach, César Franck, Robert Schumann, numerous historical improvisations (e.g., Visions Cosmiques - 1969, or Jeux d'orgue - 1970, both re-edited in 2010 by Universal-Decca), as well as most of his own organ compositions on a series of 7 CDs (2010) for the Universal - Decca label.[1]

From 1970-2005, Guillou taught organ performance and improvisation at the annual Züricher International Meisterkurse. Since 2007, these masterclasses have been held at St. Eustache in Paris, France. Among his former pupils : Bernhard Haas, Francesco Filidei, Yanka Hekimova, Livia Mazzanti, Leonid Karev and Zsuzsa Elekes, and Jean-Baptiste Monnot. In July 2015 he was appointed Professor honoris causa at the Saar's Hochschule für Musik. He died in Paris on 26th January 2019.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Guillou#Life

Michel LeGrand, tune-smith:

Michel Legrand (French pronunciation: [miʃɛl ləɡʁɑ̃]; 24 February 1932 – 26 January 2019) was a French musical composer, arranger, conductor, and jazz pianist.[1] Legrand was a prolific composer, having written over 200 film and television scores, in addition to many songs.[2] His scores for the films of French New Wave director Jacques Demy, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967), earned Legrand his first Academy Award nominations. Legrand won his first Oscar for the song "The Windmills of Your Mind" from The Thomas Crown Affair (1968).[3]

 
Legrand was born in Paris[4]. His father, Raymond Legrand, was a conductor and composer[5] and his mother was Marcelle Ter-Mikaëlian, sister of conductor Jacques Hélian.[6]. They married in 1929[6]. He is of Armenian descent.[7].

Legrand composed more than two hundred film and television scores.[8] He won three Oscars[9] and five Grammys[10]. He studied music at the Paris Conservatoire from age 11, working with, among others, Nadia Boulanger[11]. Legrand graduated with top honors as both a composer and a pianist.[8] His sister Christiane Legrand was a member of the Swingle Singers and his niece Victoria Legrand is a member of the indie rock duo Beach House.[12]

Legrand composed music for Jacques Demy's films The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964) and The Young Girls of Rochefort (1966), and appeared and performed in Agnès Varda's Cleo from 5 to 7 (1961). He also composed music for The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) (which features "The Windmills of Your Mind"), The Lady in the Car with Glasses and a Gun (1970), The Go-Between (1971), Summer of '42 (1971), Orson Welles's last-completed film F for Fake (1974) and would later compose the score for Welles's posthumously-released movie The Other Side of the Wind (2018). He also composed the score for Yentl (1983), as well as the film score for Louis Malle's film Atlantic City (1980). His instrumental version of the theme from Brian's Song charted 56th in 1972 on the Billboard's pop chart.[13]
He died in Paris on 26 January 2019 at the age of 86, a month shy of his 87th birthday.[14] He remained active until his death and had concerts scheduled to take place in the spring.[15]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Legrand
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Quarterback Wade Wilson


Charles Wade Wilson (February 1, 1959 – February 1, 2019) was an American football coach and previously a quarterback who played for the Minnesota Vikings, Atlanta Falcons, New Orleans Saints, Dallas Cowboys and the Oakland Raiders in a seventeen-year career from 1981 to 1998 in the National Football League (NFL). He was quarterbacks coach for the Dallas Cowboys from 2000 to 2002 and from 2007 to 2017 and the Chicago Bears from 2004 to 2006.[1] He played college football for Texas A&M University-Commerce (formerly East Texas State University), where he was an NAIA All-American Quarterback and led the Lions to the NAIA national semifinals during the 1980 season.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wade_Wilso..._football)
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Baseball great Frank Robinson

Frank Robinson (August 31, 1935 – February 7, 2019) was an American outfielder and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB) who played for five teams from 1956 to 1976, and became the only player to be named the Most Valuable Player of both the National League and American League.[1] He was named the NL MVP with the Cincinnati Reds in 1961 after leading the team to the pennant with a .323 batting average, and won the AL MVP in 1966 in his first season with the Baltimore Orioles after winning the Triple Crown. Robinson helped lead the Orioles to World Series titles in 1966 and 1970. A 14-time All-Star, Robinson's 586 career home runs ranked fourth in major league history at the time of his retirement, and he ranked sixth in total bases (5,373) and tenth in runs scored (1,829).[2] Robinson was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 1982.

In 1975, Robinson became the first black manager in major league history.[3] He managed the Cleveland Indians during the last two years of his playing career, compiling a 186–189 record. He went on to manage the San Francisco Giants, the Baltimore Orioles, and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals. For most of the last two decades of his life, Robinson served in various executive positions for Major League Baseball, concluding as honorary President of the American League.[4]

Much more at Wikipedia

[Image: 95px-Indians20_FrankRobinson.png][Image: 95px-CincinnatiReds20.png][Image: 95px-FrankRobinson20.png]

[Image: Robinson_Frank_Plaque_NBL.png?itok=zCfBjma3][url=https://baseballhall.org/sites/default/files/styles/large/public/Robinson_Frank_Plaque_NBL.png?itok=zCfBjma3][/url]

Frank Robinson had the ability and intensity on the diamond that few possess. Robinson would crowd the plate like he owned it. “Pitchers did me a favor when they knocked me down,” he said. “It made me more determined. I wouldn’t let that pitcher get me out. They say you can’t hit if you’re on your back, but I didn’t hit on my back. I got up.”

He was recognized as one of the most feared baserunners of his era and showed reckless abandon on the base paths. “The baselines belongs to the runner, and whenever I was running the bases, I always slid hard. I wanted infielders to have that instant’s hesitation about coming across the bag at second or about standing in there awaiting a throw to make a tag. There are only 27 outs in a ballgame, and it was my job to save one for my team every time I possibly could.”

Robinson broke into the National League as a 20-year-old in 1956 and tied a rookie record with 38 home runs en route to NL Rookie of the Year honors. Over the next decade and a half, Robinson was one of the most feared hitters in the game. He won the Triple Crown in 1966 and was the first player in major league history to win the MVP Award in both leagues. A 12-time All-Star, he also took home World Series MVP honors in 1966 and the All-Star Game MVP Award in 1971.

When asked by a fan how he would pitch to Frank Robinson, All-Star pitcher Jim Bouton replied, “Reluctantly.” In 1975, as his playing days wound down with the Cleveland Indians, he was named the club’s player-manager. He was the first African-American to manage a major league club. He also managed the Giants, Orioles, Expos and Nationals and was named American League Manager of the Year in 1989.

Former Expos and Nationals GM Jim Bowden commented, “I have a lot of respect for Frank Robinson. He has respect for the game of baseball and the way it should be played. I was pleased because he is a man of his word. He said he was going to do something, and he follows up and he does it.”

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/robinson-frank

As a fan of the Detroit Tigers in the late 1960s and early 1970s I considered him Menace #1.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Former Congressional Representative John Dingell (D-MI):

John David Dingell Jr. (July 8, 1926 – February 7, 2019) was an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from December 13, 1955, until January 3, 2015. A member of the Democratic Party, he holds the record for longest-ever serving Congressperson in American history, representing Michigan for over 59 years. He most recently served as the representative for Michigan's 12th congressional district.
Dingell began his congressional career representing Michigan's 16th district by succeeding his father, John Dingell Sr., who had held the seat for 22 years. Having served for over 59 years,[1] he has the longest Congressional tenure in U.S. history. He was also the longest-serving Dean of the U.S. House of Representatives and Dean of the Michigan congressional delegation. Dingell was one of the final two World War II veterans to have served in Congress; the other is Texas Representative Ralph Hall, who also left Congress in 2015.[2] Dingell was a longtime member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee and chaired the committee for multiple terms.
Dingell announced on February 24, 2014, that he would not seek reelection to a 31st term in Congress.[3] His wife, Debbie Dingell, ran to succeed her husband and defeated Republican Terry Bowman in the general election on November 4, 2014.[4][5] He was the last member of Congress who had served in the 1950s and during the presidencies of Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy. President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2014.[6]

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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British stage and screen actor Albert Finney:



Albert Finney (9 May 1936 – 7 February 2019) was an English actor. He attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and began to work in the theatre as a Shakespearean actor before switching to film. Finney quickly attained prominence on screen in the early 1960s, debuting with The Entertainer (1960), directed by Tony Richardson, who had previously directed him in plays. He maintained a successful career in theatre, film and television.

He is known for his roles in Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (also 1960), Tom Jones (1963), Two for the Road (1967), Scrooge (1970), Annie (1982), The Dresser (1983), Miller's Crossing (1990), A Man of No Imprtance (1994), Erin Brockovich (2000), Big Fish (2003), The Bourne Ultimatum (2007), Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007), The Bourne Legacy (2012), and the James Bond film Skyfall (2012).

A recipient of BAFTA, Golden Globe, Emmy and Screen Actors Guild Awards, Finney was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor four times, for Tom Jones (1963), Murder on the Orient Express (1974), The Dresser (1983), and Under the Volcano (1984); he was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in Erin Brockovich (2000). His performance as Winston Churchill in the BBCHBO television biographical film The Gathering Storm (2002) saw him receive a number of accolades.


More at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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