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Obituaries
designer Pierre Cardin

PARIS (AP) — French fashion designer Pierre Cardin possessed a wildly inventive artistic sensibility tempered by a stiff dose of business sense. He had no problem acknowledging that he earned more from a pair of stockings than from a haute-couture gown with a six-figure price tag.
Cardin, who died Tuesday at age 98, was the ultimate entrepreneurial designer. He understood the importance his exclusive haute couture shows played in stoking consumer desire and became an early pioneer of licensing. His name emblazoned hundreds of products, from accessories to home goods.
“The numbers don’t lie,” Cardin said in a 1970 French television interview. “I earn more from the sale of a necktie than from the sale of a million-franc dress. It’s counterintuitive, but the accounts prove it. In the end, it’s all about the numbers.”
The French Academy of Fine Arts announced Cardin’s death in a tweet. He had been among its illustrious members since 1992. The academy did not give a cause of death or say where the designer died.
Designer Jean-Paul Gaultier, who made his debut in Cardin’s maison, paid tribute to his mentor on Twitter: “Thank you Mister Cardin to have opened for me the doors of fashion and made my dream possible.”
Along with fellow Frenchman Andre Courreges and Spain’s Paco Rabanne, two other Paris-based designers known for their avant-garde Space Age styles, Cardin revolutionized fashion starting in the early 1950s.

At a time when other Paris labels were obsessed with flattering the female form, Cardin’s designs cast the wearer as a sort of glorified hanger, there to showcase the sharp shapes and graphic patterns of the clothes. Created for neither pragmatists nor wallflowers, his designs were all about making a big entrance — sometimes very literally.
Gowns and bodysuits in fluorescent spandex were fitted with plastic hoops that stood away from the body at the waist, elbows, wrists and knees. Bubble dresses and capes enveloped their wearers in oversized spheres of fabric. Toques were shaped like flying saucers; bucket hats sheathed the models’ entire head, with cutout windshields at the eyes.
“Fashion is always ridiculous, seen from before or after. But in the moment, it’s marvelous,” Cardin said in the 1970 interview.
A quote on his label’s website summed up his philosophy: “The clothing I prefer is the one I create for a life that does not yet exist, the world of tomorrow.”

Cardin’s name embossed thousands of products, from wristwatches to bed sheets. In the brand’s heyday, goods bearing his fancy cursive signature were sold at some 100,000 outlets worldwide.
That number dwindled dramatically in later years, as Cardin products were increasingly regarded as cheaply made and his clothing designs — which, decades later, remained virtually unchanged from its ’60s-era styles — felt dated.
A savvy businessman, Cardin used his fabulous wealth to snap up top-notch properties in Paris, including the belle epoque restaurant Maxim’s, which he also frequented. His flagship store, located next to the presidential Elysee Palace in Paris, continues to showcase eye-catching designs.

Cardin was born on July 7, 1922, in a small town near Venice, Italy, to a modest, working-class family. When he was a child, the family moved to Saint Etienne in central France, where Cardin was schooled and became an apprentice to a tailor at age 14.
Cardin later embraced a status as a self-made man, saying in the 1970 TV interview that going it alone “makes you see life in a much more real way and forces you to take decisions and to be courageous.

“It’s much more difficult to enter a dark woods alone than when you already know the way through,” he said.

After moving to Paris, he worked as an assistant in the House of Paquin starting in 1945 and also helped design costumes for the likes of filmmaker Jean Cocteau. He was involved in creating the costumes for the director’s 1946 hit, “Beauty and the Beast.”

After working briefly with Elsa Schiaparelli and Christian Dior, Cardin opened his own fashion house in Paris’ posh 1st district, starting with costumes and masks.

Cardin delivered his first real collection in 1953. Success quickly followed, with the 1954 launch of the celebrated “bubble” dress, which put the label on the map.

Cardin staged his first ready-to-wear show in 1959 at Paris’ Printemps department store, a bold initiative that got him temporarily kicked out of the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture. Cardin’s relationship with the organization — the governing body of French fashion — was rocky, and he later left of his own volition to stage shows on his own terms.

Cardin’s high-profile relationship with French actress Jeanne Moreau, the smoky-voiced blonde of “Jules and Jim” fame, also helped boost the brand’s profile. Described by both as a “true love,” the couple’s relationship lasted about five years, though they never married.



For Cardin, the astronomical expense of producing haute-couture collections was an investment. Even though the clothing’s pharaonic prices didn’t cover the cost of crafting the made-to-measure garments, media coverage generated by the couture shows helped sell affordable items, like hats, belts and underwear.

As Cardin’s fame and fortune spiked, so did his real estate portfolio. He long lived an austere, almost monastic existence with his sister in a sprawling apartment just across from the Elysee Palace and bought up so much topflight real estate in the neighborhood that fashion insiders joked he could have mounted a coup d’état.

In addition to his women’s and men’s clothing boutiques, Cardin opened a children’s shop, a furniture store and the Espace Cardin, a sprawling hall in central Paris where the designer would later stage fashion shows, as well as plays, ballet performances and other cultural events.



Beyond clothes, Cardin put his stamp on perfumes, makeup, porcelain, chocolates, a resort in the south of France and even the velvet-walled watering hole Maxim’s — where he could often be seen at lunch.

The 1970s saw a huge Cardin expansion that brought his outlets to more than 100,000, with about as many workers producing under the Cardin label worldwide.



Cardin was in the vanguard in recognizing the importance of Asia, both as a manufacturing hub and for its consumer potential. He was present in Japan starting in the early 1960s, and in 1979 became the first Western designer to stage a fashion show in China.

In 1986, he inked a deal with Soviet authorities to open a showroom in the Communist nation to sell clothes locally made under his label.

In his later life, with no heir apparent, Cardin dismantled much of his vast empire, selling dozens of his Chinese licenses to two local firms in 2009.

Two years later, he told the Wall Street Journal that he’d be willing to sell his entire company, at that point including an estimated 500-600 licenses , for $1.4 billion.

____
Sylvie Corbet in Paris contributed. Former AP correspondents Suzy Patterson and Jenny Barchfield contributed biographical information to this obituary.

https://apnews.com/article/paris-europe-pierre-cardin-france-4e00ace15b988d71c96f3e09940cba00
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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A reminder on how dangerous COVID-19: it can kill the rich and powerful even if they live in the most disciplined society that people generally think free.



Yuichiro Hata (羽田 雄一郎, Hata Yūichirō, 29 July 1967 – 27 December 2020) was a Japanese politician of the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan and a member of the House of Councillors in the Diet of Japan. A native of Setagaya, Tokyo, and graduate of Tamagawa University, he was elected to the House of Councillors for the first time in 1999, a position he retained until his death in 2020. Hata was the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism from 4 June 2012 to 26 December 2012. He was the son of the late Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata.

Hata was a member of the Itochu Foundation during his time as a student at Tamagawa University. He graduated from the univeristy with a Bachelor of Arts in March 1993. Early in his career Hata was a secretary to his father, Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata, during the latter's tenure in the House of Representatives.[1]

Hata served as member of the House of Councillors in the Diet beginning with his election in 1999.[2] He was affiliated with the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), the Democratic Party for the People (DPP) after the merger of the Democratic Party and Kibō no Tō, and finally Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDP) after the DPP's dissolution.[3] On 4 June 2012 Hata was appointed to be the Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism by Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda.[1] Following the loss of the Democratic Party of Japan to the Liberal Democratic Party in the 2012 Japanese general election, Noda and his Cabinet, including Hata, were succeeded by Shinzo Abe and his Cabinet on 26 December 2012.[4] In all, he served as a legislator for five terms and was the initial Secretary-General of the Upper House caucus of the CDP at the time of his death in December 2020.[5]




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Generally, Hata was part of Japan's 
center-left political parties. He was a member of the DPJ and later, the CDP, both of which are center-left parties. He held positions consistent with the platform of those parties. He was opposed to the revision of Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution that prohibits Japan from going to war. After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, he became critical of Japan's use of nuclear power, stating that the country should aim to get rid of its plants eventually and that the country should not support nuclear projects in other countries.[8] Hata was a supporter of agricultural protectionism in regards to fair trade agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.[9]



Yuichiro Hata died in Tokyo on 27 December 2020 at 53 from [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19]COVID-19 while being transported to University of Tokyo Hospital.[2] He is the first Japanese legislator to die of the disease.[5]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuichiro_Hata
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Elected to the US House of Representatives... died of COVID-19 before he could be inaugurated. Died at age 41.

Luke Joshua Letlow (December 6, 1979 – December 29, 2020)[1][2] was an American politician from the state of Louisiana. A Republican, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives for Louisiana's 5th congressional district in 2020 but died of COVID-19 before he could take office. Before his election to Congress, Letlow served as chief of staff to retiring Representative Ralph Abraham.

Letlow worked for Bobby Jindal during Jindal's tenure in the United States House of Representatives for Louisiana's 1st congressional district as his congressional district director from 2005 to 2008, and during Jindal's first term as governor of Louisiana as director of intergovernmental affairs from 2008 to 2010.[6] He then worked as director of government and community affairs for QEP Resources, an energy company based in Denver.[7][1] Letlow returned to Louisiana in 2014 to serve as campaign manager for Ralph Abraham during his election for Louisiana's 5th congressional district.[4] He served as Abraham's chief of staff during his three-term tenure.[5]


On March 9, 2020, after Abraham honored his pledge not to serve more than three terms, Letlow announced his candidacy.[8] Abraham publicly endorsed him concurrent with Letlow's announcement.[5] In the nonpartisan blanket primary on November 3, Letlow finished in first place with 33% of the vote, while State Representative Lance Harris, a fellow Republican, finished second with 17%.[9] Letlow won the December 5 runoff election with 62% of the vote.[10][11]

Per Louisiana state law, a special election will be required to elect a candidate to represent the congressional district. The district, which includes much of Eastern Louisiana, is predominantly Republican.[12]

Letlow lived in Start, Louisiana, with his wife, Julia, and their two children.[5]
On December 18, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, Letlow announced that he had tested positive for the virus. He was hospitalized in Monroe.[13] After his condition deteriorated, he was transferred to the intensive care unit of Ochsner LSU Health Shreveport on December 23.[14] On December 29, Letlow died of complications of COVID-19 at the age of 41, five days before he was scheduled to be sworn into office.[2][13] The hospital reported that he had no underlying conditions when admitted but died in the ICU of a heart attack after a procedure.[8]

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards ordered flags in the state to be flown at half-staff on the day of Congressman-elect Letlow’s funeral.[15]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luke_Letlow
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Dawn Elberta Wells (October 18, 1938 – December 30, 2020) was an American actress who became known for her role as Mary Ann Summers on the CBS sitcom Gilligan's Island.


In 1959, Wells was crowned Miss Nevada and represented her state in the Miss America 1960 pageant in Atlantic City, New Jersey.[2][3]
In Hollywood, Wells made her debut on ABC's The Roaring 20s and the movie The New Interns and was cast in episodes of such television series as The Joey Bishop Show77 Sunset StripThe Cheyenne ShowMaverick, and Bonanza, before she took the role of Mary Ann on Gilligan's Island. She reprised her character in the various Gilligan's Island reunion specials, including the reunion cartoon spin-off Gilligan's Planet and three reunion movies: Rescue from Gilligan's IslandThe Castaways on Gilligan's Island, and The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island.
She also appeared as a guest star on Wagon TrainTales of Wells Fargo87th PrecinctSurfside 6Hawaiian EyeRipcordThe EvergladesThe DetectivesIt's a Man's WorldChanningLaramieBurke's LawThe InvadersThe Wild Wild WestThe F.B.I.Vega$The Love BoatFantasy IslandMatt HoustonALFHerman's HeadThree SistersPastor Greg, and Roseanne.
[Image: 220px-Dawn_Wells_1975.jpg]

Wells had small roles in the early 1960s films [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palm_Springs_Weekend]Palm Springs Weekend
 and The New Interns, and later starred with Michael Dante in the independent 1975 film Winterhawk, playing a Western settler kidnapped by a Native Ametican chief. Her other films include The Town That Dreaded SundownReturn to Boggy CreekLover's KnotSoulmatesForever for Now, and Super Sucker. In fall 2011, she began filming Silent But Deadly (originally titled Hotel Arthritis),[4] a comedy horror film released in 2012.

Following Gilligan's Island, Wells embarked on a theater career, appearing in nearly one hundred theatrical productions as of July 2009. She spent the majority of the 1970s, and 1980s, touring in musical theater productions. She also had a one-woman show at the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas in 1985.

In 1993, Wells published Mary Ann's Gilligan's Island Cookbook with co-writers Ken Beck and Jim Clark, including a foreword by Bob Denver. She was close to Alan Hale Jr., who played The Skipper on Gilligan's Island, even after the series completed its run, and he contributed a family recipe ("Kansas Chicken and Dumplings") to her cookbook. Hale's character was the inspiration behind such concoctions as Skipper's Coconut Pie, Skipper's Navy Bean Soup, and Skipper's Goodbye Ribeye, and he is depicted as Skipper Jonas Grumby in numerous photographs throughout the book. She said in a 2014 interview with GoErie.com, "Alan could not have been kinder to a young actress. He was a real peach."[5]

In 2005, Wells consigned her original gingham blouse and shorts ensemble for sale from her signature role. Beverly Hills auction house Profiles in History sold it for $20,700.[2]

In 2014, Wells released What Would Mary Ann Do? A Guide to Life, which she co-wrote with Steve Stinson. The book was released to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Gilligan's Island.[6]
In May 2016, Wells was named Marketing Ambassador to MeTV Network.[7] In January 2019, she promoted the Gilligan's Island television series on the MeTV television network.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dawn_Wells
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Good bye, Mary Ann.
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Innovative physician melding medicine and social work.

H. Jack Geiger (born Herman J. Geiger; November 11, 1925 – December 28, 2020) was an American physician and civil rights activist. He was a leader in the field of social medicine, the philosophy that doctors had a responsibility to treat the social as well as medical conditions that adversely affected patients' health, famously (and controversially) writing prescriptions for food for impoverished patients suffering from malnutrition. He was one of the doctors to bring the community health center model to the United States, starting a network that serves 28 million low-income patients as of 2020.

The Arthur C. Logan Professor of Community Medicine at the City University of New York School of Medicine, Geiger was a cofounder and president of Physicians for Human Rights as well as a cofounder and president of Physicians for Social Responsibility, each of which won Nobel Peace Prizes.

With the help of a loan from Lee, Geiger enrolled at the University of Wisconsin in 1941.[2] At night he worked at The Madison Capitol Times newspaper, though still under 18, Geiger had to acquire a special exemption from Madison's curfew for minors.[1]

In 1942, Geiger joined A. Philip Randolph and Bayard Rustin who were planning a march on Washington in protest of racial discrimination in the defense factories for World War II; they succeeded in pressuring President Franklin D. Roosevelt to take measures against this without going through with the march.[4] In 1943, Geiger met James Farmer, the founder of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), which prompted Geiger to start a CORE chapter in Madison, one of the earliest chapters.[1]



The same year, Geiger turned 18 and left school to join the war effort, enlisting with the merchant marine because it was the only racially integrated military service at the time.[3] He worked on the only ship in World War II with an African American captain, Hugh Mulzac on the SS Booker T. Washington.[4] He was discharged in 1947 and enrolled at the University of Chicago to pursue pre-med studies, but where he also encountered significant anti-Black discrimination.[1] He organized a strike, with two thousand faculty and students protesting issues like the exclusion of African American patients from certain hospitals and the rejection of qualified African American applicants to the medical school.[4] For his "extracurricular" activities, he was blackballed by the American Medical Association and returned to working in journalism, unable to gain entrance to medical school.[1] Working as a science journalist, he was active in efforts to use science in the service of human needs.[5]


After five years in journalism, Geiger secured an assignment that allowed him to approach medical school deans.[3] Jack Caughey of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine was encouraging and Geiger successfully enrolled in 1954.[3] While in medical school, a Rockefeller grant[3] allowed him to spend five months working in Pholela, South Africa, at a health clinic that also invested in other local improvements—latrines, vegetable gardens, feeding programs—and succeeded thanks significantly to local staff members engagement with the community this way.[1] The experience spurred an interest in working in international health.[1] Geiger received his M.D. from Case Western in 1958.[6][7]

Geiger next trained in internal medicine at Harvard, working at Boston City Hospital from 1958 to 1964.[6][7] During this time, he also earned a master's degree in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health, and was a fellow at Harvard University's Research Training Program in Social Science and Medicine.[6]

In 1961, Geiger cofounded Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), which argued that the government was understating the extent of destruction a nuclear war would cause.[1] Geiger conducted "the bombing run" at the group's public presentations, detailing the devastation a one-megaton nuclear bomb would inflict on the city hosting the meeting.[1] He coauthored one of the first papers to estimate the medical toll of nuclear war, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in May 1962, just months before the Cuban Missile Crisis.[1] Taking Boston as a case study, it predicted a nuclear strike would leave millions dead and injured, vastly outstripping the hospital capacity that would remain to treat those who (initially) survived. The article argued physicians had to consider "the prevention of thermonuclear war" as a relevant part of preventive medicine.[1] In 1985, PSR was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for its contributions to the disarmament effort.[8]

In 1964, Geiger participated in the Freedom Summer, serving as field coordinator of a group of health care workers called the Medical Committee for Human Rights,[3] who went to Mississippi to care for the civil rights activists in voting rights campaign.[8] In 1965, he organized medical care for the participants of the Selma to Montgomery march with Martin Luther King, Jr.[8] Working in the US South, he found many African Americans were living in conditions strikingly similar to the extreme poverty he had seen in apartheid South Africa and realized the health disparities abroad that he wanted to address also existed much closer to home.[3] President Lyndon B. Johnson's Office of Economic Opportunity (part of the War on Poverty) as well as grants from Tufts University afforded him and two other doctors, John Hatch and Count Gibson, the chance to set up a clinic in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, which they modeled after the one Geiger had seen in South Africa: not only treating sick patients but also spending grant money digging wells and privies, establishing a library, and a variety of other social, educational and economic services.[1] Here Geiger wrote controversial prescriptions for food, paid out of the pharmacy budget, which drew the displeasure of the state's Governor.[3] Geiger replied:

Quote:"Yeah, well, the last time I looked in my medical textbooks, they said the specific therapy for malnutrition was food."

The Mound Bayou clinic, called the Delta Health Center, and a similar center in Columbia Point, Boston became a national model of care via community health centers and grew into network of clinics.[9] As of 2020, the network encompasses more than 1,300 clinics at more than 9000 sites and serves about 28 million low-income patients.[1]

From 1968 to 1971, Geiger was chair of the Department of Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, then Visiting Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 1972–73.[6] For the following five years, he was Chair of the Department of Community Medicine at the State University of New York at Stonybrook School of Medicine,[6] then in 1978, joined the faculty at the City University of New York Medical School as a professor of community medicine.[1] He was founding Chair of the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine (CHASM), from 1978 until he took emeritus status in 1996.[8] In the interim he was also promoted to Arthur C. Logan Professor of Community Medicine.[10]



In 1986, Geiger was a cofounder (and later president) of Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), which shared in the Nobel Peace Prize in 1988 for its contributions to the effort to ban land mines.[11] The group applied medical skills to the investigation of human rights abuses and offered medical and humanitarian aid to victims of such abuses.[11] Geiger participated in human rights missions for PHR, the United Nations, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science to former Yugoslavia, Iraq and Kurdistan, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and South Africa.[10][12]



He was also a cofounder and president of the Committee for Health in South Africa and a cofounder and national program coordinator of the Medical Committee for Human Rights.[10]



In 1973, Geiger received the first Award for Excellence of the American Public Health Association for "exceptionally meritorious achievement in improving the health of the American people" in 1973.[4] In 1982, he received Award of Merit in Global Public Health from the Public Health Association of New York.[4]

In 1993, Geiger was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), United States National Academy of Sciences.[4] In 1998, he received the IOM's highest honor, the Lienhardt Award for "outstanding contributions to minority health".[10] In 1998 he also received the American Public Health Association's Sedgewick Memorial Medal for Distinguished Service in Public Health.[6] He also won the 2014 Frank A. Calderone Prize,[13] public health's highest honor, for foundational work demonstrating the interrelation of health and human rights throughout his career.[14]



In recognition of Geiger's pathbreaking work on discrimination in health care, the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian American Caucuses founded the H. Jack Geiger Congressional Fellowships on Health Disparities to support young minority scholars.[3][15]

Geiger received an honorary degree from Case Western in 2000[3] as well as an honorary doctorate of science from State University of New York.[16]
Personal life
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Just a reminder: if you think that 2020 was a bad year for the loss of baseball stars... you are right.

Baseball Lost A Team Of Legends This Year
By Howard Megdal

Filed under MLB


2020 has been a difficult year of loss in every corner of the world. It’s also been keenly cruel to the collective memory of Major League Baseball — and its best players. To be sure, we lose icons in the sport every year. But the sheer number and depth of the talent among those who died in 2020 is overwhelming.

In the span of just a few weeks, not just one but two iconic St. Louis Cardinals died: Bob Gibson and Lou Brock. These were defining members of many Cardinals championship teams as players who stayed within the St. Louis family for decades after their careers ended. They were routinely included in opening day festivities at Busch Stadium, wearing their red jackets.

We lost Tom Seaver, the defining Met. Joe Morgan, perhaps the best second baseman to ever play the game, with the Cincinnati Reds and numerous other teams. Whitey Ford, big game pitcher par excellence for the New York Yankees. Al Kaline: Mr. Tiger. And just Saturday, we lost Phil Neikro, the master of the knuckleball.

That’s seven Hall of Fame players. To put it in perspective, we lost seven Hall of Famers combined from 2016 to 2019: Frank Robinson in 2019; Willie McCovey and Red Schoendienst in 2018; Roy Halladay, Jim Bunning and Bobby Doerr in 2017; and Monte Irvin in 2016.

The last time as many as four Hall of Famers died was 2010, when Ron Santo, Robin Roberts, Bob Feller and Sparky Anderson all passed — though Anderson had earned induction as a manager, not a player. Most years since the turn of the century, it’s one or two Hall of Famers; in 2004 and 2008, it was none.

What also separates 2020, though, is the sheer depth of talent we lost. And that’s been what continues to hit home for me: the list includes longtime stars, All-Stars and postseason heroes beyond those who were inducted into Cooperstown. To make sense of it all, I wanted to think of it in baseball terms, to appreciate just how much player production came from players who have died in 2020.

This year has seen the deaths of 15 hitters and nine pitchers with at least 10 career wins above replacement,1 including 10 above 40 WAR. Compare that to 2019: eight hitters, six pitchers above 10 WAR, just three players above 40. Or 2018: eight hitters, seven pitchers at or above 10 WAR, with McCovey, Schoendienst and Rusty Staub the only three above 40.

This is no mere calculation. Every hit, every strikeout, every diving catch is remembered by thousands of people, those who watched or listened to it, those who witnessed it in person. So to truly comprehend the number and ability of the baseball players we lost in 2020, I’ve compiled a 26-man roster of those who died this year. Say what you will about the Dodgers: This is a team that I think could beat anyone.

Hitters
Starting lineup
C Hal Smith, 4.2 career WAR, 1955-64: Smith enjoyed a distinguished decade-long career catching for the Orioles, Kansas City Athletics, Pirates, Houston Colt .45s and Reds. He played a key role for the 1960 World Champion Pirates, slashing .295/.351/.508 for the eventual winners, and served as Houston’s catcher in the team’s very first game in 1962. He homered, too, as the Colt .45s won 11-2. Smith finished his career with three double-digit home run seasons, a slash line of .267/.317/.394, and yet somehow, on this team, he’s probably the No. 8 hitter.

1B Bob Watson, 28.3 WAR, 1966-84: Among the many distinguished, if not quite Hall of Fame worthy, players on this team, Watson made a pair of All-Star teams and earned MVP votes in three different seasons. The longtime Astro — who also saw time with the Red Sox, Yankees and Braves — drove in 100 runs twice. 1975 is an example of his typical consistency: a .324/.375/.495 slash line, with 18 home runs and an OPS+ of 149.

2B Joe Morgan, 100.5 WAR, 1963-84: The most valuable everyday player and owner of the second-best WAR on the roster, Morgan defined the position of second base for more than two decades. He made 10 All-Star teams, captured two MLB MVPs as the best player on the Cincinnati Reds dynasty of the mid-1970s, and did essentially everything well on a baseball field. His career slash line of .271/.392/.427 understates his offensive greatness, with much of that raw production coming during the offensively challenged 1960s. His OPS+ of 132 is impressive for any position, but it’s fourth all-time among the 177 primary second basemen with at least 1,000 games played in MLB history.

3B Dick Allen, 58.8 WAR, 1963-77: From a legacy perspective, this hurts most of all. Allen is, by all rights, a Hall of Famer, but his reputation of being difficult — something our 2020 eyes must see through the lens of being an outspoken Black man in Philadelphia in the 1960s — kept him from enshrinement. He looked set to get enough votes from this year’s Golden Era Veterans’ Committee, but COVID-19 pushed back by a year that meeting, which is held in person. Now, if and when the call is made to honor a career featuring a remarkable 156 career OPS+, the NL Rookie of the Year award, seven All-Star seasons and an AL MVP award, it will be up to the rest of us to stress how long overdue it was.

SS Tony Fernández, 45.3 WAR, 1983-2001: Fernández falls just shy of Hall of Fame enshrinement, according to Jay Jaffe, the dean of such evaluations, but had a tremendous career all the same. He made five All-Star teams and won four Gold Gloves at the most important defensive position, with a .288/.347/.399 career slash line. He stole 20 bases or more in seven seasons and played on five different postseason teams — with .327/.367/.420 career production in the playoffs.

LF Lou Brock, 45.4 WAR, 1961-79: The prototype for the speedy leadoff hitter, Brock stole 938 bases, made six All-Star teams and served as a fixture for three NL pennant-winning teams in St. Louis, including the World Series winners in 1964 and 1967. Brock’s raw slash line of .293/.343/.410 is also underrated because of the era — he led the NL in doubles and triples in 1968, and his ability to collect hits never disappeared. He finished with a .298 average over the final decade of his career, and in his final season at age 40, he hit .304.

CF Jim Wynn, 55.8 WAR, 1963-77: To get a sense of how great Jimmy Wynn was, consider that there are three Hall of Fame hitters on this roster, and yet Wynn’s WAR ranks third among them in the group, ahead of Brock. Wynn would have been adored by the sabermetric crowd — he produced a park-adjusted OPS+ of 129 — but a low batting average compounded by the era in which he played for much of his time made for a career slash line of just .250/.366/.436. (For context: Carlos Beltran, playing in a much more hitting-friendly period, finished with a raw slash line of .279/.350/.486, but his OPS+ was just 119.) Even so, Wynn cleared 30 home runs in three seasons, made three All-Star teams and would probably hit cleanup in this stacked lineup.

RF Al Kaline, 92.8 WAR, 1953-74: Mr. Tiger, one of the greatest to ever play the game, was an 18-time All-Star with 10 Gold Gloves. By WAR, he’s the fourth-best right fielder in the history of the game, trailing only Hank Aaron, Mel Ott and Roberto Clemente. His greatness started early — a batting title at age 20 — and didn’t wane for decades, with Kaline hitting .379/.400/.655 in the 1968 World Series for the Tigers in a win over the Cardinals. Kaline would be the three hitter in this lineup and a formidable figure on any team.

Bench
3B Tony Taylor, 23.2 WAR, 1958-76: Taylor made both All-Star teams in 1960 (they played twice back then!), served as a key member of some good and many not-so-good Phillies teams and eventually enjoyed three — yes, three — Tony Taylor Days in Philadelphia. Don’t let them fool you about Philly fans.

OF Claudell Washington, 19.6 WAR, 1974-90: A two-time All-Star and perfect fourth outfielder who played all three positions.

2B Frank Bolling, 16.9 WAR, 1954-66: Bolling was an elite fielder at second base with some power and was an All-Star in 1961 and 1962.

OF/1B Jay Johnstone, 16.5 WAR, 1966-85: A lefty bat off the bench who could play all three outfield positions along with first base.

IF Horace Clarke, 15.7 WAR, 1965-74: Clarke was a defining Yankee, to fans of a certain age, who could play second, third and short.

C Ed FitzGerald, 1.4 WAR, 1948-59: FitzGerald was a defense-first backup catcher.

2B Glenn Beckert, 15.6 WAR, 1965-75: A four-time All-Star and a Gold Glove winner at second base who could fill in around the infield or outfield.

Honorable mention: 1965 World Series hero OF Sweet Lou Johnson, 2B Damaso Garcia and 3B/SS Kim Batiste, who did this in the first playoff game I ever attended.

Pitchers
Rotation
SP Tom Seaver, 106 WAR, 1967-86: The Franchise was easily the best player in New York Mets history, and there’s an argument for him as the best pitcher in MLB history, too. Seaver made 12 All-Star teams and won three Cy Young Awards, along with five other top-five finishes in the Cy Young voting. His WAR ranks seventh all-time for pitchers, and five of the six ahead of him pitched decades before, during a pre-integrated MLB period, while Roger Clemens is the other — with his own complicated legacy. This is a deep, talented staff, but Tom Seaver gets the ball in Game 1 of any series it would play.

SP Bob Gibson, 81.7 WAR, 1959-75: A No. 2 starter only on this team, really, Gibson is 25th in WAR among all pitchers, meaning two of the top 25 in the history of the game died this year. Gibson might be ahead of Seaver if we’re purely talking 1968, when Gibson set the record in the live-ball era for single-season ERA at just 1.12. He was a nine-time All-Star and two-time Cy Young Award winner, and he won nine Gold Gloves. He also may have pitched the single most dominant World Series game ever.

SP Phil Niekro, 97 WAR, 1964-87: It is easy to get lost in the sheer magnitude of Niekro’s productivity — fourth all-time in innings pitched, with only Cy Young, Pud Galvin and Walter Johnson ahead of him — or the novelty of his pitch, the knuckleball, and miss just how great Niekro was at his best. He had five top-six Cy Young Award vote finishes, spreading them out over three different decades. He fielded his position extraordinarily well over his entire career — he won five Gold Gloves, the last coming in 1983, when he was 44 years old. He led the league in ERA and in winning percentage, but not in the same year — those two things happened 15 years apart! Niekro’s pitch, and his mastery of it, helped propel his singular career. And sadly, not only is he gone, but the knuckleball is, for now, extinct from MLB as well.

SP Whitey Ford, 53.6 WAR, 1950-67: The best big-game starting pitcher in New York Yankees history (a 2.71 ERA over 22 World Series starts) and author of a 25-4, 3.21 ERA season in the 1961 Maris-Mantle campaign, Ford was a critical part of 11 American League pennant winners and six World Series champions. He made 10 All-Star teams (two years he made two of them) and won a pair of ERA titles, rolling out stellar year after year playing in front of one of the greatest teams ever.

SP Johnny Antonelli, 31.2 WAR, 1948-61: Just a few minutes away from Ford, another big-game pitcher plied his trade for the New York Giants. Antonelli’s 21-7, 2.30 ERA season in 1954 won him the ERA title and a third-place MVP finish, before his 0.84 ERA in the World Series, including a complete game, helped New York upset the favored Cleveland Indians. Antonelli went west with the Giants and made both All-Star teams in 1959, among his six overall appearances as an All-Star. A stellar career.

Bullpen
RP Don Larsen, 12.5 WAR, 1953-67: Larsen belongs on this team not just because he did something in 1956 that nobody else has done: pitch a perfect game in the World Series. People like to boil his career down to that one game, but consider how well Larsen pitched for New York from 1955 to 1958: a 39-17 record, a 3.31 ERA. Larsen was a quality pitcher, and he certainly rose to the moment.

RP Ron Perranoski, 18.9 WAR, 1961-73: A shutdown closer, in the fireman variety as opposed to the typical one-inning guy, who dominated for the mid-1960s Dodgers and late-1960s Twins. He won MVP votes three times as a reliever.

RP Lindy McDaniel, 29.0 WAR, 1955-75: McDaniel was reliable in any role. His 1960 campaign for the Cardinals was exemplary but far from atypical: 12 wins, 27 saves, a 2.09 ERA and third in the Cy Young Award voting.

RP Dick Hyde, 6.1 WAR, 1955-61: A terribly underrated reliever who in 1958 posted a 1.75 ERA and led the American League in saves with the Washington Senators.

RP Mike McCormick, 17.4 WAR, 1956-71: An absolute stud of a pitcher who succeeded as both a starter (1967 NL Cy Young with the San Francisco Giants with league-leading 22 wins) and a reliever, so we’re using him here as the primary lefty out of the pen who could go multiple innings.

RP Bob Lee, 8.7 WAR, 1964-68: Posted consecutive seasons with a sub-2.00 ERA to begin his career with the Angels in 1964-65.

.... These really are all-time greats. Make a team of these and you would have a challenge to the 1927 Yankees or the Big Red Machine of the 1970's. Put any two of the starting rotation of pitchers on the staff of the 1927 Yankees and you would have an improvement. Morgan, Fernandez, Allen, and Kaline would have fit well into a "Murderer's Row" lineup. (OK, in view of the color bar in operation in the 1920's only Kaline would have made it)... 

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/bas...boola_feed

What a starting lineup!

Lou Brock, LF
Joe Morgan, 2B
Al Kaline, RF 
Dick Allen, 3B
Jimmy Wynn, CF
Bob Watson, 1B
Tony Fernandez, SS
Hal Smith, C
...and oh, what a starting rotation.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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RIP Gerry from Gerry & the Pacemakers. Don't Let the Sun Catch ya Cryin
Heart my 2 yr old Niece/yr old Nephew 2020 Heart
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Best known professionally as Tanya Roberts:


Victoria Leigh Blum (born October 15, 1955 died January 4, 2021),[1] known professionally as Tanya Roberts, was an American actress, producer, and model.[2] She was best known for playing Julie Rogers in the final season of the 1970s television series Charlie's Angels,[3] Stacey Sutton in the James Bond film A View to a Kill,[3][4][5] and Midge Pinciotti on That '70s Show.[3][4][5][6] She appeared in 81 episodes from 1998–2004, but eventually left the series to care for her sick husband.

Roberts began her career as a model in TV ads for ExcedrinUltra BriteClairol, and Cool Ray sunglasses. She played serious roles in the off-Broadway productions Picnic and Antigone. She also supported herself as an Arthur Murray dance instructor. Her film debut was the horror film Forced Entry (1975).[3][5] This was followed by the comedy film The Yum-Yum Girls (1976).[5]

In 1977, as her husband was securing his own screenwriting career, the couple moved to Hollywood. The following year, Roberts participated in the drama Fingers.[5] In 1979 Roberts appeared in the cult movie Tourist Trap,[4] Racquet,[3][5] and California Dreaming.[5] Roberts was featured in several television pilots which were not picked up; Zuma Beach (a 1978 comedy),[5] Pleasure Cove (1979),[11] and Waikiki (1980).[11]

Roberts was chosen in the summer of 1980 from some 2,000 candidates to replace Shelley Hack in the fifth season of the detective television series Charlie's Angels.[3] Roberts played Julie Rogers, a streetwise fighter who used her fists more than her gun. Producers hoped Roberts's presence would revitalize the series's declining ratings and regenerate media interest in the series. Before the season's premiere, Roberts was featured on the cover of People magazine with a headline asking if Roberts would be able to save the declining series from cancellation.[12] Despite the hype of Roberts's debut in November 1980, the series continually drew dismal ratings and was cancelled in June 1981.[13]

Roberts played Kiri, a slave rescued by protagonist Dar (Marc Singer) in the adventure fantasy film The Beastmaster (1982),[11] which became a cult film and[3][4][7][5] which included a topless swimming scene. She was featured in a nude pictorial in Playboy to help promote the movie, appearing on that issue's October 1982 cover. In 1983, Roberts filmed the Italian-made adventure fantasy film Hearts and Armour (also known as Paladini-storia d'armi e d'amori and Paladins — The Story of Love and Arms), based on the medieval novel Orlando Furioso.

[Image: 220px-Stacy_Keach_and_Tanya_Roberts.JPG]




She portrayed Velda, the secretary to private detective Mike Hammer, in the television movie Murder Me, Murder You (1983),[14] based on crime novelist Mickey Spillane’s iconic Mike Hammer private detective series. The two-part pilot spawned the syndicated television series Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer.[14] She declined to continue the role in the Mike Hammer series to work on her next project, the 1984 fantasy movie Sheena: Queen of the Jungle, in which she played the main character.[3][4][7][5][11] The movie was a box office and critical disaster, garnering her a nomination for "Worst Actress" at the Razzie Awards.[15]

Roberts appeared as Bond girl Stacey Sutton, a geologist, in A View to a Kill (1985).[3][4][5][11] In the wake of this performance, she again was nominated for a Razzie Award.[16] Roberts's other 1980s films include Night Eyes, an erotic thriller;[3][5] Body Slam (1987), an action movie set in the professional wrestling world (another cult favorite);[3][5] and Purgatory, a movie about a woman wrongfully imprisoned in Africa.[5]

Roberts starred in the erotic thriller Inner Sanctum (1991) alongside Margaux Hemingway.[5][17] In 1992, she played Kay Egan in Sins of Desire.[5] She appeared on the cable series Hot Line in 1995; and in the video game The Pandora Directive in 1996.[5]

In 1998, Roberts took the role of Midge Pinciotti on the television sitcom That '70s Show.[3][4][5] Roberts revealed on E! True Hollywood Story that she left the series in 2001 because her husband had become terminally ill. She departed from the show after the 3rd season and returned for a few special guest appearances in the 6th and 7th season, in 2004. She retired from acting in 2005. She wrote the foreword to the book The Q Guide to Charlie's Angels (2008).[18] She has maintained an active social media presence by hosting video chats on Facebook and Zoom during the COVID-19 pandemic.[6]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanya_Roberts
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Carrie Dann (1932-2021) was a Western Shoshone spiritual elder and activist for land and tribal rights.[8]
On April 1, 2007, Carrie Dann was arrested with 38 other activists for trespassing at the Nevada Test Site at a Nevada Desert Experience event protesting governmental programs at the site.[9][10] She has continued with activities to try to end nuclear testing and programs at the site.
In November 2008 Dann, with members of the Western Shoshone Defense Project and four other tribal and public interest groups, sued in federal court against the US and Canadian Barrick Gold, seeking an injunction to stop the "largest open pit cyanide heap leach gold mines in the United States - the Cortez Hills Expansion Project on Mt. Tenabo," Nevada. The Western Shoshone consider this to be sacred land. In addition to spiritual concerns, tribal and other groups are concerned about the proposed project's environmental impact on water, air and ground quality.[1]

Representation in documentary films
  • Newe Segobia is Not for Sale (1993) was produced by Jesse Drew. The film depicts confrontations between Federal Bureau of Land Management officers determined to impound the Dann sisters' livestock, and the Danns' demonstration of US treaty violations.

  • American Outrage (2008) is a documentary film about the Dann sisters and their decades-long struggle against the U.S. Government for the right to graze their horses on tribal grazing land.[11] The film follows the Dann sisters and tribal rights advocates as the case was ruled on by the US Supreme Court and the United Nations.[12]
(American First Peoples often get marginalized  in economic and political struggles). 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Dann_and_Carrie_Dann
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Paul Westphal, NBA Hall of Fame player and coach:


Paul Douglas Westphal (November 30, 1950 – January 2, 2021) was an American basketball player, head coach, and commentator.
Westphal played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1972 to 1984. Playing the guard position, he won an NBA championship with the Boston Celtics in the 1974 NBA Finals. Westphal played in the NBA Finals again in 1976 as a member of the Phoenix Suns. His NBA career also included stints with the Seattle SuperSonics and the New York Knicks. In addition to being a five-time All-Star selection, Westphal earned three All-NBA First Team selections and one Second Team honor.
After his playing career ended, Westphal began coaching. He coached college basketball for Southwestern Baptist Bible College (now Arizona Christian University), Grand Canyon University, and Pepperdine University, and served also as head coach of the Phoenix Suns, the Seattle SuperSonics, and the Sacramento Kings in the NBA. Westphal coached the Suns to the NBA Finals in 1993.
In 2019, Westphal was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame.

Westphal was born in Torrance, California.[1] He went to Aviation High School in Redondo Beach, California, from 1966 to 1969.[2] He attended the University of Southern California (USC), where he played college basketball for the USC Trojans as a guard. The Trojans had a 24–2 (.923) win-loss record in 1971, setting a Trojans record for winning percentage. He was an All-American and team captain in 1972. Playing for USC from 1970 to 1972, he averaged 16.9 points per game and led the Trojans with 20.3 points per game in 1972.[3]


The Boston Celtics selected Westphal with the 10th overall pick in the 1972 NBA draft.[3] After three seasons in Boston, including a championship in 1974, the Celtics traded Westphal and two second round draft picks to the Phoenix Suns for Charlie Scott.[4] In 1976, Westphal helped the Suns reach their first-ever NBA Finals appearance, where they played against the Celtics. In Game 5 of that series, often called "the greatest game ever played" in NBA history,[5][6][7] he made several critical plays that pushed the game into triple overtime before Boston prevailed.[8][9]
[Image: 180px-Paul_Westphal_USC.jpeg]

Westphal was sixth in the NBA in scoring average for the 1977–78 season at 25.2 points per game.
[10] In that season, he became the first NBA All-Star Weekend H-O-R-S-E Competition champion.[11] The following 1978–79 season, he was seventh in scoring average with 24.0 points per game.[12]
After the 1979–80 season, the Suns traded Westphal to the Seattle SuperSonics for Dennis Johnson,[13] where he played one season before signing with the New York Knicks as a free agent.[14][15] In 1983, he signed a two-year contract to Phoenix.[16] The Suns waived him before the 1984–85 season.[17]

In his NBA career, Westphal scored a total of 12,809 points for an average of 15.6 points per game, with 3,591 assists for an average of 4.4 assists per game. He also had 1,580 rebounds, for an average of 1.9 per game. He was a five-time All-Star, a three-time All-NBA first team selection, and a one-time second team All-NBA selection. He is Phoenix's fifth all-time leading scorer (9,564), averaging 20.6 points (1975–80, 1983–84). His No. 44 was retired by the Suns, and he is a member of their Ring of Honor.[18] Westphal was also inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on September 6, 2019.[19]

Westphal's coaching career started in 1985 at Southwestern Baptist Bible College (now Arizona Christian University), located in Phoenix. After compiling a 21–9 record in his lone season there, he moved on to Grand Canyon College, also in Phoenix, and after two seasons led them to the NAIA national title in 1988.[20][21]

In 1988, after three years in the college ranks, Westphal became an assistant coach with the Phoenix Suns under head coach Cotton Fitzsimmons, and in 1992, he succeeded Fitzsimmons as head coach of the Suns.[20][22] With players such as Kevin JohnsonDan Majerle, rookie Richard DumasCharles Barkley, and Danny Ainge, the Suns made it to the NBA Finals in Westphal's first season as a coach, but lost to the Chicago Bulls in six games.[23] While the Suns made the playoffs during each of Westphal's seasons as coach, they did not return to the Finals, and Westphal was let go during the 1995–96 season.[24] He served as an assistant coach for a high school team in Arizona for two years before he returned to the NBA as a coach with the SuperSonics for the 1998–99 season.[2] He coached in Seattle until he was fired 15 games into the 2000–01 season.[25]

Westphal returned to the college ranks in April 2001 at Pepperdine University. In his first season, Westphal led the Waves men's basketball team to a 22–9 record and tied nationally ranked Gonzaga University for the WCC title. The team achieved an at-large berth to the NCAA Tournament, but lost 83–74 to Wake Forest in the first round in a game played at ARCO Arena. This was the only postseason berth during the rest of Westphal's five-year tenure and he finished with an overall record of 74–72. After a 7–20 season in 2005–06, Westphal was fired on March 15, 2006.[26] Westphal has also worked as a studio analyst for Fox Sports Net West/Prime Ticket for Los Angeles Clippers and Los Angeles Lakers games, first joining them during the Clippers' run in the 2006 NBA Playoffs.[27]

[Image: 180px-Paul_Westphal_in_2014.jpg]

Westphal with [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooklyn_Nets]Brooklyn Nets in 2014

On June 28, 2007, the Dallas Mavericks announced they had hired Westphal as an assistant coach under head coach Avery Johnson.[28] When Johnson was replaced by Rick Carlisle, Westphal left coaching to become executive vice-president of basketball operations (under Donnie Nelson) for the Mavericks in October 2008.[29] On June 10, 2009, Westphal was named head coach of the Sacramento Kings.[30] Westphal was fired from the Kings on January 5, 2012.[22][31]
For the 2014–15 season, Westphal was hired by the Brooklyn Nets as an assistant to new head coach Lionel Hollins.[32] Hollins had previously served as Westphal's assistant coach in Phoenix. When the Nets fired Hollins in January 2016, Westphal left the team.[33]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Westphal
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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The last known widow of a Civil War veteran has passed away... 155+ years after the end of the war, and not surprisingly 101 years after she was born.

  Helen Viola Jackson, when seventeen years old, married a 93-year-old widower, a veteran of the Missouri Cavalry (the part of Missouri on the Union side), in 1936. He promised her a veteran's pension that would ease her life during the Great Depression.  He died in 1939, and she lived 81 years after he died. 

The last known widow of a Confederate veteran died in 2008.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Yeah, a 17-year old marrying a 93-year old would not be considered very “woke” nowadays.
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Thomas Charles Lasorda (September 22, 1927 – January 7, 2021) was an American professional baseball pitchercoach, and manager. He managed the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1976 through 1996. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame as a manager in 1997.

Lasorda played in MLB for the Dodgers in 1954 and 1955 and for the Kansas City Athletics in 1956. He coached for the Dodgers from 1973 through 1976 before taking over as manager. Lasorda won two World Series championships as manager of the Dodgers and was named the National League's Manager of the Year twice. The Dodgers retired his uniform number in his honor.

Lasorda became the Los Angeles Dodgers manager September 29, 1976, upon Alston's retirement.[1] He managed the final four games of the 1976 season.[20] Lasorda compiled a 1,599–1,439 record as Dodgers manager, won two World Series championships in (1981 and 1988), four National League pennants, and eight division titles in his 20-year career as the Dodgers manager.[21] His 16 wins in 30 NL Championship games managed were the most of any manager at the time of his retirement. His 61 postseason games managed ranks fourth all-time behind Bobby CoxCasey Stengel (all of whose games took place during the World Series in baseball's pre-divisional play days), and Joe Torre. He also managed in four All-Star games.[22]


Lasorda managed nine players who won the National League Rookie of the Year award. The winners came in two strings of consecutive players. From 1979 to 1982, he managed Rick SutcliffeSteve HoweFernando Valenzuela, and Steve Sax. From 1992 to 1995, he managed Eric KarrosMike PiazzaRaúl Mondesí, and Hideo Nomo.[14] Before retiring during the 1996 season, he had also managed that year's rookie of the year, Todd Hollandsworth.[23]

Lasorda's final game was a 4–3 victory over the Houston Astros, at Dodger Stadium, on June 23, 1996. The following day (June 24), he drove himself to the hospital complaining of abdominal pains, and in fact he was having a heart attack. He officially retired on July 29, 1996.[14] His 1,599 career wins ranks 22nd all-time in MLB history, at the time of his death.[22]

[Image: 95px-Lasorda2retired.svg.png]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Willie Mays is now the oldest living member of the Baseball Hall of fame. He turns 90 on May 6.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(01-09-2021, 01:17 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:

Thomas Charles Lasorda (September 22, 1927 – January 7, 2021) was an American professional baseball pitchercoach, and manager. He managed the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1976 through 1996. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame as a manager in 1997.

Lasorda played in MLB for the Dodgers in 1954 and 1955 and for the Kansas City Athletics in 1956. He coached for the Dodgers from 1973 through 1976 before taking over as manager. Lasorda won two World Series championships as manager of the Dodgers and was named the National League's Manager of the Year twice. The Dodgers retired his uniform number in his honor.

Lasorda became the Los Angeles Dodgers manager September 29, 1976, upon Alston's retirement.[1] He managed the final four games of the 1976 season.[20] Lasorda compiled a 1,599–1,439 record as Dodgers manager, won two World Series championships in (1981 and 1988), four National League pennants, and eight division titles in his 20-year career as the Dodgers manager.[21] His 16 wins in 30 NL Championship games managed were the most of any manager at the time of his retirement. His 61 postseason games managed ranks fourth all-time behind Bobby CoxCasey Stengel (all of whose games took place during the World Series in baseball's pre-divisional play days), and Joe Torre. He also managed in four All-Star games.[22]


Lasorda managed nine players who won the National League Rookie of the Year award. The winners came in two strings of consecutive players. From 1979 to 1982, he managed Rick SutcliffeSteve HoweFernando Valenzuela, and Steve Sax. From 1992 to 1995, he managed Eric KarrosMike PiazzaRaúl Mondesí, and Hideo Nomo.[14] Before retiring during the 1996 season, he had also managed that year's rookie of the year, Todd Hollandsworth.[23]

Lasorda's final game was a 4–3 victory over the Houston Astros, at Dodger Stadium, on June 23, 1996. The following day (June 24), he drove himself to the hospital complaining of abdominal pains, and in fact he was having a heart attack. He officially retired on July 29, 1996.[14] His 1,599 career wins ranks 22nd all-time in MLB history, at the time of his death.[22]

[Image: 95px-Lasorda2retired.svg.png]
Ed Bruce, 81, county singer, songwriter and actor best known for the iconic song “Manas Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys”.  While his own version of the song made the country Top 20, when Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson got hold of it two years later it went to the top of the charts for four weeks. Another of his songs, “Texas(When I Die)” was a big hit for Tanya Tucker.  Mr. Bruce began his career with Sun Records, notable for launching the careers of Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash. He had a sting of country hits during the 1980s with his biggest hit being “You’re the Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had”.  When his music career began to wane in the late 1980s he turned to acting, starring in a remake of the Maverick TV series alongside James Garner.  In 2018 he was inducted into the Arkansas Music Hall of Fame.
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(01-09-2021, 01:28 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Willie Mays is now the oldest living member of the Baseball Hall of fame.  He turns 90 on May 6.

It's still kind of amazing that he's not still out there playing. I saw him hit his 400th home run, which was followed by home runs by Willie McCovey and Orlando Cepeda (August 27, 1963). Time sure goes by fast. That's one reason I can't really believe that we only have one life, and that if it all just ends, it is a tale told by an idiot signifying nothing, as Shakespeare wrote.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Diana Claire Millay (June 7, 1935 – January 8, 2021) was an American actress. She was best known for her work in television, having guest starred in close to one hundred prime time shows, both live and filmed, and for playing continuing roles on two daytime soap operas, Dark Shadows and The Secret Storm.

Millay was born in Rye, New York[1] and started her career as a model, first as a child for the Montgomery Ward catalogue, and later as a top Conover model for John Robert Powers.

Every year during high school summer vacation, she appeared in summer stock productions, playing leading or featured roles in classic stage plays such as Our Hearts Were Young and GayThe Girl on the Via FlaminiaCome Back, Little ShebaTime of the CuckooThe Seven Year Itch,[2] Ladies in RetirementBell, Book and CandleTime Out for GingerPicnicThe Little FoxesTobacco RoadLife With Father and many more. In total, she appeared in seven seasons of summer stock.

Broadway


In 1957, Broadway came calling and Millay starred opposite Sam Levene and Ellen Burstyn in Fair Game.[3] Her subsequent Broadway appearances include Drink to Me Only[4] opposite Tom PostonRoger the Sixth opposite Alan Alda, The Glass Rooster opposite Michael Allinson and Boeing Boeing[4] opposite Ian Carmichael. In addition, she spent a year touring the United States and Canada opposite Eddie Bracken in The Seven Year Itch.
Millay's first film role was in the 1957 United Artists movie Street of Sinners, opposite George Montgomery.[5]

Television

Her television debut came on an episode of the anthology series Star Tonight.[6] After that, one of Millay's early roles on television was being the timekeeper on Masquerade Party in 1956.[7] She began her extensive television career when she guest starred on Star Tonight in an episode entitled "Taste". She continued to appear in other "live" productions such as Robert Montgomery PresentsKraft Television TheatreStudio OneU.S. Steel HourOmnibusPond's TheatrePhilco Television PlayhousePlayhouse 90, and many others. She made three guest appearances on the CBS courtroom drama series Perry Mason, starring Raymond Burr. In 1961 she played Debra Bradford in "The Case of the Resolute Reformer," and title character and defendant Sue Ellen Frazer in "The Case of the Unwelcome Bride." In 1963 she played murder victim Eula Johnson in "The Case of the Bouncing Boomerang."

Her filmed television credits include guest star roles on most of the major shows that were running during the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s, including Stagecoach WestFather Knows BestThe Tab Hunter ShowMy Three SonsThe AmericansGunsmokeBonanzaThe VirginianArrest and Trial77 Sunset StripRawhideTales of Wells FargoWagon TrainLaramieRoute 66Hawaiian EyeThe RiflemanThrillerMaverick (in the episode "Dodge City or Bust" with Jack Kelly and a brief appearance by Roger Moore), The Life and Legend of Wyatt EarpDobie GillisSam Peckinpah's The WesternerPerry Mason, and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.. Millay made three television pilots for prospective new television series, Slezak and SonBoston Terrier, and Las Vegas Beat.
In 1962, she was chosen as "Miss Emmy" because of her extensive appearances on primetime TV shows.[8]

Dark Shadows

After completing Paramount's Tarzan and the Great River opposite Mike Henry and Jan Murray that was shot in Brazil,[9][10] executive producer Dan Curtis offered her the contract role of "Laura Collins" on his ABC-TV daytime series, the cult classic Dark Shadows in November 1966.[11] She went on to appear in sixty-two episodes,[12] and became the show's first supernatural character, playing an immortal phoenix-woman who is burned in a fire and reborn to spend another century on Earth. After her present day incarnation was again consumed in a fire, she returned during the flashback story which took place in the 19th century, as yet another reincarnation of "Laura Collins". She appeared in a feature film inspired by the series, MGM's 1971 Night of Dark Shadows opposite David Selby.[10][13]
In 1970, Millay was offered a daytime role as "Kitty Styles" on the CBS soap The Secret Storm. Her run on this show gave her the opportunity to work once again with former Dark Shadows alumni Robert Costello, who was a producer on both shows, and Joel Crothers who played "Joe Haskell" on Dark Shadows and "Ken Stevens" on The Secret Storm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Millay
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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William Edwin (Ed) Bruce Jr. (December 29, 1939 – January 8, 2021) was an American country music songwriter, singer, and actor. He was known for writing the 1975 song "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys" and recording the 1982 country number one hit "You're the Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had". He also co-starred in the television series Bret Maverick with James Garner during the 1981-1982 season.

Bruce was born in KeiserArkansas, United States, and grew up in Memphis, Tennessee. In 1957, at the age of 17, he went to see Jack Clement, a recording engineer for Sun Records. Bruce caught the attention of Sun owner Sam Phillips, for whom he wrote and recorded "Rock Boppin' Baby" (as "Edwin Bruce").



In the early 1960s, Bruce recorded for RCA and some smaller labels like Wand/Scepter, singing rockabilly music, as well as more pop-oriented material such as "See the Big Man Cry." In 1962, he wrote "Save Your Kisses" for pop star Tommy Roe and in 1963 he reached No. 109 on the Billboard "Bubbling Under" chart with his own recording of "See the Big Man Cry" (Wand 140), both published by Bill Justis at Tuneville Music. Charlie Louvin recorded "See the Big Man Cry" (Capitol 5369) in 1965; Louvin's version reached No. 7 on the Billboard "Country Singles" chart. During his career many songs that Bruce wrote and recorded were more successful when re-recorded by others.

In 1966, Bruce returned to RCA and recorded "Puzzles", "The Price I Pay to Stay" and "Lonesome Is Me". He scored his first charted single with "Walker's Woods" in 1967, and also charted with his version of The Monkees' "Last Train to Clarksville." Both of these singles were minor hits. In 1969, Bruce signed with Monument Records, where he continued to have minor successes with "Everybody Wants To Get To Heaven" and "Song For Jenny".



Bruce wrote "The Man That Turned My Mama On" which became a major hit for Tanya Tucker in 1974, as was his "Restless" for Crystal Gayle the same year. He signed with United Artists Records in 1973 and released several singles, but only one single in 1974 became a minor hit. Bruce finally made the Top 20 on country charts with his version of "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys", a song he wrote with then-wife Patsy Bruce, in 1976.

Two more Top 40 hits followed for Bruce in 1976, and in 1977, he signed with Epic Records where he would score minor hits. In 1978, "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow up to Be Cowboys" was recorded by Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. It became a major hit, and continued the upward swing in Bruce's career. In 1979, Tanya Tucker took Bruce's 1977 song "Texas (When I Die)" into the country Top 5.



In 1980, Bruce signed with MCA Records, where he would score his biggest successes. His early hits with MCA included "Diane", "The Last Cowboy Song", "When You Fall In Love (Everything's A Waltz)", "Evil Angel", and "Love's Found You And Me". His biggest hit, "You're the Best Break This Old Heart Ever Had" went to number one on the country chart in 1982. This was also Bruce's first Top 10 hit as a singer after 15 years. He had other hit songs that made the Top 10 like "Ever, Never Lovin' You"; "My First Taste of Texas"; and "After All".

In 1984, Bruce returned to RCA Records and scored a No. 3 hit with "You Turn Me On Like A Radio" in 1985. His last Top 10 single was "Nights" in 1986 and his last Top 40 single (and last chart single to date) was "Quietly Crazy" in 1987.



Bruce supplemented his songwriting income doing voice-overs for television and radio commercials.[1] After the 1986 album entitled Night Things and a 1988 self-titled follow-up, Bruce made a conscious decision to cut back on his music to focus on his acting career, appearing in several made-for-TV films.[1] He hosted two shows in the late 1980s, Truckin' USA and American Sports Cavalcade.[2] He had the second lead on the television revival of 1957's Maverick, called Bret Maverick. Starring James Garner as a legendary western gambler, the series ran on NBC-TV during the 1981-82 season. Bruce played the irascibly surly town lawman who found himself reluctantly co-owning a saloon with Maverick, with whom he seemed to maintain a surreally adversarial relationship more or less throughout the entire season. Bruce sang and wrote the theme song to the show,[3] while Garner himself sang the same song over the end titles at the show's close, while being relentlessly interrupted by network announcements about upcoming programming.


Bruce appeared in several theatrical cinematic releases, including Fire Down Below with Steven Seagal.[3]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Sheldon Adelson, casino magnate and super-donor to the Trump campaign



Sheldon Adelson, GOP Megadonor Who Founded Las Vegas Sands, Dies
The casino mogul, whose billions gave him enormous influence with President Donald Trump and other Republican politicians, was 87.


[Image: 5c1213e23c0000b1050f1724.jpeg?ops=100_100]
By Lydia O’Connor


heldon Adelson, a billionaire casino magnate whose huge political donations made him a top influence on the Republican Party and President Donald Trump, has died. He was 87.

Adelson was the founder and CEO of the Las Vegas Sands Corp., which announced his death Tuesday from complications related to treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. 

Adelson was 17th on the Forbes 400 list of the richest Americans in 2020, with a fortune estimated at $26.8 billion.



He lavished political contributions on Republican politicians and was Trump’s largest donor. He famously made the largest single donation to any U.S. presidential inauguration ― a sum of $5 million ― to Trump’s inaugural committee. 



He and his wife, Miriam, pumped at least $205 million into campaign and party committees and super PACs to support Republican politicians over the 2016 and 2018 election cycles, according to Federal Election Commission records. The nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks money in U.S. elections, reported in October that the Adelsons had set a new record for donations from individuals in a single election cycle, giving $172.7 million to Republican candidates.

In a last-ditch effort to reelect Trump in the 2020 election, the Adelsons gave $75 million to the super PAC Preserve America, which aimed to attack Joe Biden. Biden went on to win the election.



Adelson didn’t back Trump in the 2016 GOP primary ― his pick was Newt Gingrich. But he sank millions into Trump’s general election campaign. Since then, he has shown enormous influence on Trump’s policies, including scrapping the Iran nuclear deal and moving the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem.


In February 2017 ― weeks after Trump took office ― Adelson met with the president, ProPublica reported. A day later, Trump met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The president stunned the Japanese leader by asking his government to approve Adelson’s bid for a Japan casino, according to the report, which cited two people present at the meeting.

The Adelsons also contributed $500,000 to a legal defense fund set up for Trump and his associates being investigated by special counsel Robert Mueller.

Trump awarded Miriam Adelson a Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2018.


https://www.huffpost.com/entry/sheldon-adelson-gop-megadonor-dead_n_5c783781e4b033abd14a1223

comment: he did much to promote a monster, and I do not refer to gambling.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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