Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Obituaries
I guess her wife will carry on Sheldon's evil ways.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Siegfried of "Siegfried and Roy", the survivor of the pair of magicians who used Big Cats as props. He was 81.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Harvey Phillip Spector (December 26, 1939 – January 16, 2021) was an American record producer, musician, and songwriter who developed the Wall of Sound, a music production formula he described as a Wagnerian approach to rock and roll. Spector is regarded to be among the most influential figures in pop music history[1] and as the first auteur of the music industry for the unprecedented control he had over every phase of the recording process.[2] After spending three decades in semi-retirement, in 2009, he was convicted for the 2003 murder of the actress Lana Clarkson.[3] At the time of his death, he was serving a prison sentence of 19 years to life.[4][5]
Born in the Bronx, Spector began his career in 1958 as co-founder, guitarist, and vocalist of the Teddy Bears, penning their US number-one single "To Know Him Is to Love Him". In 1960, he co-founded Philles Records, and at the age of 21, became the youngest ever US label owner to that point.[6] Throughout the 1960s, he wrote, co-wrote, or produced records for acts such as the Ronettesthe Crystals, and Ike & Tina Turner. He typically collaborated with arranger Jack Nitzsche, engineer Larry Levine, and a de facto house band that later became known as "the Wrecking Crew". Spector initially retired from the music industry in 1966.

In 1969, Spector returned to his career and subsequently produced the Beatles' album Let It Be (1970), as well as several solo records by the band's John Lennon and George Harrison. By the mid-1970s, Spector had produced eighteen US Top 10 singles for various artists, but following work with Leonard CohenDion DiMucci, and the Ramones, he remained largely inactive and affected by personal struggles.[7] His chart-toppers included "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" (co-written and produced for the Righteous Brothers, 1964), "The Long and Winding Road" (produced for the Beatles, 1970), and "My Sweet Lord" (produced for Harrison, 1970). According to BMI, "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" is the song that received the most US airplay in the 20th century.[8]
Dubbed the "First Tycoon of Teen",

[size=x-small]FOOTNOTEWilliams2003[httpsbooksgooglecombooksidvyyVGNycEA0CpgPT5_5]-9][9]
[10] Spector's records helped engender the role of the studio as an instrument,[11] the integration of pop art aesthetics into music (art pop),[12] and the art rock genre.-13][13] His multi-artist compilation album A Christmas Gift for You from Philles Records (1963) is widely considered to be the finest Christmas record of all time.[14] Spector's honors include the 1973 Grammy Award for Album of the Year for co-producing Harrison's Concert for Bangladesh (1971), a 1989 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and a 1997 induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.[15] In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked Spector number 63 on their list of the greatest artists in history.[16]

Spector died in prison on January 16, 2021 due to complications from COVID-19.[17]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_Spector
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
a hero of Chernobyl:



Nikolay Timofeyevich Antoshkin (Russian: Николай Тимофеевич Антошкин; December 19, 1942 – January 17, 2021) was a retired Mokshan[1] Russian Air Force colonel generalHero of the Soviet Union and politician. Born in 1942 in Bashkortostan, Antoshkin was drafted into the Soviet Army in August 1961. After graduating from military aviation school, he served with reconnaissance aviation units. He became commander of the Air Force of the 20th Guards Army in May 1980. After graduation from the Military Academy of the General Staff, Antoshkin became commander of the Air Force and deputy commander of the Central Group of Forces.

In March 1985, he became chief of staff of the Air Force of the Kyiv Military District. In this role, he supervised the initial Chernobyl helicopter cleanup operations.[2] For his actions, Antoshkin was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union. He later commanded the Air Forces of the Central Asian Military District and Moscow Military District. Between 1993 and 1997 Antoshkin led Russian Air Force Frontal Aviation. In 1997 he became head of Air Force combat training and retired a year later. Antoshkin was elected a deputy of the State Duma in 2014.[3] He was affiliated with United Russia.

Antoshkin was born on 19 December 1942 in the village of Kuzminovka in the Bashkir Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic. Between 1950 and 1951 he lived in the village of Kholmogorovka. In 1951, he moved to Kumertau. Antoshkin graduated from tenth grade in 1960. He worked as a worker in the repair and construction workshop and physical education instructor at the Kumertau Power Plant between 1960 and 1961.[3]



Antoshkin was drafted into the Soviet Army in August 1961. He was sent to the Orenburg Higher Military Aviation School, graduating in 1965. Antoshkin was promoted to lieutenant on 29 October 1965. He became a pilot, squadron chief of staff and flight leader in a separate reconnaissance aviation regiment in the Belorussian Military District. He was promoted to senior lieutenant on 6 December 1967. Between 1969 and 1970 he was a flight commander in a separate reconnaissance aviation regiment in the Far Eastern Military District. He received the rank of captain on 30 December 1969. Antoshkin graduated from the Gagarin Air Force Academy in 1973. On 29 June he was promoted to major. He became a squadron commander and deputy commander of a training reconnaissance aviation regiment in the Odessa Military District. Between September 1975 and June 1979 Antoshkin led the 87th Separate Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment in the Turkestan Military District. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 19 September 1975. On 22 February 1977, Antoshkin was awarded the Order for Service to the Homeland in the Armed Forces of the USSR 3rd class. During March 1979 the regiment conducted reconnaissance missions over Afghan territory. In June 1979 he was transferred to command the 11th Separate Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment in the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany. On 27 December, Antoshkin was promoted to colonel. He became commander of the Air Force of the 20th Guards Army in May 1980. After graduating from the Military Academy of the General Staff in 1983, Antoshkin was appointed commander of the Air Force of the Central Group of Forces and deputy commander of the group.[3]



In March 1985, Antoshkin became chief of staff of the Air Force of the Kyiv Military District. On 29 April, he was promoted to major general. Immediately after the Chernobyl disaster, Antoshkin carried out a helicopter flyby of the plant on 26 April 1986. Antoshkin organized and led the helicopter group tasked with dropping sand onto the crater of the reactor[5] until 5 May, by which time the fire had been contained.[6] For his leadership, he was awarded the title Hero of the Soviet Union and the Order of Lenin on 24 December 1986. In August 1988 he was transferred to become commander of the Air Force of the Central Asian Military District at Almaty. In November 1989 he became commander of the Air Force of the Moscow Military District. He was promoted to lieutenant general on 25 April 1990. On 28 November 1991 he was awarded the Order for Service to the Homeland in the Armed Forces of the USSR 2nd class. From November 1993 to March 1997 Antoshkin led Russian Air Force Frontal aviation. He was promoted to colonel general on 10 June 1994. On 28 August 1995 he received the Order "For Merit to the Fatherland" 4th class. In 1996 he was made an honorary citizen of Kumertau. Between November 1997 and September 1998 he was deputy commander of the Air Force for combat training and head of Air Force combat training. Antoshkin became an honorary citizen of Mordovia around this time. He retired in September 1998.[3]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nikolay_Antoshkin
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
pitcher Don Sutton

Donald Howard Sutton (April 2, 1945 – January 18, 2021) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 23 seasons as a member of the Los Angeles DodgersHouston AstrosMilwaukee BrewersOakland Athletics, and California Angels.[1] Sutton won a total of 324 games, 58 of them shutouts with five of them one-hitters and 10 two-hitters, seven of which were shutouts, and he is seventh on baseball's all-time strikeout list with 3,574.


Sutton was born in Clio, Alabama. He attended high school and community college in Florida before entering professional baseball. After a year in the minor leagues, Sutton joined the Dodgers. Beginning in 1966, he was in the team's starting pitching rotation with Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale, and Claude Osteen. Sixteen of Sutton's 23 MLB seasons were spent with the Dodgers. He registered only one 20-win season, but earned 10 or more wins in every season except 1983 and 1988.

Sutton became a television sports broadcaster after his retirement as a player. He worked in this capacity for several teams, the majority being with the Atlanta Braves. Sutton was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998.[2]

After playing for the Sioux Falls Packers in South Dakota, Sutton entered the major leagues at the age of 21. Sutton's major league debut came with the Dodgers on April 14, 1966, the same day that future 300-game winner Greg Maddux was born.[13] On the 1966 Dodgers, Sutton was the fourth starting pitcher in a rotation that included Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale and Claude Osteen.[14] He struck out 209 batters that season, which was the highest strikeout total for a rookie since 1911.[2]


[Image: 220px-1971_Ticketron_Don_Sutton.jpg]

Sutton was selected to the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_All-Star_Game]Major League Baseball All-Star Game
 four times in the 1970s.[15] The 1974 Dodgers made the postseason after winning 102 games during the regular season. They beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in the playoffs and Sutton accounted for two of the team's three wins.[16] They lost the 1974 World Series four games to one, with Sutton earning the only win for the team.[17] In 1976, Sutton had his best major league season, finishing the year with a 21–10 win-loss record.[18] He was the National League's starting pitcher and MVP of the 1977 All-Star game at Yankee Stadium. He earned a complete game win in the 1977 playoffs, followed by a 1–0 record in two appearances in that year's World Series, which the team lost to the Yankees.[1]

In August 1978, Sutton captured media attention after a physical altercation with teammate Steve Garvey. Sutton had criticized what he thought was excessive media attention paid to Garvey, saying that Reggie Smith was really the team's best player. When Garvey confronted Sutton about the comments before a game against the Mets, the men came to blows and had to be separated by teammates and team officials.[19] The team returned to the postseason that year. Sutton had a 15–11 record during the regular season, but he struggled in the postseason as the Dodgers lost the World Series to New York again. In 17 postseason innings that year, Sutton gave up 14 earned runs.[1]

Los Angeles made Sutton a free agent after the 1980 season. During his time in Los Angeles, he set a team record for career wins.[18] Sutton joined the Houston Astros in 1981. After the baseball strike interrupted the season, Sutton returned with seven wins and one loss. In an October 2 loss to the Dodgers, Sutton left the game with a patellar fracture, ending his season just as the Astros were about to clinch a berth in the NL postseason.[20]

Late in the 1982 season, the Astros sent Sutton to the Milwaukee Brewers for Kevin BassFrank DiPino and Mike Madden.[21] Astros player Ray Knight was critical of the trade, saying, "My first reaction to this trade is disbelief. I don't know who are the prospects we are getting, but I would think Don Sutton would bring a big name, a real big name. Here's a guy who is going to win you 15–20 games every year, and he never misses a start... He should really help the Brewers."[22] Sutton earned a win in a 1982 playoff game against the Angels, then started two games in the 1982 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. He pitched 10 innings in the series, gave up nine earned runs and was charged with one loss.[1]

In 1985, Sutton was traded to the Oakland Athletics in exchange for Ray Burris. He was reluctant to report to the team, as he was hoping to play for a team in Southern California so that he could live at home with his family. Sutton ultimately reported to Oakland 12 days late for spring training. He said that he had his family's approval in the decision and he mentioned his win total – he was 20 wins shy of 300 career wins – as a factor in the decision.[23] After starting the season with a 13–8 record, Sutton was traded to the California Angels in September. In return, the Angels would send two minor league players to be named later to Oakland.[18]

[Image: 95px-LAret20.PNG]
Don Sutton's number 20 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998.




Coming into the 1986 season, Sutton had 295 career victories. He struggled early in the season, but earned his 300th career win on June 18 that year, pitching a complete game against the Texas Rangers in which he allowed only three hits and one run while striking out Gary Ward for the final out of the game.[24] He appeared in two games in the 1986 ALCS against the Red Sox, earning a 1.86 ERA but registering two no-decisions.[1]



Sutton finished his career where he'd started it, signing with the Dodgers again in 1988. After spending 15 straight years with Los Angeles from 1966 to 1980, Sutton had pitched for five different teams in his last eight seasons. Before the 1988 season began, Angels pitcher John Candelaria criticized him for tipping off police that Candelaria was drinking the previous year, leading to one of Candelaria's two 1987 drunk driving arrests. Sutton said that he made the report out of concern for Candelaria's safety; Candelaria said that Sutton was practicing "self-preservation" and attempting to have Candelaria removed from the Angels' starting rotation since Sutton was not pitching well.[25]



In August 1988, Sutton spoke with Astros team leadership about a vacant assistant general manager position with the team. Dodgers executive vice president Fred Claire said that Sutton violated league rules by discussing such a position while under contract with a team, but Sutton said that he ran into Astros general manager Bill Wood at a game and simply mentioned his willingness to discuss the position later.[26] The team released him on August 10. Claire said that Sutton's stamina was a major consideration in the move, as the team was looking for pitchers who could last more than five or six innings per start.[27]



Sutton has the record for most at-bats without a home run (1,354). Sutton holds another record: seven times in his career, he pitched nine scoreless innings but got a no-decision. He also holds the major league record for most consecutive losses to one team, having lost 13 straight games to the Chicago Cubs.[28] At the time of his death, he held the franchise record for most wins (233) and strikeouts (2,696) as a Dodger.[29]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
(01-20-2021, 02:45 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: pitcher Don Sutton

Donald Howard Sutton (April 2, 1945 – January 18, 2021) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 23 seasons as a member of the Los Angeles DodgersHouston AstrosMilwaukee BrewersOakland Athletics, and California Angels.[1] Sutton won a total of 324 games, 58 of them shutouts with five of them one-hitters and 10 two-hitters, seven of which were shutouts, and he is seventh on baseball's all-time strikeout list with 3,574.


Sutton was born in Clio, Alabama. He attended high school and community college in Florida before entering professional baseball. After a year in the minor leagues, Sutton joined the Dodgers. Beginning in 1966, he was in the team's starting pitching rotation with Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale, and Claude Osteen. Sixteen of Sutton's 23 MLB seasons were spent with the Dodgers. He registered only one 20-win season, but earned 10 or more wins in every season except 1983 and 1988.

Sutton became a television sports broadcaster after his retirement as a player. He worked in this capacity for several teams, the majority being with the Atlanta Braves. Sutton was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998.[2]

After playing for the Sioux Falls Packers in South Dakota, Sutton entered the major leagues at the age of 21. Sutton's major league debut came with the Dodgers on April 14, 1966, the same day that future 300-game winner Greg Maddux was born.[13] On the 1966 Dodgers, Sutton was the fourth starting pitcher in a rotation that included Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale and Claude Osteen.[14] He struck out 209 batters that season, which was the highest strikeout total for a rookie since 1911.[2]


[Image: 220px-1971_Ticketron_Don_Sutton.jpg]

Sutton was selected to the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_All-Star_Game]Major League Baseball All-Star Game
 four times in the 1970s.[15] The 1974 Dodgers made the postseason after winning 102 games during the regular season. They beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in the playoffs and Sutton accounted for two of the team's three wins.[16] They lost the 1974 World Series four games to one, with Sutton earning the only win for the team.[17] In 1976, Sutton had his best major league season, finishing the year with a 21–10 win-loss record.[18] He was the National League's starting pitcher and MVP of the 1977 All-Star game at Yankee Stadium. He earned a complete game win in the 1977 playoffs, followed by a 1–0 record in two appearances in that year's World Series, which the team lost to the Yankees.[1]

In August 1978, Sutton captured media attention after a physical altercation with teammate Steve Garvey. Sutton had criticized what he thought was excessive media attention paid to Garvey, saying that Reggie Smith was really the team's best player. When Garvey confronted Sutton about the comments before a game against the Mets, the men came to blows and had to be separated by teammates and team officials.[19] The team returned to the postseason that year. Sutton had a 15–11 record during the regular season, but he struggled in the postseason as the Dodgers lost the World Series to New York again. In 17 postseason innings that year, Sutton gave up 14 earned runs.[1]

Los Angeles made Sutton a free agent after the 1980 season. During his time in Los Angeles, he set a team record for career wins.[18] Sutton joined the Houston Astros in 1981. After the baseball strike interrupted the season, Sutton returned with seven wins and one loss. In an October 2 loss to the Dodgers, Sutton left the game with a patellar fracture, ending his season just as the Astros were about to clinch a berth in the NL postseason.[20]

Late in the 1982 season, the Astros sent Sutton to the Milwaukee Brewers for Kevin BassFrank DiPino and Mike Madden.[21] Astros player Ray Knight was critical of the trade, saying, "My first reaction to this trade is disbelief. I don't know who are the prospects we are getting, but I would think Don Sutton would bring a big name, a real big name. Here's a guy who is going to win you 15–20 games every year, and he never misses a start... He should really help the Brewers."[22] Sutton earned a win in a 1982 playoff game against the Angels, then started two games in the 1982 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. He pitched 10 innings in the series, gave up nine earned runs and was charged with one loss.[1]

In 1985, Sutton was traded to the Oakland Athletics in exchange for Ray Burris. He was reluctant to report to the team, as he was hoping to play for a team in Southern California so that he could live at home with his family. Sutton ultimately reported to Oakland 12 days late for spring training. He said that he had his family's approval in the decision and he mentioned his win total – he was 20 wins shy of 300 career wins – as a factor in the decision.[23] After starting the season with a 13–8 record, Sutton was traded to the California Angels in September. In return, the Angels would send two minor league players to be named later to Oakland.[18]

[Image: 95px-LAret20.PNG]
Don Sutton's number 20 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998.




Coming into the 1986 season, Sutton had 295 career victories. He struggled early in the season, but earned his 300th career win on June 18 that year, pitching a complete game against the Texas Rangers in which he allowed only three hits and one run while striking out Gary Ward for the final out of the game.[24] He appeared in two games in the 1986 ALCS against the Red Sox, earning a 1.86 ERA but registering two no-decisions.[1]



Sutton finished his career where he'd started it, signing with the Dodgers again in 1988. After spending 15 straight years with Los Angeles from 1966 to 1980, Sutton had pitched for five different teams in his last eight seasons. Before the 1988 season began, Angels pitcher John Candelaria criticized him for tipping off police that Candelaria was drinking the previous year, leading to one of Candelaria's two 1987 drunk driving arrests. Sutton said that he made the report out of concern for Candelaria's safety; Candelaria said that Sutton was practicing "self-preservation" and attempting to have Candelaria removed from the Angels' starting rotation since Sutton was not pitching well.[25]



In August 1988, Sutton spoke with Astros team leadership about a vacant assistant general manager position with the team. Dodgers executive vice president Fred Claire said that Sutton violated league rules by discussing such a position while under contract with a team, but Sutton said that he ran into Astros general manager Bill Wood at a game and simply mentioned his willingness to discuss the position later.[26] The team released him on August 10. Claire said that Sutton's stamina was a major consideration in the move, as the team was looking for pitchers who could last more than five or six innings per start.[27]



Sutton has the record for most at-bats without a home run (1,354). Sutton holds another record: seven times in his career, he pitched nine scoreless innings but got a no-decision. He also holds the major league record for most consecutive losses to one team, having lost 13 straight games to the Chicago Cubs.[28] At the time of his death, he held the franchise record for most wins (233) and strikeouts (2,696) as a Dodger.[29]
You mentioned how many at bats Don Sutton had. However, pitchers of the future won’t have that opportunity. I believe the DH becomes universal next year. I am actually surprised that the AL/NL split on the issue has lasted as long as it did considering that MLB has been under one umbrella for many years now. With the advent of inter league play in the late 1990s there have been only major league umpires. They used to be separate in each league with separate strike zone boundaries. And each league had it’s own league president. There was though a commissioner over the entire operation which I don’t believe exists today. Universal DH was the name of the game in last year’s COVID shortened season but believe it officially kicks in next year, 2022.
Reply
Henry Louis Aaron (February 5, 1934 – January 22, 2021), nicknamed "Hammer" or "Hammerin' Hank," was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder. He played 21 seasons for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) and two seasons for the Milwaukee Brewers in the American League (AL), from 1954 through 1976. Aaron held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is one of only two players to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times.[2] In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on its "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list.[3] He also later served as the senior vice president of the Atlanta Braves.


Aaron was born and raised in and around Mobile, Alabama. Aaron had seven siblings, including Tommie Aaron, who played major-league baseball with him. He appeared briefly in the Negro American League and in minor league baseball before starting his major league career.[4] By his final MLB season, Aaron was the last Negro league baseball player on a major league roster.

Aaron played the vast majority of his MLB games in right field, though he appeared at several other infield and outfield positions. In his last two seasons, he was primarily a designated hitter.[5] Aaron was an NL All-Star for 20 seasons and an AL All-Star for 1 season, from 1955 through 1975. Aaron holds the record for the most All-Star Game selections (25),[a] and is tied with Willie Mays and Stan Musial for the most All-Star Games played (24). He was a Gold Glove winner for three seasons. In 1957, he was the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) when the Milwaukee Braves won the World Series. He won the NL Player of the Month award in May 1958 and June 1967. Aaron holds the MLB records for the most career runs batted in (RBI) (2,297), extra base hits (1,477), and total bases (6,856). Aaron is also in the top five for career hits (3,771) and runs (2,174). He is one of only four players to have at least 17 seasons with 150 or more hits.[6] Aaron is in second place in home runs (755) and at-bats (12,364), and in third place in games played (3,298). At the time of his retirement, Aaron held most of the game's key career power hitting records.

In 1982, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Since his retirement, Aaron has held front office roles with the Atlanta Braves. In 1988, Aaron was inducted into the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame.[7] In 1999, MLB introduced the Hank Aaron Award to recognize the top offensive players in each league. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2002. He was named a 2010 Georgia Trustee by the Georgia Historical Society in recognition of accomplishments that reflect the ideals of Georgia's founders. Aaron resided near Atlanta.[8]

Much more at Wikipedia. [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hank_Aaron][/url]


[Image: 95px-BravesRetired44.png]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Sammie Nestico, musician

Samuel Louis Nistico (February 6, 1924 – January 17, 2021), better known as Sammy Nestico, was an American composer and arranger. Nestico is best known for his arrangements for the Count Basie orchestra.[4]

Samuel Luigi Nistico was born on February 6, 1924, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Luigi Nistico, an Italian immigrant, and Frances Mangone. His father was a railroad worker. During childhood, Sammy Americanized his name to Samuel Louis Nestico.[5][6] Nestico joined the Oliver High School beginner orchestra in 1937 as a trombonist.[7] In 1939, he wrote his first arrangement. At age 17, Nestico joined the ABC radio station WCAE in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as a trombonist.[7][8][9][10]

During World War II, Nestico joined the US Army and served for five years. After leaving the military, he completed a degree in music education at Duquesne University. His alma mater later awarded him with an honorary Doctor of Music degree and the Distinguished Alumni award.[11] After earning his degree, Nestico then returned to the military, where he arranged music for the U.S. Air Force Band (1950–1963), as well as leading the Glen Miller Army Air Corps dance band, which would later become known as the Airmen of Note. In 1963, he switched to the Marines and became director and arranger of the U.S. Marine Band, where he served under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. During his tenure, a composition by Nestico led President Johnson to remark "You call this music?" In 2009, Nestico said in an interview "I didn't answer, although I didn't think [Johnson's] concept of music was worth a damn."[7][12]

After leaving the military, Nestico became a freelance arranger, working especially with the Count Basie Orchestra in 1968, where he composed, arranged, and conducted the last ten albums by Count Basie, four of which earned Grammy Awards. During his long career, he composed, arranged, or conducted albums for several major stars, including Quincy JonesPhil CollinsBarbra StreisandMichael BubleNatalie ColeSarah VaughanToni TennilleFrank SinatraBing Crosby, and many others. In addition, he played trombone, in the big bands of Tommy DorseyWoody HermanGene Krupa, and Charlie Barnet. He conducted and recorded his arrangements with several leading European Radio Jazz Orchestras, including the BBC Big Band in London, Germany's SWR Big Band and NDR Big Band and the DR Big Band, as well as the Boston Pops Orchestra in America.[7][12][13][14][15]
Nestico had a long career in the film and television industry. As orchestrator, he worked on nearly seventy television programs, including Mission: Impossible[14]MannixM*A*S*H[16]Charlie's Angels[17], and The Mod Squad.[18] He also worked as an arranger for the 81st Academy Awards, as well as some Grammy Awards. He worked as an orchestrator and arranger for the film The Color Purple.[19] Nestico composed commercial jingles for Anheuser-BuschZenithFord Motor CompanyMattel ToysPittsburgh Paint, the National GuardDodge, Remington Bank, and Americard.[15]
In the late 1960s, Sammy worked as an arranger and orchestrator for Capitol Records. In a partnership with Billy May, Nestico was involved in the transcription, arranging, and re-recording of 630 big band songs originally recorded in the 1930s and 1940s. This effort eventually resulted in the release of 63 albums by Time Life.[7][10]

Beginning in 1982, Nestico began releasing solo albums, with Dark Orchid" as his debut album. His solo albums eventually earned him four Grammy Award nominations, besides the awards he earned with Count Basie: in 2002 for his album This Is The Moment and for the arrangement "Kiji Takes A Ride"; in 2009 for his album Fun Time; and in 2016 for his arragement "Good 'Swing' Wenceslas".[7][20]

Nestico also had a career in music education, teaching at the University of Georgia from 1998 to 1999, where he taught orchestration and conducted the studio orchestra; after which he retired to Carlsbad, California, near San Diego. He wrote hundreds of arrangements for school band and jazz band programs. He wrote many books, including The Complete Arranger, first published in 1993, and has since been revised and published in at least four languages. His autobiography, The Gift of Music, was published in 2009. At the time of his death, a feature-length documentary film titled Shadow Man: The Sammy Nestico Story was in production.[7][15]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Bob Avian (December 26, 1937 – January 21, 2021) was an American choreographer, theatrical producer and director.


Born in New York City to an Armenian family[1]in December 1937, Avian spent his early career dividing his time between dancing in such Broadway shows as West Side StoryFunny Girl, and Henry, Sweet Henry and working as a production assistant on projects like I Do! I Do! and Twigs. He first met Michael Bennett when they both appeared in the European tour of West Side Story in 1959, and over the course of the next two decades the two collaborated on Promises, PromisesCocoCompanyFolliesSeesawGod's FavoriteA Chorus LineBallroom, and Dreamgirls, Avian's first credit as a solo producer. Additional Broadway credits include Putting It TogetherNowhere to Go But Up and the 2006 revival of A Chorus Line, which he directed.

In London's West End, Avian choreographed FolliesMartin GuerreThe Witches of EastwickMiss Saigon, and Sunset Boulevard, repeating the assignment for the Broadway productions of the latter two. He also staged Hey, Mr. Producer!, the Cameron Mackintosh tribute.

Avian was openly gay and survived by his husband Peter Pileski, and his sister, Laura Nabedian.[2]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Jimmie Rodgers, pop singer from the 1960's and 1970's

James Frederick Rodgers (September 18, 1933 – January 18, 2021)[1] was an American singer. Rodgers had a run of hits and mainstream popularity in the 1950s and 1960s. His string of crossover singles ranked highly on the Billboard Pop SinglesHot Country and Western Sides, and Hot Rhythm and Blues Sides charts; in the 1960s, Rodgers had more modest successes with adult contemporary music.
He is not directly related to the earlier country singer Jimmie C. Rodgers, who died the same year the younger Rodgers was born. Among country audiences, and in his official songwriting credits, the younger Rodgers is often known as Jimmie F. Rodgers to differentiate the two.

Rodgers was born in Camas, Washington,[2] the second son of Archie and Mary Rodgers.[3] He was taught music by his mother, a piano teacher,[4] and began performing as a child, first entertaining at a Christmas show when he was only five.[2] He learned to play the piano and guitar, and performed locally. After attending Camas High School, and briefly taking courses at Vancouver Clark Junior College,[3] he went to work in a paper mill; although he loved music, he was uncertain whether he could turn it into a career. He was subsequently drafted into the United States Air Force during the Korean War.[5] While in the military, he joined a band called "The Melodies" started by violinist Phil Clark. During his service, he was transferred to Nashville, where he was stationed at Seward Air Force Base from 1954-1956.[6] It was during this time that he began expanding his musical repertoire. And while he was in Nashville, he first heard the song that would become his first hit, Honeycomb.[5]

Like a number of other entertainers of the era, he was one of the contestants on Arthur Godfrey's talent show on CBS television; he won $700.[7] When Hugo Peretti and Luigi Creatore left RCA Victor for Morris Levy's company, Roulette Records, they became aware of Rodgers' talent and signed him up.

In the summer of 1957, he recorded his own version of "Honeycomb", which had been written by Bob Merrill and recorded by Georgie Shaw three years earlier.[8] The tune was Rodgers' biggest hit, staying on the top of the charts for four weeks. It sold over one million copies,[9] and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA.[10] Over the following year he had a number of other hits that reached the Top 10 on the charts: "Kisses Sweeter than Wine", "Oh-Oh, I'm Falling in Love Again", "Secretly", and "Are You Really Mine". Other hits include "Bo Diddley", "Bimbombey", "Ring-a-ling-a-lario", "Tucumcari", "Tender Love and Care (T.L.C)", and a version of Waltzing Matilda as a film tie-in with the apocalyptic movie On the Beach.

In the United Kingdom, "Honeycomb" reached number 30 in the UK Singles Chart in November 1957, but "Kisses Sweeter than Wine" climbed to number 7 the following month.[11] Both "Kisses Sweeter than Wine" and "Oh-Oh, I'm Falling in Love Again" were million sellers.[10]

The success of "Honeycomb" earned Rodgers guest appearances on numerous variety programs during 1957, including the "Shower of Stars" program, hosted by Jack Benny, on October 31, 1957,[12] and the Big Record with Patti Page, on December 4, 1957.[13] Rodgers also made several appearances on the Ed Sullivan Show, including on September 8, 1957,[14] and November 3, 1957.[15] In 1958, he appeared on NBC's The Gisele MacKenzie Show. Also in 1958, he sang the opening theme song of the film The Long, Hot Summer, starring Paul NewmanJoanne Woodward and Orson Welles.[16] He then had his own short-lived televised variety show on NBC in 1959.[17]

His biggest hit in the UK was "English Country Garden", a version of the folk song "Country Gardens", which reached number 5 in the chart in June 1962.[11] In 1962, he moved to the Dot label, and four years later to A&M Records. He also appeared in some films, including The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come, opposite Neil Hamilton, and Back Door to Hell, which he helped finance.

In 1966, a long dry spell ended for Rodgers when he re-entered the Top 40 with "It's Over" (later to be recorded by Eddy ArnoldElvis PresleyGlen CampbellMason Williams, and Sonny James). In 1967, he changed record labels, signing with A&M Records.[18] It was with that label that Rodgers had his final charting Top 100 single, "Child of Clay", written by Ernie Maresca, (who had a top-40 hit back in 1962, "Shout! Shout! (Knock Yourself Out)".) [19] He performed the song on several television variety shows, including The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour,[20] but it never became a big hit; it only reached number 31 on the Billboard charts.

On December 1, 1967, Rodgers suffered traumatic head injuries after the car he was driving was stopped by an off-duty police officer near the San Diego Freeway in Los Angeles. He had a fractured skull and required several surgeries.[21] Initial reports in the newspapers attributed his injuries to a severe beating with a blunt instrument by unknown assailants.[22] Rodgers had no specific memory of how he had been injured, remembering only that he had seen blindingly bright lights from a car pulling up behind him.[23]

A few days later, the Los Angeles Police Department stated that off-duty LAPD officer Michael Duffy (at times identified in the press as Richard Duffy) had stopped him for erratic driving, and that Rodgers had stumbled, fallen and hit his head. According to the police version, Duffy then called for assistance from two other officers, and the three of them put the unconscious Rodgers into his car and left the scene.[24] This account was supported by the treating physicians who had first blamed the skull fracture on a beating; by the latter part of December, they concluded that Rodgers had in fact fallen and that had caused his injuries.[25]

The following month, Rodgers filed an $11 million lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles, claiming that the three officers had beaten him.[26] The police and the L.A. County District Attorney rejected these claims, although the three officers (identified in the press as Michael T. Duffy, 27; Raymond V. Whisman, 29, and Ronald D. Wagner, 32)[27] were given two-week suspensions for improper procedures in handling the case, particularly their leaving the injured Rodgers alone in his car. (He was later found by a worried friend.)[28][29] Duffy had had a previous four-day suspension for using unnecessary force; he had used a blackjack on a juvenile.[28][29]

The three officers and the LA Fire and Police Protective League filed a $13 million slander suit against Rodgers for his public statements accusing them of brutality.[30]

Neither suit came to trial; the police slander suit was dropped, and in 1973 Rodgers elected to accept a $200,000 settlement from the Los Angeles City Council, which voted to give him the money rather than to incur the costs and risks of further court action.[31] Rodgers and his supporters still believe that one or more of the police officers beat him, although other observers find the evidence inconclusive.[32] In his 2010 biography Me, the Mob, and the Music, singer Tommy James wrote that Morris Levy, the Mafia-connected head of Roulette Records, had arranged the attack in response to Rodgers' repeated demands for unpaid royalties he was due by the label. All of Rodgers' most successful singles had been released by Roulette, who were notorious for not paying their artists for their record sales.[33]

In 1993, Raymond Virgil Whisman, one of the three officers who were alleged to have assaulted Rodgers, was arrested for assaulting his wife and threatening to kill her. The arrest occurred after sheriff's deputies stormed his house after being informed that he was holding his wife at gunpoint. Deputies found 11 rifles, 4 shotguns, and two handguns in the home. Whisman was charged with two counts of assault and two counts of making terroristic threats.[34]

Recovery from his injuries caused an approximately year-long period in which Rodgers ceased to perform. Meanwhile, his voice was still being heard: several of his earlier hits were used in jingles in the 1970s, one for Spaghetti-Ohs and another for a Honeycomb breakfast cereal.[6] And Rodgers' songs continued to make the Billboard Country and Easy Listening charts until 1979. During the summer of 1969, he made a brief return to network television with a summer variety show [35] on ABC (which later bought the rights to Rodgers' Dot Records releases, now owned by Universal Music Group). It was not until the early 1980s when he began doing some limited live appearances again. Among the earliest was a series of shows in late February 1983: he performed at Harrah's Reno Casino Cabaret.[4] He also performed a few shows in other cities, including at a nightclub called Mister Days in Ft. Lauderdale FL in late 1983.[36]

Rodgers and his first wife Colleen (née McClatchey) divorced in 1970, and she died May 20, 1977.[37] They had two children, Michael and Michelle. He had remarried in 1970, and Jimmie and Trudy Rodgers had two sons, Casey and Logan. He and Trudy divorced in the late 1970s, and he remarried again. Jimmie and Mary Rodgers were still married when he died, and they have a daughter, Katrine, who was born in 1989.
Rodgers appeared in a 1999 video, Rock & Roll Graffiti by American Public Television, along with about 20 other performers. He stated that he had suffered from spasmodic dysphonia for a number of years, and could hardly sing.[38] Nevertheless, he gave "Honeycomb" a try, and he mentioned that he had a show in Branson, Missouri.

In 2010, Rodgers wrote and published his autobiography, Dancing on the Moon: The Jimmie Rodgers Story.[7] Rodgers returned to Camas, Washington in 2011 and 2012, performing to sell-out crowds. After the 2012 concert, he returned home for open heart surgery, following a heart attack three weeks earlier.[citation needed] In 2013, his neighbors successfully got a street named after him, in the neighborhood where he grew up.[38]
Rodgers died on January 18, 2021, at the age of 87.[39][40]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Larry King has passed away.
Reply
radio/TV host Larry King, brainy curmudgeon

Larry King (born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger; November 19, 1933 – January 23, 2021)[2] was an American television host, radio host, and paid spokesman, whose work was recognized with awards including two Peabodys, an Emmy award, and 10 Cable ACE Awards.[3][4][5]

King began as a local Florida journalist and radio interviewer in the 1950s and 1960s, and gained prominence beginning in 1978 as host of The Larry King Show, an all-night nationwide call-in radio program heard on the Mutual Broadcasting System.[6] From 1985 to 2010, he hosted the nightly interview television program Larry King Live on CNN. From 2012 to 2020, he hosted Larry King Now aired on HuluOra TV, and RT America. He continued to host Politicking with Larry King, a weekly political talk show which aired weekly on the same two channels from 2013 until his death in 2021. King received many awards during his life, including several Cable ACE AwardsPeabody Awards and lifetime achievement awards. [3][7]

CBS staff announcer, whom King met by chance, suggested he go to Florida which was a growing media market with openings for inexperienced broadcasters. King went to Miami, and after initial setbacks, he gained his first job in radio. The manager of a small station, WAHR[22] (now WMBM) in Miami Beach, hired him to clean up and perform miscellaneous tasks.[23] When one of the station's announcers abruptly quit, King was put on the air. His first broadcast was on May 1, 1957, working as the disc jockey from 9 a.m. to noon.[24] He also did two afternoon newscasts and a sportscast. He was paid $50 a week.

He acquired the name Larry King when the general manager claimed that Zeiger was too difficult to remember, so minutes before airtime, Larry chose the surname King, which he got from an advertisement in the Miami Herald for King's Wholesale Liquor.[25] Within two years, he legally changed his name to Larry King.[9]



He began to conduct interviews on a mid-morning show for WIOD, at Pumpernik's Restaurant in Miami Beach.[26] He would interview whoever walked in. His first interview was with a waiter at the restaurant.[27] Two days later, singer Bobby Darin, in Miami for a concert that evening, walked into Pumpernik's[28][29] having heard King's radio show; Darin became King's first celebrity interview guest.[30][31]



King's Miami radio show brought him local attention. A few years later, in May 1960, he hosted Miami Undercover, airing Sunday nights at 11:30 p.m. on WPST-TV Channel 10 (now WPLG).[32] On the show, he moderated debates on important local issues of the day.



King credits his success on local television to the assistance of comedian Jackie Gleason, whose national television variety show was being taped in Miami Beach beginning in 1964. "That show really took off because Gleason came to Miami," King said in a 1996 interview he gave when inducted into the Broadcasters' Hall of Fame. "He did that show and stayed all night with me. We stayed till five in the morning. He didn't like the set, so we broke into the general manager's office and changed the set. Gleason changed the set, he changed the lighting, and he became like a mentor of mine."[33]

[/url]

[Image: 170px-Larry_King_mug_shot.jpg]


King's mugshot from his 1971 arrest in Miami





During this period, WIOD gave King further exposure as a color commentator for the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League, during their 1970 season and most of their 1971 season.[34] However, he was dismissed by both WIOD and television station WTVJ as a late-night radio host and sports commentator as of December 20, 1971, when he was arrested after being accused of grand larceny by a former business partner, Louis Wolfson.[35][36] Other staffers covered the Dolphins' games into their 24–3 loss to Dallas in Super Bowl VI. King also lost his weekly column at the Miami Beach Sun newspaper. The charges were dropped.[36] Eventually, King was rehired by WIOD.[36] For several years during the 1970s, he hosted a sports talk-show called "Sports-a-la-King" that featured guests and callers.[30]



The Larry King Show[edit]

[Image: 220px-Vladimir_Putin_with_Larry_King.jpg]


King interviewing Vladimir Putin in 2000



[Image: 220px-Larry_King_interviews_George_W._Bu...a_Bush.jpg]


King interviewing President George W. Bush and First Lady Laura Bush in 2006





On January 30, 1978, King went national on a nightly Mutual Broadcasting System coast-to-coast broadcast,[37] inheriting the talk show slot that had begun with Herb Jepko in 1975, then followed by "Long John" Nebel in 1977, until his illness and death the following year.[38] King's Mutual show rapidly developed a devoted audience.[39]

The Larry King Show was broadcast live Monday through Friday from midnight to 5:30 a.m. Eastern Time. King would interview a guest for the first 90 minutes, with callers asking questions that continued the interview for another 90 minutes. At 3 a.m., the Open Phone America segment began, where he allowed callers to discuss any topic they pleased with him,[39] until the end of the program, when he expressed his own political opinions. Many stations in the western time zones carried the Open Phone America portion of the show live, followed by the guest interview on tape delay.[40]

Some of King's regular callers used pseudonyms or were given nicknames by King, such as "The Numbers Guy",[41] "The Chair", "The Portland Laugher",[39] "The Miami Derelict", and "The Scandal Scooper".[42] The show was successful, starting with relatively few affiliates and eventually growing to more than 500. King hosted the show until stepping down in 1994.[43] King occasionally entertained the audience by telling amusing stories from his youth or early broadcasting career.[44][45]

For its final year, the show was moved to afternoons. After King stepped down, Mutual gave the afternoon slot to David Brenner[46] and Mutual's affiliates were given the option of carrying the audio of King's new CNN evening television program. After Westwood One dissolved Mutual in 1999, the radio simulcast of the CNN show continued until December 31, 2009.[47]



Larry King Live[edit]

[Image: 170px-Larry_King.jpg]


King while hosting Larry King Live in 2006





Larry King Live began on CNN in June 1985 in which King hosted a broad range of guests from controversial figures of UFO conspiracy theories and alleged psychics,[48] to prominent politicians and leading figures in the entertainment industry, often doing their first or only interview on breaking news stories on his show. After doing his CNN show from 9 to 10 p.m., King then travelled to the studios of the Mutual Broadcasting System to do his radio show,[49] when both shows still aired.



Two of his more famous interviews involved political figures. In 1992, billionaire Ross Perot announced his presidential bid on the show. In 1993, a debate between Al Gore and Perot became CNN’s most-watched segment until 2015.[3]

Unlike many interviewers, King had a direct, non-confrontational approach. His reputation for asking easy, open-ended questions made him attractive to important figures who wanted to state their position while avoiding being challenged on contentious topics.[50] King said that when interviewing authors, he did not read their books in advance, so that he would not know more than his audience.[6][49] Throughout his career, King interviewed many of the leading figures of his time. According to CNN, King conducted more than 30,000 interviews in his career.[10]

King also wrote a regular newspaper column in USA Today for almost 20 years, from shortly after that first national newspaper's debut in Baltimore-Washington in 1982 until September 2001.[51] The column consisted of short "plugs, superlatives and dropped names" but was dropped when the newspaper redesigned its "Life" section.[52] The column was resurrected in blog form in November 2008[53] and on Twitter in April 2009.[54]







On June 29, 2010, King announced that after 25 years, he would be stepping down as the show's host. However, he stated that he would remain with CNN to host occasional specials.[55] The announcement came in the wake of speculation that CNN had approached Piers Morgan, the British television personality and journalist, as King's primetime replacement,[56] which was confirmed that September.[57][58]

The final edition of Larry King Live aired on December 16, 2010.[59] The show concluded with his last thoughts and a thank you to his audience for watching and supporting him over the years. The concluding words of Larry King on the show were, "I... I, I don't know what to say except to you, my audience, thank you. And instead of goodbye, how about so long."[60]



On February 17, 2012, CNN announced that he would no longer host specials.[61]








In March 2012, King co-founded Ora TV, a production company, with Mexican business magnate Carlos Slim. On January 16, 2013, Ora TV celebrated their 100th episode of Larry King Now. In September 2017, King stated that he had no intention of ever retiring and expected to host his programs until he died.[62]

Ora TV signed a multi-year deal with Hulu to exclusively carry King's new talk-oriented web series, Larry King Now, beginning July 17.[63] On October 23, 2012, King hosted the third-party presidential debate on Ora TV, featuring Jill SteinRocky AndersonVirgil Goode, and Gary Johnson.[64]

In May 2013, the Russian-owned RT America network announced that they struck a deal with Ora TV to host the Larry King Now show on its network. King said in an advertisement on RT America: "I would rather ask questions to people in positions of power, instead of speaking on their behalf." The show continued to be available on Hulu.com and Ora.tv.[65][66] The following month, RT America began airing Larry King's new Thursday evening political talk show Politicking with Larry King, beginning with a discussion between Representative Aaron Schock (R, Illinois), Democratic Political Strategist Peter Fenn and Politico's Deputy Managing Editor Rachel Smolkin about Edward Snowden's leak scandal that revealed secret NSA surveillance programs.[67]

When criticized for doing business with a Russian-owned TV network in 2014, King responded, "I don't work for RT", commenting that his podcasts, Larry King Now and Politicking, are licensed for a fee to RT America by New York-based Ora TV. "It’s a deal made between the companies ... They just license our shows. If they took something out, I would never do it. It would be bad if they tried to edit out things. I wouldn’t put up with it."[68]



Other ventures[edit]

[Image: 220px-LarryKingSept10_%28cropped%29.jpg]


King attending a ceremony for Bill Maher to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in September 2010





Larry King remained active as a writer and television personality.

King guest starred in episodes of Arthur30 Rock and Gravity Falls, had cameos in Ghostbusters and Bee Movie, and voiced Doris the Ugly Stepsister in Shrek 2 and its sequels.[5] He also played himself in The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story and appeared as himself in an episode of Law and Order: Trial by Jury.

King hosted the educational television series In View with Larry King from 2013 to 2015, which was carried on cable television networks including Fox Business Network and Discovery[69] and produced by The Profiles Series production company.[70]

King and his wife Shawn appeared on WWE Raw in October 2012, participating in a storyline involving professional wrestlers The Miz and Kofi Kingston.[71]

King became a very active user on the social-networking site Twitter, where he posted thoughts and commented on a wide variety of subjects. King stated, "I love tweeting, I think it's a different world we've entered. When people were calling in, they were calling in to the show and now on Twitter I'm giving out thoughts, opinions. The whole concept has changed."[72]
After 2011, he also made various TV infomercials, often appearing as a "host" discussing products like Omega-3 fatty acid dietary supplement OmegaXL with guests, in an interview style reminiscent of his past TV programs.[73][74][75][url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_King#cite_note-75]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
George Edward "ChiefArmstrong (July 6, 1930 – January 24, 2021)[1] was a former Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played 21 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Toronto Maple Leafs. He played 1,188 NHL games between 1950 and 1971, all with Toronto and a franchise record, and was the team's captain for 13 seasons. Armstrong was a member of four Stanley Cup championship teams and played in seven NHL All-Star Games. He scored the final goal of the NHL's "Original Six" era as Toronto won the 1967 Stanley Cup.

Armstrong played both junior and senior hockey in the Toronto Marlboros organization and was a member of the 1950 Allan Cup winning team as senior champions of Canada. He returned to the Marlboros following his playing career and coached the junior team to two Memorial Cup championships. He served as a scout for the Quebec Nordiques, as an assistant general manager of the Maple Leafs and for part of the 1988–89 NHL season as Toronto's head coach. Armstrong was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1975 and the Maple Leafs honoured his uniform number 10 in 1998, and later officially retired the number, along with ten others, during a pre-game ceremony on October 15, 2016.

Upon turning professional in 1950–51, Armstrong was assigned to Toronto's American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Pittsburgh Hornets.[11] In 71 games for Pittsburgh, he recorded 15 goals and 48 points.[9] Despite being hampered by hand and wrist injuries suffered in fights, Armstrong was the AHL's leading goal scorer and stood second in points by mid-season in 1951–52.[12] He was recalled to Toronto during the season and scored his first NHL goal, against goaltender Gerry McNeil of the Montreal Canadiens. It was the first goal ever scored by a player with Native heritage.[13] He finished the season with three goals and three assists in 20 games with Toronto.[9]

Though he missed the start of the 1952–53 season due to a separated shoulder, Armstrong earned a permanent spot on the Maple Leafs' roster.[3] He quietly established himself as an important contributor for Toronto by recording 25 points that season, then scoring 32 points the following season and 28 in 1954–55.[14] A 48-point season in 1955–56 was second on the team to Tod Sloan's 66. Armstrong then led the Maple Leafs in scoring with 44 points in 1956–57 despite missing 14 of his team's games.[15] He was named to play in the NHL All-Star Game in both seasons. They were the first two of seven he ultimately played.[7]
[Image: 170px-Chex_Photo_George_Armstrong.JPG]

The Maple Leafs named Armstrong the team's captain in 1957–58 as he succeeded Ted Kennedy and Jim Thomson who served as co-captains the season before.[16] He finished fourth in team scoring with 42 points, then played his third All-Star Game during the 1958–59 season.[7] He recorded four assists in the playoffs as the Maple Leafs reached the 1959 Stanley Cup Final, but lost to the Montreal Canadiens.[9][17] With 51 points in 1959–60, Armstrong finished one behind Bob Pulford for the team lead.[18] Toronto again reached the Stanley Cup Final where they were again eliminated by Montreal.[19]
The Maple Leafs finally reached the NHL's peak two seasons later.[3] Armstrong set a career high with 53 points in the 1961–62 regular season, then added 12 points in 12 playoff games for Toronto.[9] He started the play that resulted in the Stanley Cup clinching goal, rushing the puck up ice before passing to Tim Horton, who then passed to goal-scorer Dick Duff that capped off a 2–1 victory in the sixth and deciding game of the series against the Chicago Black Hawks.[20] As Maple Leafs captain, Armstrong was presented the trophy by league president Clarence Campbell.[3] It was the first of three consecutive championships for Toronto as the Maple Leafs of 1962–1964 became the fourth dynasty in NHL history.[21] Individually, Armstrong scored 21, 19 and 20 goals over the three seasons and by virtue of the NHL's All-Star Game format of the time that had the defending champion play the all-stars of the remaining teams, appeared in his fourthfifth and sixth All-Star Games.[7] Early in the 1963–64 season, on December 1, 1963, Armstrong scored his 200th career NHL goal.[22]
A 37-point season followed in 1964–65, then 51 points the 1965–66 season.[9] By 1966–67, Armstrong led an aging Maple Leafs team that entered the playoffs as an underdog against a dominant Chicago team. The Maple leafs nonetheless eliminated the Black Hawks in six games to set up the 1967 Stanley Cup Final against Montreal. The Canadiens were so confident of victory that a display area for the Stanley Cup had been set up at the Quebec pavilion at Expo 67 prior to the series' start.[23] The Maple Leafs dashed Montreal's hopes by winning the championship in six games. Armstrong scored the final goal of the series in a 3–1 victory in the deciding contest.[24] It was also the last goal scored in the NHL's "Original Six" era as the league was set to double in size to 12 teams for the 1967–68 season.[7]
[Image: 170px-George_Armstrong_action_photo.jpg]

Armstrong with the Maple Leafs during the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1970%E2%80%9371_NHL_season]1970–71 season. He retired at the end of that season.

Armstrong announced his intention to retire as a player following the championship but changed his mind and returned for another season.[25] The Maple Leafs placed him on their protected list for the 1967 Expansion Draft, and he remained with Toronto.[26] He played in his seventh All-Star Game in 1968 and finished the season with 34 points.[7] Retiring following the season before changing his mind became an annual event for Armstrong as he announced his intention to leave the game in five straight years.[27] He remained a consistent scorer for Toronto, recording 27, 28 and 25 points in his following three seasons.[9] He finally ended his playing career after the 1970–71 season to take an office position in the Maple Leafs.,[27] and also he finished his career with two hundred and ninety-six goals, four goals away from obtaining three  hundred.[28]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Armstrong_(ice_hockey)
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
(01-20-2021, 02:45 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: pitcher Don Sutton

Donald Howard Sutton (April 2, 1945 – January 18, 2021) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 23 seasons as a member of the Los Angeles DodgersHouston AstrosMilwaukee BrewersOakland Athletics, and California Angels.[1] Sutton won a total of 324 games, 58 of them shutouts with five of them one-hitters and 10 two-hitters, seven of which were shutouts, and he is seventh on baseball's all-time strikeout list with 3,574.


Sutton was born in Clio, Alabama. He attended high school and community college in Florida before entering professional baseball. After a year in the minor leagues, Sutton joined the Dodgers. Beginning in 1966, he was in the team's starting pitching rotation with Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale, and Claude Osteen. Sixteen of Sutton's 23 MLB seasons were spent with the Dodgers. He registered only one 20-win season, but earned 10 or more wins in every season except 1983 and 1988.

Sutton became a television sports broadcaster after his retirement as a player. He worked in this capacity for several teams, the majority being with the Atlanta Braves. Sutton was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998.[2]

After playing for the Sioux Falls Packers in South Dakota, Sutton entered the major leagues at the age of 21. Sutton's major league debut came with the Dodgers on April 14, 1966, the same day that future 300-game winner Greg Maddux was born.[13] On the 1966 Dodgers, Sutton was the fourth starting pitcher in a rotation that included Sandy KoufaxDon Drysdale and Claude Osteen.[14] He struck out 209 batters that season, which was the highest strikeout total for a rookie since 1911.[2]


[Image: 220px-1971_Ticketron_Don_Sutton.jpg]

Sutton was selected to the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_League_Baseball_All-Star_Game]Major League Baseball All-Star Game
 four times in the 1970s.[15] The 1974 Dodgers made the postseason after winning 102 games during the regular season. They beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in the playoffs and Sutton accounted for two of the team's three wins.[16] They lost the 1974 World Series four games to one, with Sutton earning the only win for the team.[17] In 1976, Sutton had his best major league season, finishing the year with a 21–10 win-loss record.[18] He was the National League's starting pitcher and MVP of the 1977 All-Star game at Yankee Stadium. He earned a complete game win in the 1977 playoffs, followed by a 1–0 record in two appearances in that year's World Series, which the team lost to the Yankees.[1]

In August 1978, Sutton captured media attention after a physical altercation with teammate Steve Garvey. Sutton had criticized what he thought was excessive media attention paid to Garvey, saying that Reggie Smith was really the team's best player. When Garvey confronted Sutton about the comments before a game against the Mets, the men came to blows and had to be separated by teammates and team officials.[19] The team returned to the postseason that year. Sutton had a 15–11 record during the regular season, but he struggled in the postseason as the Dodgers lost the World Series to New York again. In 17 postseason innings that year, Sutton gave up 14 earned runs.[1]

Los Angeles made Sutton a free agent after the 1980 season. During his time in Los Angeles, he set a team record for career wins.[18] Sutton joined the Houston Astros in 1981. After the baseball strike interrupted the season, Sutton returned with seven wins and one loss. In an October 2 loss to the Dodgers, Sutton left the game with a patellar fracture, ending his season just as the Astros were about to clinch a berth in the NL postseason.[20]

Late in the 1982 season, the Astros sent Sutton to the Milwaukee Brewers for Kevin BassFrank DiPino and Mike Madden.[21] Astros player Ray Knight was critical of the trade, saying, "My first reaction to this trade is disbelief. I don't know who are the prospects we are getting, but I would think Don Sutton would bring a big name, a real big name. Here's a guy who is going to win you 15–20 games every year, and he never misses a start... He should really help the Brewers."[22] Sutton earned a win in a 1982 playoff game against the Angels, then started two games in the 1982 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. He pitched 10 innings in the series, gave up nine earned runs and was charged with one loss.[1]

In 1985, Sutton was traded to the Oakland Athletics in exchange for Ray Burris. He was reluctant to report to the team, as he was hoping to play for a team in Southern California so that he could live at home with his family. Sutton ultimately reported to Oakland 12 days late for spring training. He said that he had his family's approval in the decision and he mentioned his win total – he was 20 wins shy of 300 career wins – as a factor in the decision.[23] After starting the season with a 13–8 record, Sutton was traded to the California Angels in September. In return, the Angels would send two minor league players to be named later to Oakland.[18]

[Image: 95px-LAret20.PNG]
Don Sutton's number 20 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1998.




Coming into the 1986 season, Sutton had 295 career victories. He struggled early in the season, but earned his 300th career win on June 18 that year, pitching a complete game against the Texas Rangers in which he allowed only three hits and one run while striking out Gary Ward for the final out of the game.[24] He appeared in two games in the 1986 ALCS against the Red Sox, earning a 1.86 ERA but registering two no-decisions.[1]



Sutton finished his career where he'd started it, signing with the Dodgers again in 1988. After spending 15 straight years with Los Angeles from 1966 to 1980, Sutton had pitched for five different teams in his last eight seasons. Before the 1988 season began, Angels pitcher John Candelaria criticized him for tipping off police that Candelaria was drinking the previous year, leading to one of Candelaria's two 1987 drunk driving arrests. Sutton said that he made the report out of concern for Candelaria's safety; Candelaria said that Sutton was practicing "self-preservation" and attempting to have Candelaria removed from the Angels' starting rotation since Sutton was not pitching well.[25]



In August 1988, Sutton spoke with Astros team leadership about a vacant assistant general manager position with the team. Dodgers executive vice president Fred Claire said that Sutton violated league rules by discussing such a position while under contract with a team, but Sutton said that he ran into Astros general manager Bill Wood at a game and simply mentioned his willingness to discuss the position later.[26] The team released him on August 10. Claire said that Sutton's stamina was a major consideration in the move, as the team was looking for pitchers who could last more than five or six innings per start.[27]



Sutton has the record for most at-bats without a home run (1,354). Sutton holds another record: seven times in his career, he pitched nine scoreless innings but got a no-decision. He also holds the major league record for most consecutive losses to one team, having lost 13 straight games to the Chicago Cubs.[28] At the time of his death, he held the franchise record for most wins (233) and strikeouts (2,696) as a Dodger.[29]

He became a celebrity in Los Angeles in the mid-1970s, making several appearances as a panelist on Match Game on CBS-TV.

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/sutton-don
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
No relation. Sounds interesting, though.

Arik Brauer (Hebrew: אריק בראואר‎; 4 January 1929 – 24 January 2021) was an Austrian painter, printmaker, poet, dancer, singer, and stage designer. He resided in Vienna and Ein Hod, Israel. Brauer was a co-founder of the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism, together with Ernst FuchsRudolf HausnerFritz JanschkaWolfgang Hutter and Anton Lehmden.

Born in Vienna, Austria, Erich "Arik" Brauer was the child of Lithuanian Jewish emigrants. His post-war artistic training was in Vienna, under the supervision of Albert Paris von Gütersloh. Gütersloh promoted Brauer's work within the Vienna School of Fantastic Realism circle of artists, which had formed in the mid-1950s from a post-1946 Viennese surrealist group that had included Brauer along with Edgar JenéErnst FuchsWolfgang HutterRudolf HausnerAnton Lehmden, and Fritz Janschka. Despite the prevailing art-world taste for abstraction in the 1950s and early 1960s, Brauer's work successfully blended high craftsmanship and surrealism in ways that gained him international attention. In 1982, he had breakthrough solo shows in the United States.

Brauer also designed architectural projects in Austria and Israel. The façades and interiors of his buildings are covered with fantastical mosaics, murals and painted tiles. He also designed the first United Buddy Bear for Austria in 2002.

[Image: 220px-Wien_-_Arik-Brauer-Haus_%282%29.JPG]

Among his works are:
His daughter is jazz singer Timna Brauer.

[Image: 220px-Arik_Brauer%2C_Vienna_2009_a.jpg]

Arik Brauer in 2009
  • City of Vienna Prize for Visual Arts (1979)

  • [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austrian_Cross_of_Honour_for_Science_and_Art]Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art, (1st class) (2002)[1]

  • Golden Medal of Honour for Services to the City of Vienna (2011)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arik_Brauer
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
re Larry King: had I been in his activity I would have modeled myself upon him.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
(01-26-2021, 03:29 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: re Larry King: had I been in his activity I would have modeled myself upon him.

I was in his activity, and he was an inspiring model, among others, for me.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Cloris Leachman (April 30, 1926 – January 26, 2021) was an American actress and comedian, whose career spanned over seven decades. She won various accolades, including eight Primetime Emmy Awards from 22 nominations, making her the most nominated and, along with Julia Louis-Dreyfus, most awarded actress in Emmy history. In addition, she has won an Academy Award, a British Academy Film Award, a Golden Globe Award, and a Daytime Emmy Award.


Born and raised in Des MoinesIowa, Leachman attended Northwestern University and began appearing in local plays as a teenager. After competing in the 1946 Miss America pageant, she secured a scholarship to study under Elia Kazan at the Actors Studio in New York City, making her professional debut in 1948. Her breakthrough role was the nosy and cunning landlady Phyllis Lindstrom in the landmark CBS sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970–75), for which she won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series in 1974 and 1975; its spin-off, Phyllis (1975–77), earned her the Golden Globe Award for Best TV Actress – Musical or Comedy.

In film, she appeared in Peter Bogdanovich's The Last Picture Show (1971) as the jaded wife of a closeted schoolteacher in the 1950s; she won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress and the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her performance, and the film is widely considered to be one of the greatest of all time. Additionally, she was part of Mel Brooks's ensemble cast, appearing in roles such as Frau Blücher in Young Frankenstein (1974) and Madame Defarge in History of the World, Part I (1981).

Leachman won additional Emmys for the television film A Brand New Life (1973); the variety sketch show Cher (1975); the ABC serial The Woman Who Willed a Miracle (1983); and the television shows Promised Land (1998) and Malcolm in the Middle (2001–06). Her other notable film and television credits include The Twilight Zone (1961; 2003), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), WUSA (1970), Yesterday (1981), the English-language dub of the Studio Ghibli's Castle in the Sky (1998), Spanglish (2004), and Mrs. Harris (2005). Leachman released her autobiography in 2009, and continued to act in occasional roles.

Leachman was born in Des Moines, Iowa, the eldest of three daughters. She attended Theodore Roosevelt High School. Her parents were Cloris (née Wallace) and Berkeley Claiborne "Buck" Leachman. Her father worked at the family-owned Leachman Lumber Company.[1][2][3][4]

Her youngest sister, Mary, was not in show business. Middle sister Claiborne Cary was an actress and singer.[5] Their maternal grandmother was of Bohemian (Czech) descent.[6]

As a teenager, Leachman appeared in plays by local youth on weekends at Drake University in Des Moines.[7] After graduating from high school, she enrolled at Northwestern University in the School of Education.[8] At Northwestern, she became a member of Gamma Phi Beta and was a classmate of future comic actors Paul Lynde and Charlotte Rae. She began appearing on television and in films shortly after competing in Miss America in 1946.

After winning a scholarship in the Miss America pageant, placing in the top 16, Leachman studied acting under Elia Kazan at the Actors Studio in New York City. She had been cast as a replacement for the role of Nellie Forbush during the original run of Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific. A few years later, she appeared in the Broadway-bound production of William Inge's Come Back, Little Sheba, but left the show before it reached Broadway when Katharine Hepburn asked her to co-star in a production of William Shakespeare's As You Like It.[9] Leachman was slated to play the role of Abigail Williams in the original Broadway cast of Arthur Miller's seminal drama The Crucible. The production played four preview performances at the Playhouse Theatre in Wilmington, DE from January 15 – 17, 1953, prior to opening on Broadway on January 22. However, Leachman left the production the day before opening night in Wilmington, with Madeleine Sherwood assuming the role. Leachman's name was heavily publicized prior to the production's opening, and her name still appeared in the printed program; a sign appeared at the box office in Wilmington noting the change.[10]

[Image: 220px-Lassie_1957_cast_photo.JPG]

Leachman appeared in many live television broadcasts in the 1950s, including such programs as Suspense and Studio One. She made her feature-film debut as an extra in Carnegie Hall (1947), but had her first real role in Robert Aldrich's film noir classic Kiss Me Deadly,[11] released in 1955. Leachman was several months pregnant during the filming, and appears in one scene running down a darkened highway wearing only a trench coat. A year later, she appeared opposite Paul Newman and Lee Marvin in The Rack (1956). She appeared with Newman again in a brief role in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969).

She continued to work mainly in television, with appearances in Rawhide and in The Twilight Zone episode "It's a Good Life", as well as the sequel "It's Still a Good Life" in the 2002–2003 UPN series revival. During this period, Leachman appeared opposite John Forsythe on the popular anthology Alfred Hitchcock Presents in an episode titled "Premonition". She later appeared as Ruth MartinTimmy Martin's adoptive mother, in the last half of season four (1957) of LassieJon Provost, who played Timmy, said, "Cloris did not feel particularly challenged by the role. Basically, when she realized that all she'd be doing was baking cookies, she wanted out."[12] She was replaced by June Lockhart in 1958.

That same year, she appeared in an episode of One Step Beyond titled "The Dark Room", in which she portrayed an American photographer living in Paris. In 1960, she played Marilyn Parker, the roommate of Janice Rule's character, Elena Nardos, in the Checkmate episode "The Mask of Vengeance". In 1966, she guest-starred on Perry Mason as Gloria Shine in "The Case of the Crafty Kidnapper". In late 1970, Leachman starred in one episode of That Girl as Don Hollinger's sister, Sandy.

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Cloris did a "real good" performance in "It's A Good Life," an excellent portrayal of how we have to defer to the every whim of bosses who hold the power, whether in companies, non-profits, or in countries like the USA under Trump, or Russia under Putin, etc.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
I was thinking of Josef Stalin, except with no more remarkable magic than a bullet to the back of the head of the 'very bad man' that he wanted to disappear into the cornfield. Maybe so was Rod Serling.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)