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Obituaries
"Three minutes to Wapner!" -- not any more.


Joseph Wapner, the retired judge who literally changed television as the judge on "The People's Court," has died ... TMZ has learned.

Wapner became an instant sensation when the show debuted in September, 1981. "The People's Court" was the first TV reality show, and it opened the door to many more, including a slew of TV court shows.

He was opinionated, passionate and irascible as he heard thousands of cases during his 12-year run.

The show became a touchpoint for pop culture. It was parodied on "Saturday Night Live" and many other shows. Dustin Hoffman's "3 minutes to


Wapner" in "Rain Man" became an iconic expression.

Before becoming a TV judge, Wapner served as an L.A. County Superior Court judge for 20 years.

He was hospitalized last week with breathing problems and his condition worsened, to the point he was taken to his West L.A. home Friday under hospice care. He died Sunday morning.

Judge Wapner was married to wife Mickey for 70 years. He had 3 kids.

Joseph Wapner was 97.

http://www.tmz.com/2017/02/26/joseph-wap...les-court/
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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RlP Bill Paxton from Aliens & Titantic Sad
Heart  Sherrod/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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Who knew that the theme to People's Court was over four minutes long? (Parts of it would fit nicely into a 70s blaxploitation score.)
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Game over, man! Game over!

You forgot Bill Paxton in Twister.
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(02-27-2017, 10:09 AM)Bad Dog Wrote: Game over, man! Game over!

You forgot Bill Paxton in Twister.

-- didn't see that one
Heart  Sherrod/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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GULF BREEZE, Fla.

Mississippi editor Stanley Dearman, who pushed for justice in the murders of three civil rights workers, died on Saturday in Florida. The death of the 84-year-old was announced by the newspaper in Philadelphia, Mississippi, that he once published.

Dearman wrote articles and editorials in The Neshoba Democrat that helped lead to conviction of a former Klansman in the 1964 killings. His funeral and burial will be Tuesday in Philadelphia.

The civil rights workers — Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael "Mickey" Schwerner — disappeared on June 21, 1964. A deputy sheriff in Philadelphia had arrested them on a traffic charge and released them, but not before alerting a mob. Their bodies were dug up 44 days later under a dam, after Mississippi's then-governor claimed their disappearance was a hoax.

The murders inspired the 1988 film "Mississippi Burning."

In 1967, the federal government charged 18 people with depriving the workers of their civil rights. Only seven were convicted.

Dearman purchased the Democrat in 1966 and ran it for 34 years. After his retirement, he became a founding member of the Philadelphia Coalition, a multiracial citizens' group that pushed for further prosecutions in the killings.

"Come hell or high water, it's time for an accounting," Dearman wrote in a 2000 editorial in the Democrat.

Susan Glisson, former head of the University of Mississippi's William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, said Dearman had tears in his eyes as he walked into a 2004 news conference when coalition members first called for justice in the case.

"He said 'I never thought I would live to see this day,'" Glisson wrote in a remembrance on Facebook . "I told him how much he had done to make it happen."

Eventually, Klansman Edgar Ray Killen, who had been charged in the 1967 trial but went free after the jury couldn't come to a verdict, was charged with murder. He was convicted of manslaughter in 2005 by a state court jury — exactly 41 years after the killings. Killen remains confined at the Mississippi State Penitentiary at Parchman.

Dearman told a reporter from The Globe and Mail newspaper in Canada that he was haunted by the case. At the time of the killing, he had been a reporter in nearby Meridian, where Chaney lived and Schwerner had been based.

"More than anything else, it is a personal thing," he told the Canadian newspaper in 2001. "At some point, it entered into my psyche and started working. I don't fully understand it. I have replayed every minute of it."

Dearman said he took up the cause in part because he didn't feel he initially did enough when he bought the Democrat in 1966.

Carolyn Goodman, the mother of Andrew Goodman, came to Philadelphia for Dearman's 2001 retirement party.

"You gave to me and my family an understanding and warmth that we needed so desperately at a time when it seemed our wounds would never be healed," she told Dearman then.

Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/news/politics...rylink=cpy
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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Beloved host of Turner Classic Movies and Oscar historian Robert Osborne died on Monday in New York, according to the cable network. The cause of death was not immediately announced. He was 84.

For more than 23 years, Osborne hosted screenings of classic films such as “Gone with the Wind” and “Vertigo” on TCM, serving as the preeminent expert on all things Hollywood, including films of the golden era and the history of the Academy Awards. He also regularly enlisted A-listers like Carrie Fisher, Drew Barrymore and Alec Baldwin for co-hosting duties and interviews.

“All of us at Turner Classic Movies are deeply saddened by the death of Robert Osborne. Robert was a beloved member of the Turner family for more than 23 years,” TCM general manager Jennifer Dorian said in a statement. “He joined us as an expert on classic film and grew to be our cherished colleague and esteemed ambassador for TCM. Robert was embraced by devoted fans who saw him as a trusted expert and friend. His calming presence, gentlemanly style, encyclopedic knowledge of film history, fervent support for film preservation and highly personal interviewing style all combined to make him a truly world-class host. Robert’s contributions were fundamental in shaping TCM into what it is today and we owe him a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends at this time.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/turn...2buik9&

Those like me who love great old American movies will truly miss him.
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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Kurt Moll (11 April 1938 – 5 March 2017)[1] was a German operatic bass singer who enjoyed an international career and was widely recorded.[2]

His voice was notable for its range, a true infra-bass (or oktavist bass, lower than basso profondo), including full, resonant low and very-low notes with relaxed vibrato; also for its unusual combination of extreme range and a purring, contrabassoon-like timbre.[a][3] Although he had a powerful voice he never performed Wagner's parts Hagen, Hans Sachs, nor Wotan. His interpretations tended to be restrained and intelligent, even in roles like Osmin in Mozart's Die Entführung aus dem Serail and Baron Ochs in Der Rosenkavalier.



Moll was born in Buir, near Cologne, Germany.[2] As a child, he played the cello and hoped to become a great cellist. He also sang in the school choir, the conductor of which encouraged him to concentrate on singing. He studied voice at the Musikhochschule Köln with Emmy Müller. He joined the Cologne Opera at age 20 and remained a member of the ensemble until 1961. He then sang for three years at the Mainz Opera and five years at the Wuppertal Opera. In 1969, he accepted an engagement with the Hamburg State Opera, and then performed in major opera houses of Europe.[4]

He made his debut at the Bayreuth Festival in 1968, Nachtwächter in Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, and sang there for several years Fafner in Der Ring des Nibelungen, Marke in Tristan und Isolde and Pogner in Die Meistersinger.[3]

He made his US debut with the San Francisco Opera as Gurnemanz in Wagner's Parsifal in 1974, a role he reprised with the company in 2000. He made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera on the opening night of the 1977/78 season, appearing as the Landgraf in Wagner's Tannhäuser. He sang there also Rocco in Beethoven's Fidelio and Sparafucile in Verdi's Rigoletto.

He made many recordings of opera, sacred music, and lieder with notable conductors and accompanists. He was awarded several prestigious European record awards; he also won a 1990 Grammy Award for his participation in James Levine's 1988 recording of Wagner's Das Rheingold. Moll can be heard as Ochs in no fewer than seven complete recordings of Der Rosenkavalier, as Sarastro in six recordings of Mozart's Die Zauberflöte, as Marke in six sets of Wagner's Tristan und Isolde, and as the Archangel Raphael in three recordings of Haydn's Die Schöpfung. His recording for the Orfeo label of Schubert's philosophical "Lieder für Bass" set a new standard for these songs. He can be seen in many roles on DVD, including Sarastro (twice), Osmin, the Commendatore in Mozart's Don Giovanni, Bartolo in his Le nozze di Figaro, Hunding in Wagner's Die Walküre (three times), Gurnemanz in his Parsifal, and Ochs (three times).

Kurt Moll retired from the stage in 2006, after singing the Nachtwächter at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich.[3] He gave a master class in January 2011 at Carnegie Hall.[5]

Moll lived in Cologne with his family.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Moll

(Here he is as the Commendatore in Don Giovanni, returning from the dead to give the rake an offer that the rake can neither take nor refuse.... what exquisite drama in my favorite opera, thank you Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Leonardo da Ponte):



"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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Eligio “Kika” de la Garza, II (September 22, 1927 – March 13, 2017) was the Democratic representative for the 15th congressional district of Texas from January 3, 1965, to January 3, 1997.

De la Garza grew up in Mission in Hidalgo County. At the age of seventeen, he entered the United States Navy and served for two years. De la Garza chose to continue his education at Edinburg Junior College and the United States Army Artillery School at Fort Sill in Oklahoma. For two years beginning in 1952, he was a lieutenant in the Army served in the 37th Field Artillery Regiment deployed in the Korean War. After returning home, he completed his law degree at St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio. After having practiced law for several years in the Rio Grande Valley, he was elected to the Texas House of Representatives; he served in the Texas House of Representatives from 1953 to 1965.

While in the state House, de la Garza was famous for sponsoring much legislation in the fields of education and the environment. He authored bills to protect wetlands, create state-sponsored preschools, and more international bridges to Mexico. From 1955 to 1957, he was the only Hispanic member of the Texas House. He was joined in 1957 by a second Mexican American member, Oscar M. Laurel of Laredo, the seat of Webb County.
In 1965, de la Garza, a strong supporter of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson, assumed his seat in Congress. From 1981 to 1994, he was the chairman of the Agricultural Committee, leading the way in passing bills that reorganized the agricultural lending system, the farm insurance system, the United States Department of Agriculture, and pesticide laws.

De la Garza was also a civil rights supporter and called for smoother relations between the U.S. and Mexico. He worked to improve trade between the two nations and was critical in passing the legislation that enacted the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

De la Garza's nickname was made famous by Andy Rooney in the early days of his TV show as he referred to “Kiki de la Garza” as one of the names that stuck with him most. He resided in McAllen, Texas with his wife Lucille until he died on March 13, 2017.[1][2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kika_de_la_Garza
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

Reply
(03-14-2017, 02:46 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Eligio “Kika” de la Garza, II (September 22, 1927 – March 13, 2017) was the Democratic representative for the 15th congressional district of Texas from January 3, 1965, to January 3, 1997.

De la Garza grew up in Mission in Hidalgo County. At the age of seventeen, he entered the United States Navy and served for two years. De la Garza chose to continue his education at Edinburg Junior College and the United States Army Artillery School at Fort Sill in Oklahoma. For two years beginning in 1952, he was a lieutenant in the Army served in the 37th Field Artillery Regiment deployed in the Korean War. After returning home, he completed his law degree at St. Mary's University School of Law in San Antonio. After having practiced law for several years in the Rio Grande Valley, he was elected to the Texas House of Representatives; he served in the Texas House of Representatives from 1953 to 1965.

While in the state House, de la Garza was famous for sponsoring much legislation in the fields of education and the environment. He authored bills to protect wetlands, create state-sponsored preschools, and more international bridges to Mexico. From 1955 to 1957, he was the only Hispanic member of the Texas House. He was joined in 1957 by a second Mexican American member, Oscar M. Laurel of Laredo, the seat of Webb County.
In 1965, de la Garza, a strong supporter of U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson, assumed his seat in Congress. From 1981 to 1994, he was the chairman of the Agricultural Committee, leading the way in passing bills that reorganized the agricultural lending system, the farm insurance system, the United States Department of Agriculture, and pesticide laws.

De la Garza was also a civil rights supporter and called for smoother relations between the U.S. and Mexico. He worked to improve trade between the two nations and was critical in passing the legislation that enacted the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

De la Garza's nickname was made famous by Andy Rooney in the early days of his TV show as he referred to “Kiki de la Garza” as one of the names that stuck with him most. He resided in McAllen, Texas with his wife Lucille until he died on March 13, 2017.[1][2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kika_de_la_Garza

The level-headed Silents continue to depart. And the world descends further and further into chaos.
#Leach2020
#Pence2017
#ProsecuteTreason
#HUAC2.0
#RealNationalism
#NaziPunksFOff


Mark 13:22 - "For there shall rise false Christs and false prophets, and they shall give signs and wonders, to seduce, if possible, also the chosen."


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Chuck Berry (1926-2017)



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He was that old?

Yes.
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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Apparently he was planning to release another album in 2017, his first in 38 years.  http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/c...rs-w445376

A flawed individual, but no one can deny his talent and influence.

Quote:Deep down in Louisiana close to New Orleans,
Way back up in the woods among the evergreens
There stood a log cabin made of earth and wood,
Where lived a country boy named Johnny B. Goode
Who never ever learned to read or write so well,
But he could play a guitar just like a ringing a bell.


Quote:Last time I saw Marie she's waving me good-bye
With hurry home drops on her cheek that trickled from her eye 
Marie is only six years old, information please
Try to put me through to her in Memphis Tennessee

Quote:The engine with blood was sweaty and damp
And brilliantly lit with a brimstone lamp
And imps for fuel was shoveling bones
While the furnace rang with a thousand groans

The boiler was filled with lager beer
The devil himself was the engineer
The passengers were most a motley crew
Some were foreigners and others he knew
Rich men in broadcloth, beggars in rags
Handsome young ladies and wicked old hags

Quote:You know my temperature's risin'
And the jukebox's blowin' a fuse
My hearts beatin' rhythm
And my soul keeps a singing the blues
Roll over Beethoven
And tell Tchaikovsky the news
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One of the founders of the Millennial Saeculum's popular culture, RIP. Sad
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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James Earle "Jimmy" Breslin (October 17, 1928 – March 19, 2017) was an American journalist and author. Until the time of his death, he wrote a column for the New York Daily News Sunday edition. He wrote numerous novels, and columns of his appeared regularly in various newspapers in his hometown of New York City. He served as a regular columnist for the Long Island newspaper Newsday until his retirement on November 2, 2004, though he still published occasional pieces for the paper. He was known for his newspaper columns which offered a sympathetic viewpoint of the working class people of New York City,[1] and was awarded the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary "for columns which consistently champion ordinary citizens".

Breslin was born on October 17, 1928,[2] in Jamaica, New York. His alcoholic father, James Earl Breslin, a piano player, went out one day to buy rolls and never returned. Breslin and his sister, Deirdre, were raised by their mother, Frances (Curtin), a high school teacher and New York City Welfare Department investigator, during the Great Depression.[1][3]

Breslin attended Long Island University from 1948 to 1950. He left without graduating.[4]


Breslin began working for the Long Island Press as a copy boy in the 1940s.[2] After leaving college, he became a columnist. His early columns were attributed to politicians and ordinary people that he chatted with in various watering holes near Queens Borough Hall. Breslin was a columnist for the New York Herald Tribune,[5] the Daily News, the New York Journal American, Newsday, and other venues. When the Sunday supplement of the Tribune was reworked into New York magazine by editor Clay Felker in 1962, Breslin appeared in the new edition, which became "the hottest Sunday read in town."[5]
One of his best known columns was published the day after John F. Kennedy's funeral and focused on the man who had dug the president's grave.[4] The column is indicative of Breslin's style, which often highlights how major events or the actions of those considered "newsworthy" affect the "common man". Breslin's public profile in the 1960s as a regular guy led to a brief stint as a TV pitchman for Piels Beer, including a bar room commercial wherein he intoned in his deep voice: "Piels—it's a good drinkin' beer!"[6]
In 1969, Breslin ran for president of the New York City Council in tandem with Norman Mailer, who was seeking election as mayor, on the unsuccessful independent 51st State ticket advocating secession of the city from the rest of the state. His memorable quote from the experience: "I am mortified to have taken part in a process that required bars to be closed."[7]
[Image: 220px-51st_State_Power_Button.jpg]

Mailer–Breslin campaign button, 1969

Breslin's career as an investigative journalist led him to cultivate ties with various Mafia and criminal elements in the city, not always with positive results. In 1970, he was viciously attacked and beaten at The Suite, a restaurant then owned by Lucchese crime family associate Henry Hill. The attack was carried out by mobster Jimmy Burke, who objected to an article Breslin had written involving another member of the Lucchese family, Paul Vario. Breslin suffered a major concussion and nosebleeding, but survived the ordeal without any permanent injury.[8]

In 1977, at the height of the Son of Sam scare in New York City, the killer, later identified as David Berkowitz, addressed letters to Breslin.[9][10] Excerpts from the letters were published and used later in Spike Lee's film Summer of Sam, which Breslin, portraying himself, bookends.[11] In 2008, the Library of America selected one of Breslin's many Son of Sam articles published in the Daily News for inclusion in its two-century retrospective of American true crime writing.[12]
\
In 1978, Breslin, without significant acting experience, appeared in Joe Brooks' feature film If Ever I See You Again in a main supporting role playing "Mario Marino", the assistant to two Madison Avenue jingle composers.[13][14] Breslin's performance received a Golden Turkey Award nomination for "Worst Performance by a Novelist".[15]
In 1985, he received a George Polk Award for Metropolitan Reporting.[16] In 1986, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.[17]

In 1986, Breslin revealed that Donald Manes, the Borough President of Queens, was involved in a kickback scheme. Manes later committed suicide.[2]

In October 1986, Breslin landed his own twice-weekly late night television show on ABC, Jimmy Breslin's People, in which he was seen interviewing poor New Yorkers at home. Some of them were incarcerated. Because many network affiliates had already had committed to syndicated programming for Breslin's time slot when the new season started a month earlier, Breslin's show was often delayed or preempted altogether; even the network's flagship station WABC pushed it back from its midnight slot to 2 a.m., and would occasionally only air it one night a week. Disgusted, Breslin took out a full-page ad in The New York Times announcing that he was "firing the network" and would be ending the show after its December 20 broadcast (at which time his 13-week contract expired).[18]
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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Chuck Barris, producer of some of the crappiest network TV shows ever (The Gong Show, The Dating Game, The Newlyweds Game), a big contributor to the dumbing-down of American life.
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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George Dallas Green (August 4, 1934 – March 22, 2017) was an American professional baseball pitcher, manager, and executive in Major League Baseball. After playing for the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators, and New York Mets from 1960 through 1967, he went on to manage the Phillies, the New York Yankees, and the Mets. Green managed the Phillies when they won their first World Series title in 1980 over the Kansas City Royals. Green had a losing record both as a pitcher and as a manager. Nonetheless, in 1983, he was inducted into the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame. He achieved notoriety for his blunt manner.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dallas_Green_(baseball)
"Organization cannot make a genius out of an incompetent. On the other hand, disorganization can scarcely fail to result in inefficiency". - Dwight Eisenhower.

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