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Obituaries
Thích Trí Quang (1924 - 8 November 2019) was a Vietnamese Mahayana Buddhist monk best known for his role in leading South Vietnam's Buddhist population during the Buddhist crisis in 1963.

Quang's campaign, in which he exhorted followers to emulate the example of Mahatma Gandhi, saw widespread demonstrations against the government of President Ngô Đình Diệm which, due to the influence of both Diệm's elder brother, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of HuếPierre Martin Ngô Đình Thục, and Diệm's younger brother, Ngô Đình Nhu, mistreated and persecuted the Buddhist majority. The suppression of Buddhists' civil rights and violent crackdowns on demonstrations, along with the self-immolation of at least five Buddhist monks led to a military coup in which Diệm and Nhu were deposed on 1 November 1963 and assassinated the following day.

More at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Holder of what may be the most difficult job in the Vatican:


Quote:Giorgio Corbellini (20 April 1947 – 13 November 2019) was an Italian Roman Catholic prelate, who was the president of the Labour Office of the Apostolic See since his appointment by Pope Benedict XVI on 3 July 2009 until his death. In this position he managed relations with lay workers in the Roman Curia. He previously served as Vice Secretary-General of the Governorate of the Vatican City State.
He entered the seminary in 1958 in Piacenza, where he attended junior high and high school. From 1966 to 1972 he completed the course of philosophy and theology. He was ordained on 10 July 1971 and was incardinated in the diocese of Piacenza. After his ordination he was a pastor and taught religion in schools.
From 1981 to 1985 he completed his university studies in canon law at the Pontifical Lateran University, graduating summa cum laude in utroque iure. He attended the courses in 1982-1985 for acquiring the title of lawyer Rota.
From 1981 to 1984 and then from 1985 he worked in the pastoral activities of the parish of Saint Lucia in Rome. Beginning in September 1993 he was also chaplain of the Ursuline Sisters in Rome, the Daughters of Mary Immaculate of Verona. On 1 October 1985 he entered the service of the Holy See as an officer of the secretary of the Pontifical Commission for the Authentic Interpretation of the Code of Canon Law, now the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts. Beginning on 1 September 1992, he served as Head of Legal Department of the Governorate of Vatican City.[1]
In April 1993, he became Deputy Secretary-General of the Governorate. From February 2005 to February 2006 he was also Acting Director of Economic Services of the Governorate.[1]
He worked in Rome until he was appointed Titular Bishop of Abula and president of the Labour Office of the Apostolic See, replacing Cardinal Francesco Marchisano.[2] Bishop Corbellini also took over Cardinal Marchisano's role as president of the Permanent Commission for the Protection of Historical and Artistic Monuments of the Holy See. He was consecrated as Titular Bishop of Abula on 12 September by Pope Benedict XVI with Cardinals Tarcisio Bertone and William Levada as co-consecrators.
In addition to his duties at the Labour Office, on 11 May 2010 he was appointed president of the Disciplinary Commission of the Roman Curia replacing Cardinal Julián Herranz Casado.[3]
[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Corbellini#cite_note-3][/url]


...in view of the many disclosures of scandal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Corbellini
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Branko Lustig, Croatian Holocaust survivor and film producer:



Branko Lustig (10 June 1932 – 14 November 2019) was a Croatian film producer best known for winning Academy Awards for Best Picture for Schindler's List and Gladiator. He is the only person born in the territory of present-day Croatia to have won two Academy Awards.[2]

Lustig was born in OsijekKingdom of Yugoslavia to a Croatian Jewish family. His father, Mirko, was head-waiter at an Osijek Café Central, and his mother, Vilma, was a housewife. Lustig's grandparents, unlike his parents, were religious and he regularly attended the local synagogue with them.[3][4]

During World War II, as a child he was imprisoned for two years in Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen. Most members of his family perished in the death camps throughout Europe, including his grandmother who was killed in the gas chamber, while his father was killed in Čakovec on 15 March 1945. Lustig's mother survived the Holocaust and was reunited with him after the war.[5] On the day of the liberation, he weighed only 66 pounds (29.94 kg).[3][6] Lustig credited his survival in Auschwitz to a German officer who happened to be from the same suburb of Osijek as Lustig. He overheard Lustig crying and asked him who his father was. It turned out the officer had known Lustig's father.[7][8]
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Lustig began his film career in 1955 as an assistant director at 
Jadran Film, a state-owned Zagreb-based film production company.[1] In 1956 he worked as a unit production manager on Branko Bauer's World War II drama Ne okreći se sine, winner of three Golden Arena awards at the 1956 Pula Film Festival. Lustig was the location manager for Fiddler on the Roof (1971).[9] In the 1980s Lustig worked on the miniseries The Winds of War (1983) and its sequel War and Remembrance (1988). He moved to the United States in 1988.[1]

Lustig received his first Oscar in 1993 for the production of Schindler's List, a film based on the novel of Thomas Keneally (which is, in turn, based on the true-life story of a German manufacturer who saved hundreds of Jews during World War II). Lustig himself had a cameo early in the film as a nightclub maitre d’. In July 2015, Lustig presented the Oscar to Yad Vashem for eternal safekeeping.[10] He received his second Oscar for the epic movie Gladiator about a struggle for power in Imperial Rome, in 2001. Other major Hollywood films that Lustig worked on as a producer or executive producer include The Peacemaker (1997), Hannibal (2001), and Black Hawk Down (2001). In 2008, Lustig helped establish an independent production company Six Point Films to produce "meaningful, thought-provoking independent films".[9]




Lustig received the Order of Duke Trpimir by President Franjo Tuđman for his work on the film.[1] In 2008 he became the first filmmaker ever and second in the field of arts (only one along with Vladimir Nazor) to be awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Zagreb.[2]


The Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust honored Branko Lustig together with Andreas Maislinger at his 2nd Annual Dinner on 8 November 2009 at the Beverly Hills Hotel for his long-time commitment to Holocaust education and commemoration. Lustig is honorary president and one of the founding members of the Jewish Movie Festival in Zagreb.[11] On 16 September 2010, he was awarded honorary citizenship of Osijek.[12]


Lustig celebrated his bar mitzvah on 2 May 2011 at Auschwitz, in front of barrack No. 24a. He missed his rite of passage as a 13-year-old because at the time he was a prisoner in the very same barrack, having been deported from Osijek when he was ten years old.[4] The bar mitzvah ceremony was held during a March of the Living educational tour of Poland and Israel for high school students.[13]


Lustig resided between Los Angeles and Zagreb, and called both of the cities his home, although in the Jutarnji list interview from September, 2012 he stated: "But more and more, slowly, I am returning to Zagreb. I'm coming back."[14] In the 2017 local elections Lustig was elected member of the Zagreb City Assembly as a candidate of Milan Bandić's party list[15] but eventually did not take his seat.[citation needed]
Lustig died in Zagreb on 14 November 2019, aged 87.[16][17][18][19]




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branko_Lustig








[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branko_Lustig#cite_note-19]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Harrison Dillard, Olympic champion in 1948and 1952:


William Harrison "Bones" Dillard (July 8, 1923 – November 15, 2019) was an American track and field athlete, who is the only male in the history of the Olympic Games to win gold in both the 100 meter (sprints) and the 110 meter hurdles, making him the “World’s Fastest Man” in 1948 and the “World’s Fastest Hurdler” in 1952.

Dillard was born in Cleveland, Ohio on July 8, 1923[3][1] and attended East Technical High School. He entered Baldwin-Wallace College in 1941 and joined Pi Lambda Phi International Fraternity, and two years later was drafted into the U.S. Army serving in the all-black 92nd Infantry Division known as the Buffalo Soldiers.[4] He returned to college in 1946 and resumed athletics, to which he had been inspired by Jesse Owens, who was also from Cleveland and had attended East Technical High School as well. He won the NCAA and AAU 120-yard and 220-yard hurdles in both 1946 and 1947 and he tied world records in both events with a 22.3 in the 220 in 1946 and a 13.6 in the 120.


At the trials for the 1948 Summer Olympics, Dillard failed to qualify for the 110 m hurdles event, but qualified for the 100 m after finishing third.

At the Games, Dillard reached the final, which seemed to end in a dead heat between Dillard and another American, Barney Ewell. The finish photo showed Dillard had won, equalling the World record as well. This was the first use of a photo finish at an Olympic Games.[5] As a member of the 4 × 100 m relay team, he won another gold medal at the London Games.[1]

Four years later, still a strong hurdler, Dillard did qualify for the 110 m hurdles event, and won the event in Helsinki.[3] Another 4 × 100 m relay victory yielded Dillard's fourth Olympic title. Dillard attempted to qualify for a third Olympics in 1956, but failed. Earlier he took part in and won the gold medal in the 110m hurdles at the 1953 Maccabiah Games.[6][7]

Dillard worked for the Cleveland Indians baseball franchise in scouting and public relations capacities, and hosted a radio talk show on Cleveland's WERE. He also worked for the Cleveland City School District for many years as its Business Manager.[1]

Dillard died on November 15, 2019, at the age of 96 from stomach cancer.[8]






https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrison_Dillard
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Werner Gustav Doehner (March 14, 1929 - November 8, 2019) was the last living survivor of the 1937 Zeppelin airship Hindenburg disaster.

Early and later life

Doehner was born in Darmstadt, Germany, and spent his childhood in Mexico City, Mexico, where his father was general manager of Beick, Felix, and Company Pharmaceuticals. He married his wife Ellin, to whom he was married for 52 years, in 1967 in Essen, Germany, who moved with him to Mexico City. In 1984, Doehner, his wife, and son Bernard emigrated to the United States so he could work as an electrical engineer. Doehner was described as a hard-working man, and a devoted family man who worked as an electrical engineer in Mexico, Ecuador, and the United States. He retired from New England Electric System in Westborough, Massachusetts, in 1999.

After retirement, Doehner and his wife lived in Colorado till 2018, when they moved to Laconia, New Hampshire.

Last survivor of the Hindenburg disaster

Doehner, the last living link to the Hindenburg disaster's part of American history, lived his life in relative low profile obscurity. He eventually became historically significant when he was acknowledged as being the last living survivor of the original surviving 62 passengers and crew who jumped from the dirigible's flames on May 6, 1937, at NAS Lakehurst, Lakehurst Borough, New Jersey. The Hindenburg flames and crash killed Doehner's father, sister, and 34 others. Doehner, his parents, older brother and sister were taking a vacation on the Hindenburg from Germany to New Jersey. Doehner finally ended his self-imposed silence in 2017, and told the Associated Press on the 80th anniversary of the Hindenburg disaster that his mother threw him and his older brother out of the ship while it was on fire. His mother then jumped from the flaming Hindenburg to the ground after them. Hydrogen, exposed to air, had triggered an inferno somewhere on the airship, causing flames to flicker atop the airship, which then ignited the airship as it attempted but failed to land.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werner_Doehner

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati...219975002/
Steve Barrera

[A]lthough one would like to change today's world back to the spirit of one hundred years or more ago, it cannot be done. Thus it is important to make the best out of every generation. - Hagakure

Saecular Pages
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She probably revived the court dance of Cambodia after the Khmer Rouge destroyed practically every tradition in Cambodia.

Norodom Buppha Devi (Khmer: នរោត្តម បុប្ផាទេវី pronounced [n̪ɔroːt̪ˈɗɑm ɓupˈpʰaː~ɓopʰaː t̪eːʋiː]; official title Her Royal Highness Samdech Reach Botrei Preah Ream Norodom Buppha Devi, 8 January 1943 – 18 November 2019)[1] was a Cambodian princess and director of the Royal Ballet of Cambodia.[2]

She was the daughter of Norodom Sihanouk and the late Neak Moneang Phat Kanthol, the elder sister of Prince Norodom Ranariddh, and a half-sibling of current King of Cambodia, Norodom Sihamoni.

Buppha Devi finished her high school education at Lycée Preah Norodom in Phnom Penh. As a young princess, her grandmother, Queen Sisowath Kossamak, chose her to become a dancer early in her life.[3] At the age of 15, she became the premiere dancer of the Royal Ballet of Cambodia. At the age of 18, she was granted the title of prima ballerina.[4]


She then toured the world as the principal dancer of the Royal Ballet with Queen Kossamak, performing in public. In the past the ballet had been performed only before royalty to commemorate their dynastic ancestors and to honour the gods.
Buppha Devi served as the Minister of Culture and Fine Arts in Cambodia.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norodom_Buppha_Devi
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Second Officer of the Andrea Doria... maritime disaster of 1956. It was a heroic evacuation of those who survived the collision with the MS Stockholm.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Sir Stephen John Cleobury CBE (/ˈkliːbəri/ KLEE-bər-ee; 31 December 1948 – 22 November 2019[1][2][3]) was an English organist and music director. He worked with the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where he served as music director from 1982 to 2019, and with the BBC Singers.[4] During his long tenure at King's College, with a choir traditionally performing the live broadcast on Christmas Eve by the BBC since 1928, he made the singers even better known by tours and recordings, and introduced the commission of new composition for them, even from 1984 an annual new Christmas carol. Among many honours, he was honorary fellow of the Royal School of Church Music, and was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 2009. In 2019, he was knighted for his contributions to choral music.

Stephen John Cleobury was born in Bromley, Kent, the son of John F. Cleobury and Brenda J. Randall.[5] He sang as a chorister at Worcester Cathedral under Douglas Guest then Christopher Robinson.[5] He was organ scholar at St John's College, Cambridge, under the musical directorship of George Guest, and sub-organist of Westminster Abbey before becoming the first Anglican master of music at the Catholic Westminster Cathedral in 1979.[5][6] In the 1970s, he was head of music at both St Matthew's Church, Northampton, and Northampton Grammar School.[5]

In 1982 he took up the position of director of music for the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where he also taught music.[5] He led the annual Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols at the King's College Chapel on Christmas Eve, which was established in 1918 and broadcast live by the BBC from 1928.[1] In 1984 he began the tradition of an annual new carol composition for the occasion.[2] Among the composers contributing were Thomas AdèsJohn Tavener and Mark-Anthony TurnageHarrison Birtwistle's The Gleam, which requires the choristers to stamp their feet and shout, was received controversially.[6] The Nine Lessons of 2018, celebrating the centenary of their establishment, were recorded,[7] including a new carol by Judith Weir.[6]

Cleobury established the Festival of Easter at King's and also Concerts at King's, a concert series throughout the year.[1][2] He took the choir on tours and led them in many recordings and broadcasts.[2] Recordings were made by the choir's own label beginning in 2012.[6]

He was conductor of Cambridge University Musical Society (CUMS) from 1983 to 2009, and made many recordings with that group including Verdi's Quattro Pezzi Sacri and Goehr's The Death of Moses. As part of the celebrations of the 800th anniversary of Cambridge University, he premiered Peter Maxwell DaviesThe Sorcerer's Mirror.[5]

[Image: 290px-Cambridge_-_King%27s_Chapel_-_stalles.jpg]



Cleobury's most notable contribution with the Choir of King's College was the incorporation of modern works, frequently through commissions, to complement the traditional repertoire.[6] His last major project there was Bach's St Matthew Passion in 2019, in a sequence of performing it alternating with the St John Passion every year. The choir performed with the Academy of Ancient Music and James Gilchrist as the Evangelist.[8] He retired on 30 September 2019, and was succeeded at King's College by Daniel Hyde.[5][9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Cleobury
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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James Lemuel Holloway III (February 23, 1922 – November 26, 2019) was a United States Navy admiral and naval aviator who was decorated for his actions during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. After the Vietnam War, he was posted to The Pentagon, where he established the Navy's Nuclear Powered Carrier Program. He served as Chief of Naval Operations from 1974 until 1978. After retiring from the Navy, Holloway served as President of the Naval Historical Foundation from 1980–1998 and served another ten years as its chairman until his retirement in 2008 when he became chairman emeritus. He was the author of Aircraft Carriers at War: A Personal Retrospective of Korea, Vietnam, and the Soviet Confrontation published in 2007 by the Naval Institute Press.
Holloway was born in Charleston, South Carolina on February 23, 1922, the son of Jean Gordon (Hagood) and then-Lieutenant (Junior Grade) James L. Holloway, Jr. (1898–1984), later a full admiral. His maternal grandfather was Major General Johnson Hagood. He graduated from Saint James School, Maryland in 1939 and was appointed to the United States Naval Academy in that year as a member of the Class of 1943. Holloway graduated from the Naval Academy in June 1942 as a member of the first three-year class accelerated by World War II

[/url]
In World War II, Holloway served in destroyers on North Atlantic convoy duty, in North African waters and in the Pacific where he participated in the [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Saipan]Battle of Saipan
, Battle of Tinian, Battle of Palau and the Battle of Leyte Gulf. He was gunnery officer of the destroyer Bennion, which at the Battle of Surigao Strait took part in a night torpedo attack which sank the Japanese battleship Yamashiro, assisted in the destruction of the destroyer Asagumo, attacked the cruiser Mogami with torpedoes, and then the following day shot down two Japanese Zeroes at short range. For this service, he received the Bronze Star Medal and Navy Commendation Medal.

After World War II, Holloway became a naval aviator. He made two carrier tours to Korea, flying Grumman F9F-2 Panther jets on combat missions against the North Korean and Chinese Communists. He assumed command of VF-52 when his commanding officer was shot down. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and three Air Medals during the Korean War, and shared in a Navy Unit Commendation awarded to the aircraft carrier Valley Forge.

In 1958, as commanding officer of VA-83, flying Douglas A-4 Skyhawks from the carrier Essex, Holloway covered the Marine landings in Lebanon and flew patrols in support of U.S. operations there until Essex was redeployed through the Suez Canal to join the Seventh Fleet in the Formosa Straits. There, he flew missions in defense of Quemoy and Matsu against the threat of a Chinese Communist invasion of those offshore islands.

From 1965 to 1967, Holloway commanded the carrier Enterprise, the Navy's first, and at that time, only nuclear-powered aircraft carrier for two combat cruises in the Gulf of Tonkin against the North Vietnamese. Enterprise established a record for the number of combat sorties flown, won the Battle Efficiency "E" award for the best carrier in the fleet, and was awarded a Navy Unit Commendation. Holloway twice received the Legion of Merit for his leadership.
Returning to the Pentagon, in 1968 Holloway established the Navy's Nuclear Powered Carrier Program, building the supercarrier Nimitz and paving the way for nine more supercarriers of this class. He was awarded the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for this achievement.

In 1970, Holloway was commander of the Carrier Striking Force of the Sixth Fleet and deployed to the Eastern Mediterranean to conduct carrier air operations in reaction to the Syrian invasion of Jordan. After the strong U.S. military response brought about the withdrawal of the Syrian forces, his task force covered the evacuation of an Army MASH (Mobile Army Surgical Hospital) unit from Amman, Jordan, by a Marine Expeditionary Group. For his performance of duty Holloway was awarded a second Navy Distinguished Service Medal and shared in a Meritorious Unit Commendation awarded to his flagship, the carrier Independence.

Holloway took command of the Seventh Fleet in 1972 during the Vietnam War, and personally led a cruiser-destroyer gunfire strike force during the Battle of Haiphong Harbor. During Operation Linebacker II, he directed the massive carrier strikes against Hanoi, which were a part of the intensive joint air effort which led to the Vietnam cease-fire in 1973. Under his command, the Seventh Fleet performed the airborne mine clearing operations in North Vietnam ports in accordance with the terms of the Paris Peace Accords. For duty as Commander, Seventh Fleet, he received a third Navy Distinguished Service Medal. He then served as Vice Chief of Naval Operations from 1973–1974.

As Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) from 1974 to 1978, Holloway was a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS), and served as CNO during the evacuation of Cyprus; the rescue of the merchant ship SS Mayaguez and its crew, and punitive strike operations against the Cambodian forces Claremont, liberty square involved in its seizure; the evacuation of U.S. nationals from Lebanon; and the Korean demilitarized zone incident in August 1976, which led to an ultimatum and an armed standoff between the Allied and North Korean armies before the North Koreans backed down. For this service, Holloway was presented a fourth Navy Distinguished Service Medal and two awards of the Defense Distinguished Service Medal.


After retiring from the navy in 1978, Holloway was a consultant to Paine Webber, Inc. and served until 1988 as president of the Council of American-Flag Ship Operators, a national association of U.S. merchant marine companies. In 1980 he chaired the Special Operations Review Group which investigated the aborted Iranian hostage rescue attempt. In 1985 he served as executive director of Vice President George H. W. Bush's Task Force on Combating Terrorism, and was a member of the President's Blue Ribbon Commission on Defense Management. In 1986, he was appointed as a Special Envoy of the Vice President to the Middle East. Later, he was a member of the Commission on Merchant Marine and Defense and the Defense Commission on Long Term Integrated Strategy. In 1985 Holloway was the technical advisor to the film Top Gun.

Holloway was chairman of the Academic Advisory Board of the United States Naval Academy, chairman of the Association of Naval Aviation, a director of the Olmsted Foundation, a trustee of the George C. Marshall Foundation, served on the Board of Visitors and Governors of St. John's College and served in a presidential appointment as US Representative to the South Pacific Commission. In 1994, he received the triennial Modern Patriot Award from the General Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, and in 1997 the National Navy League Award for Outstanding Civilian Leadership. In 1998, he was elected to the National Amateur Wrestling Hall of Fame. In 2000, he was selected by the US Naval Academy Alumni Association to receive the Distinguished Graduate Award for service to the Navy and the Naval Academy. He was enshrined in the National Museum of Naval Aviation's Hall of Honor in 2004.
Holloway was conspicuous in his personal support for the Navy's official history programs run by the Naval History & Heritage Command. His grant made the Online Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships Project possible, thereby opening one of the most important US naval history resources to a worldwide audience. He is chairman emeritus of the Naval Historical Foundation and the Historic Annapolis Foundation, the board of trustees of Saint James School, and as an emeritus member of the board of the Mariners' Museum. He is a member of the Society of the Cincinnati, the Brook Club (New York City), Maryland Club (Baltimore, Maryland), New York Yacht Club, Annapolis Yacht Club, and the Metropolitan Club of Washington, D.C., where he served as president in 1992.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_L._Holloway_III
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Remember when the Republican Party had genuine statesmen? Here was one of them:

William Doyle Ruckelshaus (July 24, 1932 – November 27, 2019) was an American attorney and U.S. government official. He was the first head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1970, was subsequently acting Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and then Deputy Attorney General of the United States. During 1983 through 1985 he returned as EPA Administrator. Ruckelshaus resigned as deputy attorney general in 1973 during the Saturday Night Massacre.

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Deutsche Bank Exec Thomas Bowers, Who Approved Donald Trump Loans, Dies By Suicide, ‘Forensic News’ Reports

The 55-year-old banker who okayed $100 million loan that helped Trump buy his Doral golf resort, hanged himself, a medical examiner's report says.



Starting in the late 1990s, at a time when most other banks would not lead him money, Donald Trump found a financial lifeline in the German-based Deutsche Bank, which loaned him approximately $1 billion. Now, the Deutsche Bank executive who would have signed off on many of the loans to Trump has died, reportedly taking his own life.

According to a report by the independent journalism site Forensic News, Thomas Bowers died on November 19 at his home in Malibu, California. Citing a Los Angeles County Medical Examiner’s report, Forensic News founder Scott Stedman reported that Bowers committed suicide by hanging. The former Deutsche Bank exec was 55 years old.

More here.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(11-27-2019, 08:42 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Deutsche Bank Exec Thomas Bowers, Who Approved Donald Trump Loans, Dies By Suicide, ‘Forensic News’ Reports

The 55-year-old banker who okayed $100 million loan that helped Trump buy his Doral golf resort, hanged himself, a medical examiner's report says.

Starting in the late 1990s, at a time when most other banks would not lead him money, Donald Trump found a financial lifeline in the German-based Deutsche Bank, which loaned him approximately $1 billion. Now, the Deutsche Bank executive who would have signed off on many of the loans to Trump has died, reportedly taking his own life.

According to a report by the independent journalism site Forensic News, Thomas Bowers died on November 19 at his home in Malibu, California. Citing a Los Angeles County Medical Examiner’s report, Forensic News founder Scott Stedman reported that Bowers committed suicide by hanging. The former Deutsche Bank exec was 55 years old.

More here.

More in general!  There is a story under this tragedy, and some enterprising journalist will dig it out, I'm sure.  It may be nothing … or everything.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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(11-28-2019, 11:27 AM)David Horn Wrote:
(11-27-2019, 08:42 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Deutsche Bank Exec Thomas Bowers, Who Approved Donald Trump Loans, Dies By Suicide, ‘Forensic News’ Reports

The 55-year-old banker who okayed $100 million loan that helped Trump buy his Doral golf resort, hanged himself, a medical examiner's report says.

Starting in the late 1990s, at a time when most other banks would not lead him money, Donald Trump found a financial lifeline in the German-based Deutsche Bank, which loaned him approximately $1 billion. Now, the Deutsche Bank executive who would have signed off on many of the loans to Trump has died, reportedly taking his own life.

According to a report by the independent journalism site Forensic News, Thomas Bowers died on November 19 at his home in Malibu, California. Citing a Los Angeles County Medical Examiner’s report, Forensic News founder Scott Stedman reported that Bowers committed suicide by hanging. The former Deutsche Bank exec was 55 years old.

More here.

More in general!  There is a story under this tragedy, and some enterprising journalist will dig it out, I'm sure.  It may be nothing … or everything.

If his body is riddled with terminal cancer, then it probably is no story. In such a case I blame the cancer and not the noose (or gun, poison, sharp objects, fall... whatever).

We do not have the full story... I would be ahead of myself to figure that President Trump's business dealings would be subject to an impeachment inquiry of any kind. 

I am unfamiliar with this news source. Sometimes the non-mainstream media find something out first. This man would not merit inclusion were it not for potential scandal. This fellow at worst would be fired with a golden parachute, and he could live very well with a trophy wife, a mansion, sports cars, fine wines, etc. On the other hand, if he was involved in corrupt dealings, a federal prosecution might loom. 

As a general rule, the countries that are desirable places in which to live extradite people for financial malfeasance.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Yasuhiro Nakasone, former Prime Minister of Japan:

Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, 27 May 1918 – 29 November 2019)[2] was a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan and President of the Liberal Democratic Party from 1982 to 1987. He was a member of the House of Representatives for more than 50 years. He was best known for pushing through the privatization of state-owned companies, and for helping to revitalize Japanese nationalism during and after his term as prime minister. He was the oldest living former state leader at the time of his death in 2019, aged 101.[3]

Much more at Wikipedia.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Mariss Jansons, conductor:

Mariss Ivars Georgs Jansons (14 January 1943 – 30 November 2019) was a Latvian conductor. He was music director of the Oslo Philharmonic from 1973 to 2000, and of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra from 1997 to 2004. He made notable recordings, especially of Gustav Mahler's symphonies. Among his awards are the 2008 Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art and the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize of 2013.

[font=sans-serif]Iraida Jansone, who was Jewish, gave birth to her son in hiding in [color=#0b0080]Riga, Latvia, after being smuggled out of the Riga Ghetto, where Iraida's father and brother were murdered by the Nazis. As a child, Jansons first studied violin with his father.[1]

[font=sans-serif]In 1946, Mariss' father, [color=#0b0080]Arvīds Jansons, won second prize in a national competition and was chosen by Yevgeny Mravinsky to be his assistant at the Leningrad Philharmonic. When his family joined him in 1956, young Mariss entered the Leningrad Conservatory, where he studied piano and conducting, although his father urged him to continue playing violin. In 1969, he continued his training in Vienna with Hans Swarowsky and in Salzburg with Herbert von Karajan. Karajan wanted to invite Jansons to be his assistant with the Berlin Philharmonic, but the Soviet authorities blocked Jansons from ever hearing about the offer.[size=x-small][color=#0b0080][2]
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Mariss Jansons, conductor:

Mariss Ivars Georgs Jansons (14 January 1943 – 30 November 2019) was a Latvian conductor. He was music director of the Oslo Philharmonic from 1973 to 2000, and of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra from 1997 to 2004. He made notable recordings, especially of Gustav Mahler's symphonies. Among his awards are the 2008 Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art and the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize of 2013.

Iraida Jansone, who was Jewish, gave birth to her son in hiding in Riga, Latvia, after being smuggled out of the Riga Ghetto, where Iraida's father and brother were murdered by the Nazis. As a child, Jansons first studied violin with his father.[1]

In 1946, Mariss' father, Arvīds Jansons, won second prize in a national competition and was chosen by Yevgeny Mravinsky to be his assistant at the Leningrad Philharmonic. When his family joined him in 1956, young Mariss entered the Leningrad Conservatory, where he studied piano and conducting, although his father urged him to continue playing violin. In 1969, he continued his training in Vienna with Hans Swarowsky and in Salzburg with Herbert von Karajan. Karajan wanted to invite Jansons to be his assistant with the Berlin Philharmonic, but the Soviet authorities blocked Jansons from ever hearing about the offer.[2]




In 1971, Jansons won the second prize at the "Herbert von Karajan" International Conducting Competition.
In 1973, Jansons was appointed Associate Conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra (now the Saint Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra). In 1979, he was appointed Music Director of the Oslo Philharmonic, with which he performed, recorded and toured extensively. Jansons resigned his Oslo position in 2000 after disputes with the city over the acoustics of the Oslo Concert Hall.[3]

In 1992, Jansons was named Principal Guest Conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra. He has worked as a guest conductor with the London Symphony Orchestra and has recorded Mahler's Symphony No. 6 with them for the LSO Live label.[4][5]

In 1997, Jansons became the Music Director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. His initial contract was for three years, but his subsequent contract renewals were evergreen contracts that required yearly renewal. In June 2002, he announced his departure from the orchestra in 2004.[6]
In April 1996 in Oslo, Jansons nearly died while conducting the final pages of La bohème, after a heart attack.[7] He recuperated in Switzerland. Later, surgeons in Pittsburgh fitted a defibrillator in his chest to give his heart an electric jolt if it fails. (Jansons's father died at a 1984 concert, conducting the Hallé Orchestra).[8] Jansons has stated that he suffers from jet lag, and this was one reason that he left his American position.[9]

At the start of the 2003/2004 season, Jansons began his tenure as Chief Conductor of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (BRSO),[10] for an initial contract of three years.[11] His commitment with the BRSO is for ten weeks per season.[12] In September 2006, Jansons extended his initial BRSO contract to August 2009.[13] In July 2007, he further extended his contract with the BRSO to August 2012.[14] In April 2011, he extended his BRSO contract to August 2015 in Munich.[15] In June 2013, the BRSO further extended Jansons's contract through August 2018.[16] In May 2015, the BRSO announced another extension of Jansons's contract through 2021.[17] In July 2018, the orchestra announced a further extension of the maestro's contract through 2024.[18] He has regularly campaigned for the construction of a new concert hall for the orchestra.[19]

In October 2002, Jansons was named the sixth Chief Conductor of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (RCO) of Amsterdam, effective 1 September 2004, succeeding Riccardo Chailly.[20] His initial Amsterdam contract was for three years,[21] and his commitment in Amsterdam was for twelve weeks per season. In April 2014, the orchestra announced the scheduled conclusion of Jansons's tenure as Chief Conductor after the 2014–2015 season.[22][23] He conducted his final concert as chief conductor of the RCO on 20 March 2015, in the presence of Queen Maxima.[24]
In 2006, Jansons conducted the Vienna Philharmonic New Year's Concert for the first time. Also in January 2006, he was awarded MIDEM's Artist of the Year Award in Cannes. In October 2007, Jansons (who is Lutheran)[25] conducted Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra for Pope Benedict XVI and 7,000 other listeners in the papal audience hall (Auditorio Paul VI). Jansons conducted the Vienna New Year's Concert for the second time in 2012. The concert was televised worldwide in seventy-three countries. He conducted the Vienna Philharmonic New Year's Concert for a third time in 2016. The New Year's Concert 2016 was broadcast in over 90 countries around the world and was seen by 50 million television viewers.

Jansons was awarded various Austrian and international honours for his achievements, including Commander of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit from King Harald of Norway and memberships in the Royal Academy of Music in London and the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of Music Friends) in Vienna. He was awarded the St. Hallvard Medal in 1986.[30] In May 2006, he was awarded the Order of the Three Stars (2nd class or Grand Commander), Latvia's highest state honour. He was awarded the Bavarian Order of Merit in 2007 and in 2010, the Bavarian Maximilian Order for Science and Art. In 2008, Jansons received the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art.[31]


Jansons' recording of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 13 with Sergey Aleksashkin (bass) and the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus won the Grammy Award for Best Orchestral Performance at the 2006 Grammy Awards.

In January 2006 he was awarded a Midem, a Cannes Classical Award as Artist of the Year. In 2007 he was honoured by the German Phono Academy with the Echo Klassik as Conductor of the Year. In 2011, he was awarded the same title by the German journal Opernwelt.[32]

Jansons won the Ernst von Siemens Music Prize in 2013.[33] On 31 March 2013 Jansons was awarded a medal of honour "For the Merits before St. Petersburg". On 4 October 2013, Jansons received the Grand Merit Cross with Star of the Federal Republic of Germany.[34]

On 1 November 2013, Jansons was awarded Knight of the Order of the Netherlands Lion and received it from Dutch Minister of Education, Culture and Science Jet Bussemaker.[35]

In a press release, dated from 23 November 2017[36] – the Royal Philharmonic Society announced, that Mariss Jansons has been awarded with the RPS Gold Medal – one of the highest honors in the world of classical music. The Medal itself was awarded to Jansons by the world-renowned pianist Mitsuko Uchida during a concert with the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks) on the eve of 24 November 2017 in London's Barbican Hall.[37] Mariss Jansons is the 104th recipient of the RPS Gold Medal.
In 2018 he was awarded an Honorary Membership of the Berliner Philharmoniker.[38]

On 14 April 2019, he received the Herbert von Karajan Prize at the Salzburg Easter Festival.[39] In 2019, he received the Opus Klassik [de] in the category "Lifetime Achievement”.[40]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariss_Jansons
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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A reminder: other countries had their Greatest Generation, too.

Ragnar Leif Ulstein MM (19 April 1920 – 3 December 2019)[1] was a Norwegian journalist, writer and resistance member. He wrote several documentary books from the Second World War, including surveys of the SOE group Norwegian Independent Company 1, volunteers sailing from Norway to Scotland, refugee traffic from Norway to Sweden, and military intelligence in Norway.

Ulstein was born in UlsteinSunnmøre, as the son of Johannes Olsson Ulstein (1879–1969) and Borghild Strand (1885–1964). He finished his secondary education at Volda in June 1940. Later that year he fled to the United Kingdom due to World War II and the German occupation of Norway. Here, Ulstein became a member of the Norwegian Independent Company 1 (NOR.I.C.1) (NorwegianKompani Linge), led by Martin Linge. He participated in Operation Anklet, a raid at Reine in December 1941. After the raid he returned to the United Kingdom.[2] In 1943 he was a part of the failed operation Vestige I, which involved placing limpet mines on ships in Svelgen harbor. The actual mine placing was performed by Harald Svindseth, but the explosives went off too early, and the ship was docked instead of sinking. Participants in Vestige I fled to England.[3] In 1944 Ulstein was tasked with returning to work as an instructor for Milorg in Sogn og Fjordane. He came via Shetland and landed near Florø together with Harald Svindseth.[4][5] Svindseth built up a Milorg subgroup near Svelgen with the codename Snowflake, whereas Ulstein led the group Siskin.[5] Siskin's basecamp was at Fosskamben in Sogndalsdalen. Important local contacts were Olav Rise in Leikanger as well as Nils Knagenhjelm and Hans H. H. Heiberg in Kaupanger. Norwegian Independent Company 1 men Nils Fjeld and Nils Thorsvik also participated, sharing the military command with Ulstein. Various incidents in February 1945 spelled the end of Siskin. Some, including Olav Rise, were arrested, whereas Ulstein managed to flee from Sogndalsdalen. German forces approached Fosskamben, but local residents secretly slowed down their travel, giving Siskin members time to hide a large weapons cache and to escape. Ulstein, Heiberg and Knagenhjelm met in Fjærland.[6] A new base was started in Frønningen. At most, 480 people had some connection to it. It did not remain operative for long, as it was disbanded at the liberation of Norway on 8 May 1945. Then, Ulstein and 72 others travelled to Gaular to assist in the decommissioning of German forces in the area.[7] For his war contributions Ulstein was decorated with the St. Olav's Medal with two oak branches, the British Military Medal, the Defence Medal 1940 – 1945, and the Haakon VII 70th Anniversary Medal.

After the war Ulstein participated in the Independent Norwegian Brigade Group in Germany.[2] When returning to Norway he was editor-in-chief of the newspaper Fjordabladet from 1948 to 1949.[5] He was an active writer. He co-edited the official two-volume work on the NOR.I.C.1 company, Kompani Linge, issued in 1948, together with Erling Jensen and Per Ratvik.[2] The books had introductions by both King Haakon and Milorg leader Jens Christian Hauge.[8][9] Ulstein worked as an editor for Filmavisen, and from 1954 as a journalist for various newspapers, including Bergens Tidende and Sunnmørsposten. He was later granted a government scholarship.[2]

He made his fiction debut in 1961 with the novel Harpegjengen.[10] He later wrote several documentary books on Norwegian resistance during World War II. The two-volume book Englandsfarten (Volume I, 1965 and Volume II, 1967) covered the traffic between Norway and United Kingdom during the early part of the war,[11][12] while Svensketrafikken (three volumes, 1974, 1975 and 1977) covered traffic of refugees from Norway to Sweden during the occupation.[10] He wrote a three volume book set on military intelligence in Norway between 1940 and 1945, Etterretningstjenesten i Norge 1940-45 (1989, 1990, 1992),[2] including activities from Special Intelligence Service agents covering German naval operations, as well as activities from XU and other organizations.[13][14][15] For his post-war work, Ulstein has been awarded the King's Medal of Merit in gold.[2]

Ulstein was also involved in the Liberal Party in Ålesund.[2] In 1972 he chaired the county chapter of Ja til EF.[16] He married Jenny Hermine Akselsen in 1951.[2]


In his later years Ulstein contributed to the website document.no, and stated in an interview for the 70-year anniversary of the war's end that freedom had become more limited and less open than after the liberation in 1945, and that freedom had come under a pressure "we could never dream about".[17]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Ulstein
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Japanese physician and aid worker shot and killed in Afghanistan:

Tetsu Nakamura (中村 哲 Nakamura Tetsu, 15 September 1946 – 4 December 2019) was a Japanese medical doctor. He was awarded the 2003 Ramon Magsaysay Award for Peace and International Understanding.[1] He devoted his work among refugees in the Afghanistan/Pakistan borderlands. 

Beginning in 1991, Nakamura opened 3 clinics to provide medical service in the mountainous eastern region of the country.[2]

Starting from 2000, a drought hit the region. A consequence of this drought was the multiplications of diseases due to malnutrition and lack of water. Nakamura stated about this situation: "One irrigation canal will do more good than 100 doctors!".[2] Starting from 2003, Nakamura started building an irrigation canal in Khiwa district of Nangarhar Province, the Marwarid Canal. The canal gets water from Kuner River, and has a length of 25.5 km.[3]

As of 2016, Nakamura has built or restored 8 additional canals, irrigating 16.000 hectares and supporting the livelihood of 600.000 people in the Gamberi Desert region.[2]  
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Nakamura declared, "Weapons and tanks don't solve problems. The revival of farming is the cornerstone of [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afghanistan]Afghanistan
's recovery".[2]

Nakamura died of his wounds after an attack Wednesday 4 December 2019 that also killed five Afghans, including the doctor's bodyguards, the driver and a passenger[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetsu_Naka...physician)


What could be more abominable than killing people involved in humanitarian relief?
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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