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Obituaries
Tom Seaver, Pitcher Who Led ‘Miracle Mets’ to Glory, Dies at 75

A Hall of Famer, Seaver won 311 games for four different teams. But Mets fans called him Tom Terrific for turning around the club’s fortunes.

Tom Seaver, who had 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons, is sixth on the career list.
Tom Seaver, who had 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons, is sixth on the career list.Credit...Associated Press

Tom Seaver, one of baseball’s greatest right-handed power pitchers, a Hall of Famer who won 311 games for four major league teams, most notably the Mets, whom he led from last place to a surprise world championship in his first three seasons, died on Monday. He was 75.

The cause was complications of Lewy body dementia and Covid-19, according to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

At 6-foot-1 and 200 pounds, give or take a few, with a thick waist and tree-trunk legs that helped generate the velocity on his fastball and hard slider and the spin on his curveball, Seaver at work was a picture of kinetic grace. He had a smooth windup, a leg kick with his left knee raised high, and a stride so long after pushing off the mound that his right knee often grazed the dirt.

With precise control, he had swing-and-miss stuff. He struck out more than 200 batters in 10 different seasons, a National League record, and on April 22, 1970, facing the San Diego Padres, he struck out a record 10 batters in a row to end the game. His total of 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons is sixth on the career list.

He was also a cerebral sort, a thinker who studied opposing hitters and pored over the details of each pitch — its break, its speed, its location. As he aged and his arm strength diminished, it was his strategic thinking and experience that extended his career.

Seaver pitched for the Cincinnati Reds, the Chicago White Sox and the Boston Red Sox during the second half of his career, winning more than 100 games, including his only no-hitter with the Reds against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1978.

Even so, the seasons he spent away from New York seem like little more than a footnote, because few players in baseball history have had the impact on a team that Seaver had on the Mets.

He was the team’s first bona fide star, known to New York fans as Tom Terrific and, more tellingly, The Franchise. The team was established five years before he arrived, and had not finished higher than ninth in the 10-team National League. Even then, the Mets had quickly earned a reputation for chuckleheaded ineptitude.

The Mets were hardly more inspiring in Seaver’s first two seasons, finishing 10th in 1967 and ninth in 1968, but Seaver himself served as the signal that the team’s fortunes were turning.

Until his arrival, no Mets pitcher had ever won more than 13 games in a season; Seaver won 16 his first year and 16 more the next.

He was the league’s rookie of the year in 1967, and was an All-Star nine times in 10 full seasons with the Mets. He had five seasons with more than 20 wins for the team, led the league in strikeouts five times and in earned run average three times. He won three Cy Young Awards as the league’s best pitcher.

All those achievements notwithstanding, there is no heroic Tom Seaver narrative without 1969, a year the so-called Miracle Mets won the World Series. That team charged from a losing record at the beginning of June and from 10 games behind in mid-August to capture the National League’s East Division crown, then swept the Atlanta Braves in the National League Championship Series and finally defeated the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles, winners of 109 regular-season games, four games to one for the World Series title.

Many Mets were unlikely contributors to the team’s unlikely success. None were more important than Seaver.

That July, he threw a nearly perfect game against the first-place Chicago Cubs, yielding only a single with one out in the ninth inning.

Beginning in August, the Mets went 39-14 the rest of the season, and Seaver won his last 10 decisions on his way to a 25-7 record and his first Cy Young. Then he won Game 1 of the N.L.C.S. against Atlanta (although he did not perform especially well), and he lost Game 1 of the World Series.

But he came back to pitch all 10 innings of Game 4, winning 2-1 and tilting the series in the Mets’ favor.

Beyond pure statistics, he was often given credit for being the workhorse whose expectations and example dragged the Mets from worst to first.

“He was a heck of a lot responsible for tightening things up around here,” the Mets catcher Jerry Grote told Sport magazine in 1970. “From the first year, he was going out to win, not pitch his turn. When Seaver’s pitching, those guys plain work a little harder.”

From 1969 on, Seaver was a celebrity — part of a new generation of sports heroes in New York. He starred along with Joe Namath of the Jets, who won the Super Bowl nine months before the Mets earned their championship, and Walt Frazier of the Knicks, who won the National Basketball Association crown in 1970.

During the championship season, when he expressed his view that the United States should get out of Vietnam, it was newsy, especially after protesters on Moratorium Day, Oct. 15, 1969, the same day as the fourth game of the World Series, distributed literature with his picture on it at Shea Stadium.

Further, both he and his wife, Nancy Lynn McIntyre, became popular objects of curiosity, recognized on the street and deluged with fan mail.

With their fresh-faced California good looks, they were invited to host a television talk show and to co-star in a regional theater production. A 1970 article about the two of them in McCall’s magazine was headlined “Tom & Nancy Seaver: America’s Very Own Beautiful Couple.”

The Mets never came close to their 1969 season again during Seaver’s tenure.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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(09-03-2020, 12:37 PM)David Horn Wrote: Tom Seaver, Pitcher Who Led ‘Miracle Mets’ to Glory, Dies at 75

A Hall of Famer, Seaver won 311 games for four different teams. But Mets fans called him Tom Terrific for turning around the club’s fortunes.

Tom Seaver, who had 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons, is sixth on the career list.
Tom Seaver, who had 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons, is sixth on the career list.Credit...Associated Press

Tom Seaver, one of baseball’s greatest right-handed power pitchers, a Hall of Famer who won 311 games for four major league teams, most notably the Mets, whom he led from last place to a surprise world championship in his first three seasons, died on Monday. He was 75.

The cause was complications of Lewy body dementia and Covid-19, according to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

At 6-foot-1 and 200 pounds, give or take a few, with a thick waist and tree-trunk legs that helped generate the velocity on his fastball and hard slider and the spin on his curveball, Seaver at work was a picture of kinetic grace. He had a smooth windup, a leg kick with his left knee raised high, and a stride so long after pushing off the mound that his right knee often grazed the dirt.

With precise control, he had swing-and-miss stuff. He struck out more than 200 batters in 10 different seasons, a National League record, and on April 22, 1970, facing the San Diego Padres, he struck out a record 10 batters in a row to end the game. His total of 3,640 strikeouts in his 20 big-league seasons is sixth on the career list.

He was also a cerebral sort, a thinker who studied opposing hitters and pored over the details of each pitch — its break, its speed, its location. As he aged and his arm strength diminished, it was his strategic thinking and experience that extended his career.

Seaver pitched for the Cincinnati Reds, the Chicago White Sox and the Boston Red Sox during the second half of his career, winning more than 100 games, including his only no-hitter with the Reds against the St. Louis Cardinals in 1978.

Even so, the seasons he spent away from New York seem like little more than a footnote, because few players in baseball history have had the impact on a team that Seaver had on the Mets.

He was the team’s first bona fide star, known to New York fans as Tom Terrific and, more tellingly, The Franchise. The team was established five years before he arrived, and had not finished higher than ninth in the 10-team National League. Even then, the Mets had quickly earned a reputation for chuckleheaded ineptitude.

The Mets were hardly more inspiring in Seaver’s first two seasons, finishing 10th in 1967 and ninth in 1968, but Seaver himself served as the signal that the team’s fortunes were turning.

Until his arrival, no Mets pitcher had ever won more than 13 games in a season; Seaver won 16 his first year and 16 more the next.

He was the league’s rookie of the year in 1967, and was an All-Star nine times in 10 full seasons with the Mets. He had five seasons with more than 20 wins for the team, led the league in strikeouts five times and in earned run average three times. He won three Cy Young Awards as the league’s best pitcher.

All those achievements notwithstanding, there is no heroic Tom Seaver narrative without 1969, a year the so-called Miracle Mets won the World Series. That team charged from a losing record at the beginning of June and from 10 games behind in mid-August to capture the National League’s East Division crown, then swept the Atlanta Braves in the National League Championship Series and finally defeated the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles, winners of 109 regular-season games, four games to one for the World Series title.

Many Mets were unlikely contributors to the team’s unlikely success. None were more important than Seaver.

That July, he threw a nearly perfect game against the first-place Chicago Cubs, yielding only a single with one out in the ninth inning.

Beginning in August, the Mets went 39-14 the rest of the season, and Seaver won his last 10 decisions on his way to a 25-7 record and his first Cy Young. Then he won Game 1 of the N.L.C.S. against Atlanta (although he did not perform especially well), and he lost Game 1 of the World Series.

But he came back to pitch all 10 innings of Game 4, winning 2-1 and tilting the series in the Mets’ favor.

Beyond pure statistics, he was often given credit for being the workhorse whose expectations and example dragged the Mets from worst to first.

“He was a heck of a lot responsible for tightening things up around here,” the Mets catcher Jerry Grote told Sport magazine in 1970. “From the first year, he was going out to win, not pitch his turn. When Seaver’s pitching, those guys plain work a little harder.”

From 1969 on, Seaver was a celebrity — part of a new generation of sports heroes in New York. He starred along with Joe Namath of the Jets, who won the Super Bowl nine months before the Mets earned their championship, and Walt Frazier of the Knicks, who won the National Basketball Association crown in 1970.

During the championship season, when he expressed his view that the United States should get out of Vietnam, it was newsy, especially after protesters on Moratorium Day, Oct. 15, 1969, the same day as the fourth game of the World Series, distributed literature with his picture on it at Shea Stadium.

Further, both he and his wife, Nancy Lynn McIntyre, became popular objects of curiosity, recognized on the street and deluged with fan mail.

With their fresh-faced California good looks, they were invited to host a television talk show and to co-star in a regional theater production. A 1970 article about the two of them in McCall’s magazine was headlined “Tom & Nancy Seaver: America’s Very Own Beautiful Couple.”

The Mets never came close to their 1969 season again during Seaver’s tenure.
He was my exact birthday twin, both of us born November 17, 1944. At first I thought Lauren Hutton also was but I believe she was a year earlier.
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Lou Brock, one-time stolen-base record-holder (single season and career)


Louis Clark Brock (June 18, 1939 – September 6, 2020) was an American professional baseball outfielder. He began his 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career with the 1961 Chicago Cubs but spent the majority of big league career as a left fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals. Brock was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985[1] and the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in 2014. He was a special instructor coach for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Brock was best known for breaking Ty Cobb's all-time major league stolen base record in 1977.[2] He was an All-Star for six seasons and a National League (NL) stolen base leader for eight seasons. Brock led the NL in doubles and triples in 1968. He also led the NL in singles in 1972, and was the runner-up for the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1974.



[Image: 53a1849922be9.image.jpg?resize=464%2C620]

Stealing second base off Detroit Tigers' pitcher Mickey Lolich in the sixth inning of the second game of the World Series (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

[Image: 95px-CardsRetired20.PNG]

Number retired by the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team.

...........................

Chicago Cubs


[Image: 220px-Lou_Brock_1964.jpg]

Brock made his major league debut with the Cubs on September 10, 
1961, at the age of 22.[5] In his rookie season of 1962, Brock became one of four players to hit a home run into the center-field bleachers at the old Polo Grounds in New York since its 1923 reconstruction. His blast came against Al Jackson in the first game of a June 17 doubleheader against the New York Mets and was one of two that cleared the wall in consecutive days,[2] with Hank Aaron's coming the very next day. Joe Adcock was the first to hit a ball over that wall, in 1953. Babe Ruth reached the old bleachers (a comparable distance) before the reconstruction. Brock was not known as a power hitter, but he did display significant power from time to time.
Brock had great speed and base running instincts, but the young right fielder failed to impress the Cubs management, hitting for only a combined .260 average over his first two seasons. In 1964 after losing patience with his development, the Cubs gave up on Brock and made him part of a trade with the St. Louis Cardinals.[6] The June 15 deadline deal for pitcher Ernie Broglio saw Brock, Jack Spring, and Paul Toth head to St. Louis for Broglio, Bobby Shantz, and Doug Clemens. Cardinals general manager Bing Devine specifically sought Brock at the insistence of Cardinals' manager Johnny Keane to increase team speed and solidify the Cardinals' lineup, which was struggling after the retirement of left fielder Stan Musial in 1963.[7] At the time, many thought the deal was a heist for the Cubs. Broglio had led the National League in wins four years earlier, and had won 18 games the season before the trade.[8]

St. Louis Cardinals

After Brock was traded to the Cardinals, his career turned around significantly. He moved to left field and batted .348 and stole 33 bases for the remainder of the 1964 season.[5] At the time of the trade, the Cardinals were 28–31, in eighth place in the National League, trailing even the Cubs, who were 27–27 and in sixth place. Brock helped the Cardinals storm from behind to capture the National League pennant on the last day of the season.[2] Four months to the day after Brock's trade, the Cardinals won the 1964 World Series in seven games over the favored New York Yankees, who were appearing in their 14th World Series in 16 years (and their last until a dozen years later). Brock's contributions to the Cardinals' championship season were recognized when he finished in tenth place in voting for the 1964 National League Most Valuable Player Award.[9] Meanwhile, Broglio won only seven games for the Chicago Cubs before retiring from baseball after the 1966 season. To this day, the trade of Brock for Broglio is considered one of the most lopsided deals in baseball history.[10]

[Image: 200px-Lou_Brock_2005.png]

Lou Brock was part of the Cardinals' coaching staff during the team's 2005 spring training.

In 1966, Brock ended Maury Wills' six-year reign as the National League's stolen base champion with 74 steals.[11] In David Halberstam's book, October 1964, the author states that manager Johnny Keane asked Brock to forgo hitting home runs in favor of stealing bases.[12] Brock went on to lead the National League in stolen bases eight times within a nine-year span between 1966 and 1974 (former teammate Bobby Tolan led the league in steals in 1970).[2]

Brock began the 1967 season by hitting five home runs in the first four games of the season, becoming the first player to do so (Barry Bonds tied this record in 2002).[13] He was hitting for a .328 average by mid-June to earn the role as the starting left fielder for the National League in the 1967 All-Star Game.[14][15] After suffering through a mid-season slump, he recovered to finish the season with a career-high 206 hits and a .299 batting average while leading the league in stolen bases and runs scored as the Cardinals won the National League pennant by ten and a half games. Brock became the first player to steal 50 bases and hit 20 home runs in the same season.[2] In the 1967 World Series, Brock hit for a .414 average, scored 8 runs and set a World Series record with seven stolen bases as the Cardinals defeated the Boston Red Sox in seven games.[16]
The Cardinals won the National League pennant for a second consecutive year in 1968 as Brock once again led the league in stolen bases as well as in doubles and triples.[5] In the 1968 World Series against the Detroit Tigers, Brock had three stolen bases in Game 3 and contributed a double, triple, home run and four runs batted in during Game 4 to help the Cardinals build a three-games to one advantage over the Tigers.[17] The Cardinals appeared to be on the verge of winning a second consecutive World Series, going into the fifth inning of Game 5 with a 3–2 lead.[17] Although Brock's base running abilities had proven to be a factor in the previous four games, his carelessness may have cost the Cardinals a run.[17] After Brock had hit a double, he tried to score standing up on Julián Javier's single to left, but Willie Horton threw him out with a strong throw to home plate.[17] Detroit rallied for three runs in the seventh inning as Mickey Lolich shut out the Cardinals for the final eight innings to win the game for the Tigers.[17] In Game 7, Brock had another crucial miscue when he was picked off base by Lolich, extinguishing a possible Cardinals rally.[18] The Tigers rallied from being down three games to one behind the excellent pitching of Mickey Lolich to win the series.[17] Brock once again stole seven bases and was the leading hitter in the series, posting a .464 batting average with 6 runs and 5 runs batted in.[19]

[Image: 200px-LouBrockstealing.jpg]

Lou Brock stealing at Busch Stadium vs the Atlanta Braves, 1975.

Beginning in [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1969_St._Louis_Cardinals_season]1969, Brock produced six consecutive seasons with 190 hits or better. He was named NL Player of the Month for the first of three times in his career in May 1971 with a .405 batting average and 8 stolen bases. In August 1973, he broke a record set by Ty Cobb when he stole his 50th base of the season, marking the ninth time he had stolen 50 or more bases in a season.[20] Brock won his second NL Player of the Month Award in August 1974, with 29 stolen bases in 30 games, despite batting only .326 and he was the first batter to be named Player of the Month without hitting a home run in the month of his award.

In 1972, Brock improved on Maury Wills' method by, instead of trying to maximize lead off distance, focusing on starting with a little momentum. "Brock pioneered the rolling start," states a later Sports Illustrated article, which also maintains that base stealing tends to be over-rated as a factor in team success.[21]

On September 10, 1974, Brock tied Wills' single-season mark of 104 with a first inning steal of second base, and then captured sole possession of the record with another swipe of second in the seventh inning.[22] He ended the season with a new major league single-season record of 118 stolen bases.[2] Brock finished second to Steve Garvey in the balloting for the 1974 National League Most Valuable Player Award.[23]
In a game against the San Diego Padres on August 29, 1977 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, Brock became the all-time major league stolen base leader when he broke Ty Cobb's career record of 892 stolen bases.[24] The record had been one of the most durable in baseball history and like Babe Ruth's record of 714 career home runs, had been considered unbreakable by some observers.[12]
Brock remained best known for base-stealing and starting Cardinals rallies. He was said to have disdained Wills' method of base-stealing, instead shortening his leads and going hard. He was also an early student of game films. He used an 8-millimetre (0.31 in) movie camera from the dugout to film opposing pitchers and study their windups and pickoff moves to detect weaknesses he could exploit.

Brock fell into a hitting slump early in the 1978 season and lost the left fielder's job. However, he fought back during spring training in 1979 with a .345 batting average to regain his starting job.[25][26] Brock was named Player of the Month for the month of May 1979, during which he produced a .433 batting average.[27]

On August 13, 1979, Brock became the fourteenth player in Major League Baseball history to reach the 3,000 hits plateau against the team that traded him, the Chicago Cubs.[28] Approximately one month later, Carl Yastrzemski reached the same plateau and was promptly invited to the White House by Massachusetts native and Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill. Brock was reported to have felt slighted that he hadn't received a similar invitation.[29] Brock originally stated that he wouldn't go to the White House even if he was invited. However, after consideration he decided that forgiveness was the best course and accepted a belated invitation to meet with the President.[30] Brock retired at the end of the season, having posted a .304 batting average in his last season at the age of 40.[5] At the end of the season, he was named the National League Comeback Player of the Year — the first player to be so named in his final Major League season.

In a 19-year major league career, Brock played in 2,616 games, accumulating 3,023 hits in 10,332 at bats for a .293 career batting average along with 486 doubles, 141 triples, 149 home runs, 900 RBI, 1,610 runs , 938 stolen bases, 761 bases on balls, .343 on-base percentage and .410 slugging percentage.[5] A six-time All-Star, Brock hit over .300 eight times during his career.[5] He ended his career with a .959 career fielding percentage.[5]
Brock held the single-season stolen base record with 118 until it was broken by Rickey Henderson in 1982. He also held the major league record for career stolen bases with 938 until it was also broken by Henderson in 1991.[2] He led the National League in stolen bases for a record eight times and also had a record 12 consecutive seasons with 50 or more stolen bases.[5] Brock is still the National League's leader in career stolen bases.[31]
Brock's .391 World Series batting average is the highest for anyone who played over 20 series games.[2][5] His 14 stolen bases in World Series play are also a series record.[32] Brock's 13 hits in the 1968 World Series tied a single-series record previously made by Bobby Richardson in 1964 against his Cardinals' team, and later tied in 1986 by Marty Barrett.[33]
In a unique (if incidental) accomplishment, Brock was the first player ever to bat in a major league regular season game in Canada. Leading off against Montreal Expo pitcher Larry Jaster (a Cardinal teammate of Brock's just the year before, who had been acquired by the Expos in that offseason's expansion draft) in the Cardinals' April 14, 1969 game at Jarry Park, he lined out to second baseman Gary Sutherland.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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British actress Diana Rigg



Dame Enid Diana Elizabeth RiggDBE (20 July 1938 – 10 September 2020) was an English actress. She played Emma Peel in the TV series The Avengers (1965–68), Countess Teresa di Vicenzo, wife of James Bond, in On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) and Olenna Tyrell in Game of Thrones (2013–17). She also enjoyed a career in theatre, including playing the title role in Medea, both in London and New York, for which she won the 1994 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. She was made a CBE in 1988 and a Dame in 1994 for services to drama.

Rigg made her professional stage debut in 1957 in The Caucasian Chalk Circle, and joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1959. She made her Broadway debut in the 1971 production of Abelard & Heloise. Her film roles include Helena in A Midsummer Night's Dream (1968); Lady Holiday in The Great Muppet Caper (1981); and Arlena Marshall in Evil Under the Sun (1982). She won the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress for the BBC miniseries Mother Love (1989), and an Emmy Award for her role as Mrs. Danvers in an adaptation of Rebecca (1997). Her other television credits include You, Me and the Apocalypse (2015), Detectorists (2015), and the Doctor Who episode "The Crimson Horror" (2013) with her daughter, Rachael Stirling.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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This is such a sad thread. People dying so young. The best people are gone. But thanks for keeping it going, Mr. Brower.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Iranian wrestler Navid Afkari executed over 2018 security guard killing
By Reuters Staff



(Reuters) - Iranian wrestler Navid Afkari was executed on Saturday after being convicted of stabbing a security guard to death during anti-government protests in 2018, state media said, in a case that has sparked international outcry.

Afkari was executed “this morning after legal procedures were carried out at the insistence of the parents and the family of the victim,” the media quoted the head of the justice department in southern Fars province, Kazem Mousavi, as saying.

Afkari was convicted of killing Hassan Turkman, a water company security guard, and other charges. Iran’s Supreme Court rejected a review of the case in late August.

Afkari, a 27-year-old Greco-Roman wrestler, had said he was tortured into making a false confession, according to his family and activists, and his attorney says there is no proof of his guilt. Iran’s judiciary has denied Afkari’s claims.7

Afkari’s attorney accused authorities of denying his client a family visit before the execution, as required by law.

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“Were you in so much hurry to execute the sentence that you also deprived Navid of a last meeting?,” Hassan Younesi said on Twitter.

There was no immediate reaction by Iranian officials to the attorney’s accusation.

The International Olympic Committee said the execution of Afkari was “very sad news”, adding in a statement that IOC President Thomas Bach had written this week to Iranian leaders asking for mercy for him, while respecting Iran’s sovereignty.

A global union representing 85,000 athletes had called on Tuesday for Iran’s expulsion from world sport if it executed Afkari.

Afkari’s case had sparked an outcry from Iranians on social media and human rights groups. U.S. President Donald Trump also called on Iran this month not to execute the wrestler.

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The killing of the security guard took place during some of the worst unrest in a decade over economic hardships. Iran’s clerical rulers have blamed the street protests what they call “thugs” linked to exiles and foreign foes - the United States and Israel.

Iranian state television aired a video last week in which Afkari appeared to confess to Turkman’s killing. The television also showed what appeared to be written confessions by Afkari, but he said in a recording circulated on social media that he was coerced into signing the documents.

“I hit twice, once and then again,” Afkari was shown saying with a stabbing gesture during a police reconstruction of the killing.

Human rights groups frequently accuse Iran’s state media of airing coerced confessions. Iran denies the accusation.

Editing by Andrew Cawthorne and Frances Kerry

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-iran-...KKBN2630EP

My comment:

If anyone has any doubt that Iran has a gangster regime, then this should disabuse you of such. The techniques for investigating a stabbing murder are well-enough established (finger prints, blood of the victim and perhaps the killer) that nobody needs to torture a confession out of anyone anymore.

Torturing someone into an abject confession of a capital crime, that coerced confession resulting in execution, is itself murder of the most premeditated and inexcusable kind.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Robert W. Gore, inventor of a critical plastic


Robert W. "Bob" Gore (April 15, 1937 – September 17, 2020) was an American engineer and scientist, inventor and businessman. Gore led his family's company, W. L. Gore & Associates, in developing applications of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) ranging from computer cables to medical equipment to the outer layer of space suits.[1][2] His most significant breakthrough was likely the invention of Gore-Tex, a waterproof/breathable fabric popularly known for its use in sporting and outdoor gear.
.
While his father Bill Gore was working for DuPont, he was also experimenting at home with DuPont materials such as Teflon Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon PTFE). He wanted to insulate electrical wires using PTFE, but attempts to coat wire with powdered PTFE did not produce a consistent coating. In April 1957, while Bob was still a sophomore at Delaware, Bill showed him around his home lab and explained the problem he was having.

Bob suggested surrounding the wire with a different form of PTFE, a white tape that was already of uniform thickness. His father expected that the PTFE tape would not stick to the wire, but he tried the idea, and it worked. Wires were laid between layers of PTFE tape and sent through a grooved calendar roll, then heated to melt the tape into a coherent coating. The result was a PTFE-insulated ribbon cable containing multiple copper conductors, later called "Multi-Tet Cable".
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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author Winston Groom (Forrest Gump)


Winston Francis Groom Jr. (March 23, 1943 – September 17, 2020)[1][2] was an American novelist and non-fiction writer. He is best known for his 1986 novel Forrest Gump, which was adapted into the popular 1994 film Forrest Gump directed by Robert Zemeckis. The film was considered a cultural phenomenon and won six Academy Awards. He published a sequel, Gump and Co., in 1995. He also wrote numerous non-fiction works, on diverse subjects including the American Civil War and World War I.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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Gale Sayers, from the NFL Hall of Fame: S
GALE SAYERS
7 SEASONS
 
4,956 RUSHING YARDS
 
9,435 COMBINED NET YARDS
 
5 ALL-NFL SELECTIONS
The  
4 PRO BOWLS


(KANSAS)...6'0'', 198...GALE EUGENE SAYERS ... KANSAS ALL-AMERICAN ... EXCEPTIONAL BREAK-AWAY RUNNER ... SCORED ROOKIE RECORD 22 TDS, 132 POINTS, 1965 ... LED NFL RUSHERS, 1966, 1969 ... NAMED ALL-TIME NFL HALFBACK, 1969 ... ALL-NFL FIVE STRAIGHT YEARS ... PLAYER OF GAME IN THREE PRO BOWLS ... CAREER TOTALS: 9,435 COMBINED NET YARDS, 4,956 YARDS RUSHING, 336 POINTS ... NFL LIFETIME KICKOFF RETURN LEADER ... BORN MAY 30, 1943, IN WICHITA, KANSAS ... DIED SEPTEMBER 23, 2020, AT AGE OF 77

GALE SAYERS CHICAGO BEARS


"I had a style all my own. The way I ran, lurchy, herky-jerky, I kept people off-guard so if I didn’t have that much power when I hit a man, hell, he was off-balance and I could knock him down."

[Image: Sayers_Gale_Action_180-220.jpg?535]Gale Sayers burst upon the pro football scene in 1965 with the kind of impact that the sport had not felt in many years. It is difficult to imagine a more dynamic debut than the one he enjoyed as a rookie. In his first heavy pre-season action, he raced 77 yards on a punt return, 93 yards on a kickoff return, and then startled everyone with a 25-yard scoring pass against the Los Angeles Rams.

In regular season, he scored four touchdowns, including a 96-yard game breaking kickoff return, against the Minnesota Vikings. And, in the next-to-last game, playing on a muddy field that would have stalled most runners, Gale scored a record-tying six touchdowns against the San Francisco 49ers. Included in his sensational spree were an 80-yard pass-run play, a 50-yard rush and a 65-yard punt return. For the entire season, Gale scored 22 touchdowns and 132 points, both then-rookie records.


Quiet, unassuming, and always ready to compliment a teammate for a key block, Sayers continued to sizzle in 1967 and well into the 1968 season. Then, in the ninth game, Sayers suffered a knee injury that required immediate surgery.
After a tortuous rehabilitation program, Gale came back in 1969 in a most spectacular manner, winding up with his second 1,000-yard rushing season and universal Comeback of the Year honors. But injuries continued to take their toll and, just before the 1972 season, Gale finally had to call it quits.


In his relatively short career, he compiled a record that can never be forgotten. His totals show 9,435 combined net yards, 4,956 yards rushing, and 336 points scored. At the time of his retirement he was the NFL's all-time leader in kickoff return yards. He won All-NFL honors five straight years and was named Offensive Player of the Game in three of the four Pro Bowls in which he played.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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How did we miss this one for so long?

Quote:US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the history-making jurist, feminist icon and national treasure, has died, aged 87.

Ginsburg became only the second woman ever to serve as a justice on the nation's highest court.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-49488374
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IMO, Ginsburg's untimely death is the worst national tragedy since JFK.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Bader_Ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (/ˈbeɪdər ˈɡɪnzbɜːrɡ/; born Joan Ruth Bader; March 15, 1933 – September 18, 2020) was an American jurist who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1993 until her death in 2020.[1] She was nominated by President Bill Clinton and was generally viewed as a moderate judge who was a consensus builder at the time of her nomination.[2][3] She eventually became part of the liberal wing of the Court as the Court shifted to the right over time. Ginsburg was the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, after Sandra Day O'Connor. During her tenure, Ginsburg wrote notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and married Martin D. Ginsburg, becoming a mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated joint first in her class. After law school, Ginsburg entered academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent much of her legal career as an advocate for gender equality and women's rights, winning many arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsel in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court in 1993. Between O'Connor's retirement in 2006 and the appointment of Sonia Sotomayor in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court. During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, notably in Ledbetter v. Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. (2007). Ginsburg's dissenting opinion was credited with inspiring the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act which was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2009, making it easier for employees to win pay discrimination claims.[4]

Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her passionate dissents in numerous cases, widely seen as reflecting paradigmatically liberal views of the law. She was playfully and notably dubbed "The Notorious R.B.G." by a law student, a reference to the late Brooklyn-born rapper The Notorious B.I.G., and she later embraced the moniker.[5] Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., on September 18, 2020, at the age of 87, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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(Yesterday, 12:40 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: IMO, Ginsburg's untimely death is the worst national tragedy since JFK...

To be honest, she should have done what Sandra Day O'Conner and Anthony Kennedy did: retire under a President who will pick a good successor. Note, Kennedy and O'Conner are Republicans, and made sure their seats remained that way.  If RBG and Thurgood Marshall had followed that model, we wouldn't be under the gun today.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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(Yesterday, 03:44 PM)David Horn Wrote:
(Yesterday, 12:40 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: IMO, Ginsburg's untimely death is the worst national tragedy since JFK...

To be honest, she should have done what Sandra Day O'Conner and Anthony Kennedy did: retire under a President who will pick a good successor. Note, Kennedy and O'Conner are Republicans, and made sure their seats remained that way.  If RBG and Thurgood Marshall had followed that model, we wouldn't be under the gun today.

That is a good point. She could have retired in 2014, before the Republicans took the Senate too and gained the ability to block any Obama appointment, which they would have done. I guess she felt she had some good years still in her in 2014, and had the best ideas and abilities, and probably thought Hillary was going to win.

I doubt she could have anticipated that, if she resigned so Obama could pick her successor, that she would have to do it early in 2014 because the Democrats would lose the Senate in November and the Republicans would therefore and thereafter block any Obama appointment. She might have realized this if she was aware enough of history (of 6th-year midterms) and the ruthlessness of McConnell and Co.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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