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I'm a member of the Homeland Generation (2005). Ask me anything.
#1
Heart 
Hello! I'm a Gen Z/Homelander girl, born in March of 2005, currently a freshman in high schooler. My parents, aunts, and uncles are all Gen X (although only one uncle lived here all his life, the others are all immigrants).

I learned about generations in.. 2017, ish? I've kept that basic stuff in the back of my mind until November of 2019 w̶h̶e̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶"̶o̶k̶ ̶b̶o̶o̶m̶e̶r̶"̶ ̶m̶e̶m̶e̶ ̶e̶x̶p̶l̶o̶d̶e̶d̶ and I got into generational theory. I'm a little over half-way done with reading The Fourth Turning, and I plan on getting Generations afterward. I really wanna see Niel Howe write "The First Turning" later this decade! 

Anyway, since then, I've been talking a LOT about generations online. Especially on Reddit. I might become a sociologist in the future, because these topics really peak my interest. Today I found out this place existed, and have spent a few hours on here reading these posts. They're seriously fascinating.

So yeah, ask me anything that's not seriously invading my privacy. I'll try my best to answer every question, but I only remember stuff from 2010 onwards. I really begin to remember stuff in 2016 and you all could probably guess why. I hope this thread is interesting or helpful!
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#2
Welcome. You will notice that you are far from the first to be here. You will find Silent. Boomer, X, and Millennial posters. Many of us have our own agendas.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#3
(02-20-2020, 06:25 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Welcome. You will notice that you are far from the first to be here. You will find Silent. Boomer, X, and Millennial posters. Many of us have our own agendas.

Thank you for the warm welcome! Being much younger than everyone, I will admit this forum is a little intimidating, but I'm sure it won't be after I make a few more posts and get to know everyone!
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#4
Welcome! I believe you are the first Homelander on this forum. It’s not too intimidating on here. Most of the nastier conflicts are between boomers and Xers which is quite fitting.

What traits have you noticed between yourself and younger peers vs millennials? I always enjoyed comparing my peers born in the mid-late 90’s with my two older brothers who were born in the 1980’s.
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#5
This Boomer recognizes what our worst has done and what the best of the X have done. The worst Boomers have acted like an aristocracy without any pretense of noblesse oblige. The mature X have tried to find interstices that Corporate America has ignored (not enough profit for them). The solution to an unjust capitalist order is not less -- but instead more -- entrepreneurial activity.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#6
Okay, here's a question. Why do you believe that a 2005 birth year is Gen Z rather than Millenial? I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just asking for your reasons.
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#7
(02-20-2020, 11:33 PM)Snowflake1996 Wrote: Welcome! I believe you are the first Homelander on this forum. It’s not too intimidating on here. Most of the nastier conflicts are between boomers and Xers which is quite fitting.

What traits have you noticed between yourself and younger peers vs millennials? I always enjoyed comparing my peers born in the mid-late 90’s with my two older brothers who were born in the 1980’s.
Thank you for the question! Most of my online friends are older than me, so I'll refer to those when referring to Millennials. They're either in late high school or college.

They're all honest and hardworking, and striving to be better people. They're also very understanding. I think those kinds of people are capable of winning a war.

As for 13 and 14 year olds I'm friend with, its hard to tell. I guess value kindness and acceptance. Something interesting I did notice is that we have lower self esteem. Most people with depression I've met are my age. Especially guys. I'm casually self-depreciating, like other Homelanders, but am annoyed when people are so much so to the point where its annoying. But I also think we're less likely to be triggered by tragic events? I saw more Millennials tell people to stop with the WWIII memes because its scaring them on Twitter. I don't mind dark jokes/memes as much as my Millennial peers unless they're ACTUALLY hurting people.

Millennials seem very optimistic from my experience, but again, are triggered by whats happening in the world around them. A lot of Homelanders are pessimists, but there are realists too.

We admire our Millennial friends very much. We trust them with decisions and believe they know best. Meanwhile I've seen Millennials admire other Millennials in the same way.

The people I've seen the most passionate about LGBTQ rights, climate change, gun rights, fires, politics, etc are Zillennials. College Millennials don't bring them up. I think the current issue I'm the most worried about AND is the most important is climate change. Even my 9-year-old sister is passionate about saving the Earth. Me and my friends really like Bernie Sanders.
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#8
(02-21-2020, 02:54 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: This Boomer recognizes what our worst has done and what the best of the X have done.  The worst Boomers have acted like an aristocracy without any pretense of noblesse oblige. The mature X have tried to find interstices that Corporate America has ignored (not enough profit for them). The solution to an unjust capitalist order is not less -- but instead more -- entrepreneurial activity.
I actually really admire what Boomers have done during the Consciousness Revolution! You guys brought us more gender equality, racial equality, and LGBTQ rights. You also brought us lots of 60s, 70s, and 80s classics. Those were the best times for pop culture IMO. But it's good that you recognize your generation's flaws. I hope there's more boomers like you Smile
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#9
(02-21-2020, 03:27 AM)Warren Dew Wrote: Okay, here's a question.  Why do you believe that a 2005 birth year is Gen Z rather than Millenial?
The 2008 Recession was the start of our current Crisis, and 2005-borns won't remember it. I actually think Gen Z might start at 2003, because they probably weren't old enough to comprehend it. Maybe even 2000 is a good starting date, but people born then have more Millennial traits, I think.
But it's really hard to tell at this point. Only now is the Crisis picking up speed, and it might end in the early 2030s. I'd be 25+ by then. If the Crisis does end there, Gen Alpha would start being born in.. lets say, 2026, and Z would cap off at 2025. The birth range will fluctuate in the coming years, and I'm excited to see what the final one will be.
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#10
(02-21-2020, 08:02 AM)Camz Wrote:
(02-20-2020, 11:33 PM)Snowflake1996 Wrote: Welcome! I believe you are the first Homelander on this forum. It’s not too intimidating on here. Most of the nastier conflicts are between boomers and Xers which is quite fitting.

What traits have you noticed between yourself and younger peers vs millennials? I always enjoyed comparing my peers born in the mid-late 90’s with my two older brothers who were born in the 1980’s.
Thank you for the question! Most of my online friends are older than me, so I'll refer to those when referring to Millennials. They're either in late high school or college.

They're all honest and hardworking, and striving to be better people. They're also very understanding. I think those kinds of people are capable of winning a war.

As for 13 and 14 year olds I'm friend with, its hard to tell. I guess value kindness and acceptance. Something interesting I did notice is that we have lower self esteem. Most people with depression I've met are my age. Especially guys. I'm casually self-depreciating, like other Homelanders, but am annoyed when people are so much so to the point where its annoying. But I also think we're less likely to be triggered by tragic events? I saw more Millennials tell people to stop with the WWIII memes because its scaring them on Twitter. I don't mind dark jokes/memes as much as my Millennial peers unless they're ACTUALLY hurting people.

Millennials seem very optimistic from my experience, but again, are triggered by whats happening in the world around them. A lot of Homelanders are pessimists, but there are realists too.

We admire our Millennial friends very much. We trust them with decisions and believe they know best. Meanwhile I've seen Millennials admire other Millennials in the same way.

The people I've seen the most passionate about LGBTQ rights, climate change, gun rights, fires, politics, etc are Zillennials. College Millennials don't bring them up. I think the current issue I'm the most worried about AND is the most important is climate change. Even my 9-year-old sister is passionate about saving the Earth. Me and my friends really like Bernie Sanders.

-- this makes sense sense. Bernie's an Artist & so r u. Smile

U bring up depression. 1 of my Gen Z nephews has been in & out of a facility due 2 depression. It never occurred 2 me til now this could be a generational thing
Heart  Bernie/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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#11
(02-20-2020, 05:04 PM)Camz Wrote: Hello! I'm a Gen Z/Homelander girl, born in March of 2005, currently a freshman in high schooler. My parents, aunts, and uncles are all Gen X (although only one uncle lived here all his life, the others are all immigrants).

I learned about generations in.. 2017, ish? I've kept that basic stuff in the back of my mind until November of 2019 w̶h̶e̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶"̶o̶k̶ ̶b̶o̶o̶m̶e̶r̶"̶ ̶m̶e̶m̶e̶ ̶e̶x̶p̶l̶o̶d̶e̶d̶ and I got into generational theory. I'm a little over half-way done with reading The Fourth Turning, and I plan on getting Generations afterward. I really wanna see Niel Howe write "The First Turning" later this decade! 

Anyway, since then, I've been talking a LOT about generations online. Especially on Reddit. I might become a sociologist in the future, because these topics really peak my interest. Today I found out this place existed, and have spent a few hours on here reading these posts. They're seriously fascinating.

So yeah, ask me anything that's not seriously invading my privacy. I'll try my best to answer every question, but I only remember stuff from 2010 onwards. I really begin to remember stuff in 2016 and you all could probably guess why. I hope this thread is interesting or helpful!

Welcome Camz! I'm not sure if we have any Silents active but if we do that means 5 generations at once on this forum!

Here's a question for you - would you say you are close to your GenX parents? And do you interact regularly with any other generations? Any siblings?

Thanks for joining our little discussion group.
Steve Barrera

[A]lthough one would like to change today's world back to the spirit of one hundred years or more ago, it cannot be done. Thus it is important to make the best out of every generation. - Hagakure

Saecular Pages
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#12
(02-21-2020, 08:11 AM)Camz Wrote:
(02-21-2020, 02:54 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: This Boomer recognizes what our worst has done and what the best of the X have done.  The worst Boomers have acted like an aristocracy without any pretense of noblesse oblige. The mature X have tried to find interstices that Corporate America has ignored (not enough profit for them). The solution to an unjust capitalist order is not less -- but instead more -- entrepreneurial activity.
I actually really admire what Boomers have done during the Consciousness Revolution! You guys brought us more gender equality, racial equality, and LGBTQ rights. You also brought us lots of 60s, 70s, and 80s classics. Those were the best times for pop culture IMO. But it's good that you recognize your generation's flaws. I hope there's more boomers like you Smile

I'm going to say that we Boomers didn't do all that. The Silent did much to shape mass culture, and they often offered the brainiest aspects of pop culture. Think of the Fab Four (two Silent and two Boomers), the Beach Boys, Simon and Garfunkel, Chuck Berry, Joan Baez, and Bob Dylan. The difference between Boomers and X was that X quit pretending to have any high purpose in mass culture.  In fact, as Boomers brought disco onto the scene I (among others) grew out of the mass culture. 

The biggest fighters for civil rights were Silent, and the role of GI's (among blacks) is vastly underrated. The GI generation saw the challenge to racist assumptions... and, except in the South, buckled.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#13
Hi Camz! It’s been a long time since we’ve had a mid-teen around ... not since the old forum folded several years ago. You have a great perspective and we all need it. FWIW, I have three grandchildren born October 2004, so a lot of what you’ve written hits close to home.

My biggest question has to do with your expectations of the future. Are you optimistic that things will be worked out, and you’ll be able to enjoy a normal life in adulthood? I hope so.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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#14
(02-21-2020, 11:00 AM)sbarrera Wrote: Here's a question for you - would you say you are close to your GenX parents? And do you interact regularly with any other generations? Any siblings?Thanks for joining our little discussion group.
Thank you for the warm welcome! Yeah, I'm definitely close to them, especially my mom. My parents and I weren't really close when I was in elementary school, but I guess something magical happened in middle school, and now I wanna really help them and get to know them. That's probably a mix of me maturing and scary world events. Crisis brings people closer, after all. 

I love asking my parents about previous decades I wish I got to experience. My dad told me he grew out and dyed his hair blonde when he was a teen to look like Sting, which I find hilarious. I also interact a lot with my Gen X aunt and uncle, and one of them grew up in America during the Consciousness Revolution.

Unfortunately, no, I don't really interact with generations besides my X family and Homelander friends. Unless my Millennial/Zillennial online friends count. I interact with them a lot, and the majority are American like I am. But none of them remember the 90s.

I do have a little sister. She was born here in 2010, and I'd say we're pretty close. I'm not sure what I can say about people her age other than that they're in their peak childhood and I hope they enjoy it. Will probably grow up to be a sensitive bunch.
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#15
(02-21-2020, 12:40 PM)David Horn Wrote: Hi Camz! It’s been a long time since we’ve had a mid-teen around ... not since the old forum folded several years ago. You have a great perspective and we all need it. FWIW, I have three grandchildren born October 2004, so a lot of what you’ve written hits close to home.

My biggest question has to do with your expectations of the future. Are you optimistic that things will be worked out, and you’ll be able to enjoy a normal life in adulthood?  I hope so.
Thank you! Hm.. my late teenhood might suck. The Crisis will reach its most violent point, adding onto the already great stress of high school/college (unless they close). But it will also be exciting. I'd do whatever I can to contribute to our side's victory, whatever that might mean. I'm optimistic about what the 2020s will bring in the outside world, which is more important than whatever bad things could happen in my personal life.

Hopefully I'll still be in my 20s when the High rolls around. Graduated college, stable job in character design/voice acting/sociology/teaching/whatever I'll decide on, married before 28, Gen Alpha kid before 30, Gen Beta kid before 40. Outside world is absolutely thriving. LGBTQ+ rights are human rights. Climate change/global warming isn't nearly as big of an issue anymore. No need to worry about school shootings since no one even thinks about them anymore. After the Crisis, the world will never be the same. I just hope the culture isn't too lacking in creativity, and I'm not dead by the next Crisis. Positive thoughts!
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#16
(02-21-2020, 09:03 AM)Camz Wrote:
(02-21-2020, 03:27 AM)Warren Dew Wrote: Okay, here's a question.  Why do you believe that a 2005 birth year is Gen Z rather than Millenial?
The 2008 Recession was the start of our current Crisis, and 2005-borns won't remember it. I actually think Gen Z might start at 2003, because they probably weren't old enough to comprehend it. Maybe even 2000 is a good starting date, but people born then have more Millennial traits, I think.

That's a nice, analytical approach.  I vaguely remember that Strauss & Howe place the last GI birth year in 1924, which would have been five years before the 1929 crash.  Of course, there was a time when people thought 9/11, rather than the financial crisis, was the start of the Crisis.

I also seem to remember that Strauss & Howe regard the years that shape generations as the young adulthood years, though, rather than the childhood years.  I think the childhood years are a better marker for Idealist generations - they basically are the first that have no personal memory of the preceding crisis war - but I'm not sure we'll know the transition between Millenial and new Adaptive until we know who ends up fighting in the impending crisis war and who is too young.

Eric thinks the next crisis war, or the equivalent, will start around 2025.  I'm inclined to agree, although my reasoning is not something he'd agree with.

Quote:But it's really hard to tell at this point. Only now is the Crisis picking up speed, and it might end in the early 2030s. I'd be 25+ by then. If the Crisis does end there, Gen Alpha would start being born in.. lets say, 2026, and Z would cap off at 2025. The birth range will fluctuate in the coming years, and I'm excited to see what the final one will be.

Yes.

Quote:I just hope the culture isn't too lacking in creativity, and I'm not dead by the next Crisis.

The 2020s crisis, or the 2100s crisis?  One of the things about Adaptives is that they tend to have very high crisis mortality - to the point that some of the most famous are the ones that don't survive, like Anne Frank.
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#17
Hey there, welcome to the board! Nice to see another person that's sort of from my generation. I'm a "Millennial In Name Only" and relate to Gen Z and the Artist archetype in a lot of ways, since I'm not a '90s kid, don't remember events like 9/11, and share the same sense of meme humor that you mentioned. What's the earliest news event you remember? Are there any historical figures from Artist generations you feel like you relate to?
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#18
(02-21-2020, 09:31 PM)Warren Dew Wrote:
(02-21-2020, 09:03 AM)Camz Wrote: I just hope the culture isn't too lacking in creativity, and I'm not dead by the next Crisis.
The 2020s crisis, or the 2100s crisis?  One of the things about Adaptives is that they tend to have very high crisis mortality - to the point that some of the most famous are the ones that don't survive, like Anne Frank.

2100s! I'd like to see history unfold as much as possible.
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#19
(02-23-2020, 11:19 AM)Camz Wrote:
(02-21-2020, 09:31 PM)Warren Dew Wrote:
(02-21-2020, 09:03 AM)Camz Wrote: I just hope the culture isn't too lacking in creativity, and I'm not dead by the next Crisis.
The 2020s crisis, or the 2100s crisis?  One of the things about Adaptives is that they tend to have very high crisis mortality - to the point that some of the most famous are the ones that don't survive, like Anne Frank.

2100s! I'd like to see history unfold as much as possible.


Adaptive/Artist generations tend to be either children or elderly during a Crisis -- and as such the most vulnerable people during a Crisis Era. Children are unlikely to have developed the survival instincts necessary of their protectors are separated from them. Less likely to have reserves of body fat, and with less-developed immune systems, they are more vulnerable to famines and epidemics. Only rarely (as with Anne Frank) do they develop the intellectual sophistication necessary to express their plight. Someone else tells the story (Hansel and Gretel). The very old often lose their mobility and wits  and cannot get out of a dangerous situation; in good times people might protect the elderly, but when things get very bad -- well, what do you expect to happen to someone over 80? The very old may no longer be able to express their plight due to senility. 

We do have the remarkable and inimitable Diary of a Young Girl, now one of the most widely-read pieces of literature. But this is a rarity in itself, and what makes it so precious. Oddly we have no parallel story of some Jew born in the 1850's who perished in the Holocaust, no "Diary of a Great-Grandfather"; we expect people in their eighties to die, anyway, whether by heart failure, cancer, or some strange accident. Maybe if the Nazis found a chronicle by some elderly Jew they of course destroyed it as sentimental Schund, abominable enough to a Nazi mind for being the work of a Jew. Who knows what all the Nazis destroyed along with communities such as Jews, Roma, and well-educated Poles. 

We have yet to see how this Crisis will unfold. Eighty years ago, the Nazis were brutalizing Poland while plotting to take over most of western Europe through undisguised aggression while making assurances that they were doing nothing of the sort. Anne Frank's family thought that they were safe in Holland, a country that Imperial Germany had not invaded during World War I and in which antisemitism was discreditable. Hitler obviously hated Jews, but he had no coherent plan for their extermination. History would move fast during the latter five years of the Crisis. Ask me again in June 2020 about what the prospects of the world looked like as Europe seemed to be destined to be a very bad end:

Quote:....However matters may go in France or with the French Government or with another French Government, we in this island and in the British Empire will never lose our sense of comradeship with the French people. If we are now called upon to endure what they have been suffering, we shall emulate their courage, and if final victory rewards our toils they shall share the gains, aye. And freedom shall be restored to all. We abate nothing of our just demands—Czechs, Poles, Norwegians, Dutch, Belgians, all who have joined their causes to our own shall be restored.


What General Weygand has called the Battle of France is over... the Battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation. Upon it depends our own British life, and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be freed and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands.

But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth[e] last for a thousand years, men will still say, "This was their finest hour."

-- Sir Winston Churchill, 4 June 1940. Such is the craziness of desperation, of people recognizing the irreversible and inevitable tide of history. Satan Incarnate (you know who!) must have thought such a speech insane. The "wise" thing for the British to do would have been to surrender, set up a government willing to conciliate with Hitler (with Oswald Moseley as a key leader), adopt the Nuremberg Laws, and join in an Aryan commonwealth in which a people of Celtic, Germanic, and Scandinavian stock could be partners in a racist New Order. Such would make unnecessary any ugliness of destructive bombings by the Luftwaffe as of Warsaw or Rotterdam. 

We now know how that story played out, but who could have foreseen Hitler blowing his brains out as an enemy army advanced into Berlin?
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#20
As for the next Crisis, I can already see its cause: the consequences of anthropogenic global warming, with the economic disruption, personal dislocation, and political chaos that will ensue. Maybe we can shape that Crisis now. Nobody could see in 1865 that Japan overthrowing the feudal rule of the shoguns and unifying Italian and German states would become the monstrosities that they would be in 75 years. War had gone as far as it could with the technologies of the time with the horrible Gatling gun and the strange invention of the submarine. Big Business would supply the means of war. Sherman's march through Georgia was as devastating as warfare could get at the time.  

Here is an illustration of how climates will change from now until 2100 -- yes, in time for the Crisis of 2100 which will by more than coincidence occur in a hotter, thirstier world in which agricultural production is under stress in Europe and North America, the parts of the world that will be least afflicted. Inundation of lowlands is not shown,  but such will be inevitable as the Greenland Ice Sheet shrinks. The Sahara will expand a bit in the north, and the hot semi-desert of southeastern Spain will expand. Semi-desert will appear in some lowland areas of Romania, Hungary, and Serbia. Places like Paris, Prague, Vienna, Berlin, Warsaw, Vilnius, and Kiev will have dangerously-hot summers for people without air conditioning.

[Image: shifts.htm]

(link)

In North America, any semblance of winter disappears altogether in a small area that includes several of Florida's largest cities: Tampa, St. Petersburg, Orlando, Sarasota, and Clearwater -- if those places aren't underwater. Midland and Odessa in Texas and Roswell, New Mexico go from being barely suited for low grass to outright hot desert, so one won't have to go so far west from Dallas or San Antonio to experience conditions of hot desert as in Phoenix today. The High Plains become warmer, but also drier or at least fail to get the rain that they need for rich grain crops. Edmonton gets about as warm as Calgary -- but also similarly dry.

The really bad effects come to countries that still have large numbers of peasant farmers in lowlands with rich crop production  but rural overpopulation, as in Bangladesh and eastern rural China. "King Neptune" is more effective than any Bolshevik commissar in taking over farmland. But with the Bolsheviks the farmland was there, and what had been independent farmers became serfs on still-productive land, serfs bled for the rapid establishment of the Stalinist  version of socialism. "King Neptune" will seize land from peasant farmers and simply drive them off.

Born in 1955, I know well that I may not live out this Crisis (I probably will), but I will not be around in the 2070's to see the trends leading to the Crises with their consequences. You may see two Crisis Eras: this one and the next. This one so far has been rather tame. The next one? Some people need to be scared.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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