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Millennials match Baby Boomers as largest generation in U.S. electorate
#1
http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/201...they-vote/


Quote:Millennials, who already have surpassed Baby Boomers as the United States’ largest living generation, now have caught up to the Boomers when it comes to their share of the American electorate.
[Image: FT_16.05.13_eligibleMillennialVoters.png]

As of April 2016, an estimated 69.2 million Millennials (adults ages 18-35 in 2016) were voting-age U.S. citizens – a number almost equal to the 69.7 million Baby Boomers (ages 52-70) in the nation’s electorate, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Both generations comprise roughly 31% of the voting-eligible population.
Last month, Generation X (ages 36-51) and members of the Silent and Greatest generations (ages 71 and older) comprised about 25% and 12% of the electorate, respectively.



http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/201...they-vote/
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#2
(05-23-2016, 04:32 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: Danhttp://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/05/16/millennials-match-baby-boomers-as-largest-generation-in-u-s-electorate-but-will-they-vote/


Quote:Millennials, who already have surpassed Baby Boomers as the United States’ largest living generation, now have caught up to the Boomers when it comes to their share of the American electorate.
[Image: FT_16.05.13_eligibleMillennialVoters.png]


X is interesting. You can see the tail end of the youngest Xers reaching 18. And then it seems to level off. But wait, it didn't actually level off ... it kept rising until now.

"Durned furiners!" .... Big Grin

Well hopefully us highly diverse Xers will make a real difference in this year's elections.
If you go by S&H, you have to deduct about 16.8 from Boom and tack it on to X. Tongue
We're not X'ers according to PEW so somethin's messed up, man.

As such

comment to link Wrote:Anonymous • 2 weeks ago
In a 2012 article for the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, George Masnick wrote that the “Census counted 82.1 million” Gen Xers in the U.S. The Harvard Center uses 1965 to 1984 to define Gen X so that Boomers, Xers, and Millennials “cover equal 20-year age spans”. Masnick concluded that immigration filled in any birth year deficits during low fertility years of the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Jon Miller at the Longitudinal Study of American Youth at the University of Michigan wrote that “Generation X refers to adults born between 1961 and 1981” and it “includes 84 million people” in the U.S


...

another comment Wrote:Anonymous • 4 days ago

Why are more years given to boomers and millenials than Gen X? I also read where Gen X is from 1961 to 1981. There’ve been a lot of “Giants” that came from Gen X not just from boomers..and quite frankly I feel these researchers don’t want to give Gen X the contributing credit we are do b/c …well, they want to keep us X’d out (for the name’s sake) so they add and subtract as they feel. But don’t you ever forget this…we will Always be the X FACTOR


So , that means 1961-1964 = biggest no matter where it gets stuffed!!!!   Big Grin
---Value Added Cool
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#3
(05-23-2016, 09:29 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: In any case the ongoing growth in eligible X voters clear up to the present day is a thing. All due to immigration. So "build a wall" is sharp stick in our collective eye.

Beat me to it.  Cohort disagreements aside, the total number of Xers is likely even higher due to immigration, and it's a generation that'll likely have lifetime weaker voting power as a result.  Quite the shame for several reasons.
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