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Favorite movies by turning
#1
What are your favorite films from each turning going back to World War I and Prohibition era? Here are five favorite films of mine from each turning:

Great Depression and WWII (4T)

The Wizard of Oz
It Happened One Night
Bringing Up Baby
Citizen Kane
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

American High (1T)

All About Eve
The Searchers
To Kill a Mockingbird
12 Angry Men
Psycho

Consciousness Revolution (2T)

Halloween
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
The Deer Hunter
E.T.: the Extra-terrestrial
Taxi Driver

Culture Wars and Long Boom (3T)

Back To the Future
Terminator 2: Judgment Day
Pulp Fiction
Kill Bill Vol. 1 & 2
Toy Story

Millennial Crisis (4T)

Drive
Logan
La La Land
Frozen
The Dark Knight
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#2
Top Hat; Sleeping Beauty; The Empire Strikes Back; The Matrix; Interstellar.
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#3
One thing I noticed was when I watched peoples' posts on you tube of their lists/ short takes and excerpts of favorite movies, younger generations chose scenes that were crass and full of swearing as the best and most funny scenes. I cannot agree with their choice of movies, any more than their choice of music, by and large.

I have no comment on the current 4T. As Sgt. Schulz would say, I know nothing; nuuuu-thinggg!

Some of the best movies of the 3T were, probably, the sci-fi and fantasy movies by Spielberg and Lucas, although this genre started in the 2T. Forrest Gump was great, and the Shawshank Redemption, both mid 90s. Schindler's List was moving.

Probably the best movies in my lifetime were early 2T, just like the best music. My Fair Lady, Dr. Strangelove, Peter O'Toole movies, A Man for All Seasons. In the 1970s, the best movies were too violent (like the Godfather movies, and The French Connection).

As in music, in the 1T movies were too conventional, and many of the best were WWII based. Too many westerns. Humphrey Bogart was great. But he was also 4T. I agree with 12 Angry Men, precursor of the TV drama The Defenders. The end of the 1T was the "humanitarian era" cusp of the 2T, and produced great movies like To Kill a Mockingbird, The Bird Man of Alcatraz, The Manchurian Candidate.

The 4T was the golden age: Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, Grapes of Wrath, Casablanca, Citizen Kane, etc. Like in pop music, with its romantic flair, many 4T movies were good stories and fine musicals.

The previous 3T is a great tradition too, including the best silent movies. The Keystone Cops, Harold Lloyd, Charlie Chaplin.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#4
Top 5 movies from each turning?  OK, I can make an attempt.


GP Unraveling/WWI/Prohibition:  

Nosferatu: a Symphony of Horror (1922).  
The Phantom of the Opera (1925)
The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

Unfortunately, that's the best I can come up with in this category.  I'm generally not too keen on, or perhaps not as knowledgeable about, silent films.  Nosferatu is one I can watch multiple times.


GP Crisis/Great Depression/WWII

Frankenstein (1931)
Top Hat (1935)
Bringing Up Baby (1938)
The Wizard of Oz (1939)
Casablanca (1942)


Post-war High/Cold War/Beat Generation

The Big Sleep (1946)
Notorious (1946)
The Red Shoes (1948)
The Night of the Hunter (1955)
Psycho (1960)


The Awakening/Vietnam/Counterculture

The Sound of Music (1965)
Young Frankenstein (1974)
Star Wars: a New Hope (1977)
The Deer Hunter (1978)
The Shining (1980)


Unraveling/Culture Wars/Generation X

Amadeus (1984)
Boogie Nights (1997)
The Big Lebowski (1998)
The Matrix (1999)
Lord of the Rings: the Fellowship of the Ring (2001)


The Current 4T Crisis Era

Going to come up a little short in this area, too, I'm afraid.  I seldom see films these days, and am harder to please when I do.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2010-2011)
Winter's Bone (2010)
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#5
I notice that Eric was the only one to mention Dr. Strangelove. If any Kubrick movie had real impact, it was that one.

I also want to throw-in The Princess Bride as one of the most quoted movies of all time: impressive for a comedy.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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#6
Some that I would add:

WWI, Roaring Twenties

Battleship Potemkin
The Gold Rush
The General
The Witches
Metropolis
M
The Big Trail

Great Depression, Crisis Era

All Quiet on the Western Front
The 39 Steps
Sleeping Beauty
The Adventures of Robin Hood
Citizen Kane
Rebecca
Mrs. Miniver
How Green Was My Valley
Richard III (with Lawrence Olivier)

American High

Singin' in the Rain
Anatomy of a Murder
Vertigo
Seven Samurai
A Touch of Evil
The Seventh Seal
101 Dalmatians
Cinderella
Some Like It Hot

Boom Awakening

Lawrence of Arabia
2001: A Space Odyssey
A Clockwork Orange
Fiddler on the Roof
Patton
The Graduate
La Dolce Vita

Unraveling

Star Trek IV
Goodfellas
Fargo
Unforgiven
Toy Story I
Jurassic Park

current Crisis

Star Wars III
Lincoln
The Artist
Phantom of the Opera
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


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#7
(12-05-2017, 10:35 AM)David Horn Wrote: I notice that Eric was the only one to mention Dr. Strangelove.  If any Kubrick movie had real impact, it was that one.

Maybe, but I don't enjoy watching it nearly as much as I do the Shining.

The Shining was just such a beautifully made film, as well as very frightening--the sweeping shots of the snowy mountain scenery and the continuous, maze-like shots of the hotel's interior, with its unsettling spatial logic.  Beautiful use of music as well, the Berlioz and the Bartok and the 1930s ballroom numbers adding to the creepiness.  The story, as we all know, is by Stephen King and is about a small family headed by an alcoholic father with a history of abuse who, in order to devote his time to writing, isolates them from the rest of the world in a haunted hotel, and quickly descends into homicidal madness.  I thought one of the most chilling scenes in the film was early on, before the family even arrives at the Overlook with its horrors, when Wendy discusses Danny with the pediatrician and makes excuses for her husband's violent past behavior--"it's just one of those things."
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