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"Core" vs. "Non-Core" Semi-Generations
#1
There should be little disagreement that the last-wave of G.I.'s formed that generation's core.  For the earlier-born members of the Hero archetype, their '40s took place in the '30s.

These "core" G.I.s then went on to be the predominant parents of early-wave Boomers, who proved to be the core of their generation - younger Boomers having had their '60s in the '70s.  Meanwhile, the older G.I.s parented the Silent, who had no "core" at all.

Then "core" Boomers parented the "core" Xers - the last wave, whose '90s experience so overshadowed the "Baby Busters'" '80s experience that this became a comedic punchline: "The '90s are gonna make the '80s look like the '50s," according to a line from an otherwise-forgettable movie.  The late boomers had to settle for siring the early Millennials, who are shaping up as the "lesser" Millennials.

If this pattern holds, the "edgy" late Xers, who are largely the parents of early-born Homelanders, could get to see their kids grow up to be more "edgy" than late-born Homelanders - or maybe not, because there might be no such thing as a "core" Artist sub-generation, ever.
"It was better with them that were slain by the sword, than with them that died with hunger, for these pined away being consumed for want of the fruits of the earth" - Lamentations 4:9
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#2
I always thought that the "core" of a generation simply meant those that were born in the middle years. For example, Boomers born from 1948 to 1955, Gen X from 1966 to 1976--give or take a year or two.
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#3
(09-02-2016, 10:07 PM)gabrielle Wrote: I always thought that the "core" of a generation simply meant those that were born in the middle years.  For example, Boomers born from 1948 to 1955, Gen X from 1966 to 1976--give or take a year or two.

I think Anthony's point has more to do with the connection of individual generations to the core turning events that defined them.  From a purely enumeration POV, I've always assumed that the core of any generation consists of all the cohorts outside the cusps.  A cusp of more than 3 or 4 years on each end of a generation tends to dilute the idea of 'generation' to the point it ceases to be meaningful.  That should typically leave a solid 14 years of core members.  NOTE: Anthony's "core" is a subset of the core cohorts.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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#4
Indisputably GI: 1901-1921
GI/Silent cusp: 1922-1927
Indisputably Silent: 1928-1941
Silent/Boomer cusp: 1942-1945
Indisputably Boomer: 1946-1960
Boomer/X cusp: 1961-1964
Indisputably Gen X: 1965-1976
X/Millennial cusp: 1977-1980
Indisputably Millennial: 1981-1994
Millennial/Z cusp: 1995-2001
Indisputably Gen Z: 2002+
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#5
(09-02-2016, 10:07 PM)gabrielle Wrote: I always thought that the "core" of a generation simply meant those that were born in the middle years.  For example, Boomers born from 1948 to 1955, Gen X from 1966 to 1976--give or take a year or two.

Most sources will agree that 1946-1947 and 1956-1960 are undeniably Boomer years.

1965 is undeniably an X year.
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#6
Core boomers: late '40s - early '50s, the student rioters of 1968
Core Xers: the 1970s in general?
Core millennials: late '80s - early '90s
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#7
I'd disagree with 1977-79 being core X. They aren't yet indisputably X (like people born in 1965-1976 are).

They are definitely X, but late X.
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#8
(10-21-2018, 10:42 AM)Ghost Wrote: Indisputably GI: 1901-1921
GI/Silent cusp: 1922-1927
Indisputably Silent: 1928-1941
Silent/Boomer cusp: 1942-1945
Indisputably Boomer: 1946-1960
Boomer/X cusp: 1961-1964
Indisputably Gen X: 1965-1976
X/Millennial cusp: 1977-1980
Indisputably Millennial: 1981-1994
Millennial/Z cusp: 1995-2001
Indisputably Gen Z: 2002+

FWIW, these look right to me.  I'm 1947, but have friends from '44-'46 that are certainly cuspers.  My wife ('59) is almost a true Reactive, but some of that is due to her being a young mother.  My son ('77) is cusp but heavily Xer.  My DIL ('79) is much more Millie, but still certainly X.  My Grandchildren are 2004, and Artists to the hilt.
Intelligence is not knowledge and knowledge is not wisdom, but they all play well together.
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#9
Indisputably GI: 1904-1921
GI/Silent cusp: 1922-1926
Indisputably Silent: 1927-1940
Silent/Boomer cusp: 1941-1945
Indisputably Boomer: 1946-1957
Boomer/X cusp: 1958-1964
Indisputably Gen X: 1965-1978
X/Millennial cusp: 1979-1983
Indisputably Millennial: 1984-1999
Millennial/Z cusp: 2000-2004
Indisputably Gen Z: 2005+


That would be my guess. This would be more in accord with Strauss and Howe and less with demographic definitions and the polling firms like Pew Research.

Of course "indisputable" would not be a correct term then, so it would be "core." I think of the cusps as a short period, not as long as a core period. Changes do not happen gradually in life or evolution.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#10
(10-22-2018, 05:22 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: Indisputably GI: 1904-1921
GI/Silent cusp: 1922-1926
Indisputably Silent: 1927-1940
Silent/Boomer cusp: 1941-1945
Indisputably Boomer: 1946-1957
Boomer/X cusp: 1958-1964
Indisputably Gen X: 1965-1978
X/Millennial cusp: 1979-1983
Indisputably Millennial: 1984-1999
Millennial/Z cusp: 2000-2004
Indisputably Gen Z: 2005+


That would be my guess. This would be more in accord with Strauss and Howe and less with demographic definitions and the polling firms like Pew Research.

Of course "indisputable" would not be a correct term then, so it would be "core." I think of the cusps as a short period, not as long as a core period. Changes do not happen gradually in life or evolution.
1927 isn't indisputably silent; they were 18 when WWII ended.

1958 is definitely the first Boomer/X cusp year; the birth rates started to decline in 1958, so it would make a lot of sense that 1958-1964 is the Boomer/X cusp.

1977 and 1978 aren't really indisputably X; Newsweek and Post-Bulletin still label them as Millennials and some still believe that they are in the cusp (which probably lasts until 1981 - the last birthyear that has people graduating in the 90's). 

1995-2001 is a big Millennial/Z cusp and even that could be outdated nowadays.
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#11
(11-03-2018, 09:25 PM)Ghost Wrote: 1977 and 1978 aren't really indisputably X; Newsweek and Post-Bulletin still label them as Millennials and some still believe that they are in the cusp (which probably lasts until 1981 - the last birthyear that has people graduating in the 90's). 

The Business Insider proposes Xennial as a cusp micro-generation between 1977 and 1985. I agree and identify as a Xennial myself.

Quote:1995-2001 is a big Millennial/Z cusp and even that could be outdated nowadays.

Do you think it should be moved forward or backward?

I used to debate it a lot on Personality Cafe. The only thing the 1995 camp had to say was "Internet Explorer was launched in 1995". Well, it didn't have much impact on politics or even daily life, did it? Social media (MySpace) got popular in 2006, so if you were born in 2001 or earlier you have to remember the pre-social Unravelling days. Also, 2006 was the year a civil war broke out in Iraq between the Shias and the Sunnis, which ended the Unravelling optimism about the whole world becoming democratic. In his Decision Points Bush claims this was also the year nativism became popular again. So I say: the crisis started in 2006 and thus it's reasonable to end Millennials in 2001 or even 2003.
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#12
(11-04-2018, 06:29 AM)Bill the Piper Wrote:
(11-03-2018, 09:25 PM)Ghost Wrote: 1977 and 1978 aren't really indisputably X; Newsweek and Post-Bulletin still label them as Millennials and some still believe that they are in the cusp (which probably lasts until 1981 - the last birthyear that has people graduating in the 90's). 

The Business Insider proposes Xennial as a cusp micro-generation between 1977 and 1985. I agree and identify as a Xennial myself.

Quote:1995-2001 is a big Millennial/Z cusp and even that could be outdated nowadays.

Do you think it should be moved forward or backward?

I used to debate it a lot on Personality Cafe. The only thing the 1995 camp had to say was "Internet Explorer was launched in 1995". Well, it didn't have much impact on politics or even daily life, did it? Social media (MySpace) got popular in 2006, so if you were born in 2001 or earlier you have to remember the pre-social Unravelling days. Also, 2006 was the year a civil war broke out in Iraq between the Shias and the Sunnis, which ended the Unravelling optimism about the whole world becoming democratic. In his Decision Points Bush claims this was also the year nativism became popular again. So I say: the crisis started in 2006 and thus it's reasonable to end Millennials in 2001 or even 2003.

Most sources I have seen believe that 1982-1985 are Millennial years and that 1977-1979 are X years. 1980 and 1981 are the only years that are really tricky. However, you see more sources citing 1980 as an X year and 1981 as a Millennial year.

I have a feeling that 1995-1999 will become firmly Millennial years as time passes.

2001 has a lot of "lasts":

*Last to be born before 9/11 (most of them)

*Last to graduate high school in the 2010's

*Last to be at elementary school when the iPhone came out

*Last to spend most of their elementary school years in the 2000's

*Used as an ending point of Millennials when the term "Echo Boomers" is used; usually Echo Boomers is defined as 1983 to 2001.



2003 also has even more "lasts":

*Last to be at high school in the time of the Parkland shooting.
*Probably the last that may remember VHS.
*Last to be at elementary school when the Great Recession started to take effect.
*Last to be at elementary school when electropop exploded.
*Last to enter elementary school when Bush was still the president.
*Last to be able to drive in the 2010's.
*Last to be born in the early 2000's.
*Last to spend most of their elementary school years before smartphone adoption hit 50%.
*Last to be able to legally consume alcohol in the first half of the 2020's.
*Last to become teenagers when Obama was still president.


But yet again, we may never know what lies ahead in the future.
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#13
(11-04-2018, 08:28 AM)Ghost Wrote: Most sources I have seen believe that 1982-1985 are Millennial years

To use a non US-centric approach, those cohorts went to elementary school when the Soviet Union still existed and Thatcher was the British PM. They also were firmly adults before the iPhone came out. Some good reasons to classify them as Xennials, apart from what I wrote in the previous post. But time will tell. Note how the G.I. generation is usually started in 1901, despite the fact that the youngest people who could remember the Missionary awakening were born around 1904.
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#14
(10-22-2018, 05:22 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: Indisputably GI: 1904-1921
GI/Silent cusp: 1922-1926
Indisputably Silent: 1927-1940
Silent/Boomer cusp: 1941-1945
Indisputably Boomer: 1946-1957
Boomer/X cusp: 1958-1964
Indisputably Gen X: 1965-1978
X/Millennial cusp: 1979-1983
Indisputably Millennial: 1984-1999
Millennial/Z cusp: 2000-2004
Indisputably Gen Z: 2005+


That would be my guess. This would be more in accord with Strauss and Howe and less with demographic definitions and the polling firms like Pew Research.

Of course "indisputable" would not be a correct term then, so it would be "core." I think of the cusps as a short period, not as long as a core period. Changes do not happen gradually in life or evolution.
How do we make this the official classification timeline?
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#15
Cuspers... those who were less than two years old when a shaping event (JFK assassinated, WW2 ending) happened, don't remember it at all. Those below a certain age remember it vaguely. But what is this certain age, and why? (Their individual intelligence also matters - some kids are a year ahead, some are a year behind.)
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