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Disney movies by era and intended audience
#1
Silent-intended (Golden Age):

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves
Pinocchio
Fantasia
Dumbo
Bambi
Saludos Amigos!
The Three Cabelleros
Make Mine Music
Fun and Fancy Free
Melody Time
The Adventures of Ichabod & Mr Toad

Boomer-intended (Silver Age):

Cinderella
Alice in Wonderland
Peter Pan
Lady and the Tramp
Sleeping Beauty
101 Dalmatians 
The Sword in the Stone
The Jungle Book

Xer-intended (Dark Age):

The Aristo-Cats
Robin Hood
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
The Rescuers
The Fox and the Hound
The Black Cauldron
The Great Mouse Detective
Oliver & Company

Millennial-intended (Renaissance/Modern Age):

The Little Mermaid
The Rescuers Down Under
Beauty and the Beast
Aladdin
The Lion King
Pocahontas 
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Hercules
Mulan
Tarzan
Fantasia 2000
Dinosaur
The Emperor’s New Groove
Atlantis: The Lost Empire
Lilo & Stitch
Treasure Planet
Brother Bear
Home on the Range
Chicken Little
Meet the Robinsons
Bolt
The Princess and the Frog

New Silent-intended (Revival):

Tangled
Winnie the Pooh
Wreck-It Ralph
Frozen
Big Hero 6
Zootopia
Moana
Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2
Frozen 2
Gigantic
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#2
Let us remember that Disney owns Pixar... the Toy Story series looks designed for the Millennial generation. Zootopia -- predatory animals like tigers and wolves getting along with rabbits? seems to have a communitarian ethos (but that as much fits young Millennial and young Zed -- young Civic and young Adaptive generations are raised much alike). Inside Out? A child is miserable in the transition between one tight-knit community until she latches onto another. Cars? It has some autumnal treatment of the GI Generation and its world.

...I expected the logical sequel to "Cars" to be "Boats" or "Airplanes"...
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#3
(11-18-2018, 12:40 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Let us remember that Disney owns Pixar... the Toy Story series looks designed for the Millennial generation. Zootopia -- predatory animals like tigers and wolves getting along with rabbits? seems to have a communitarian ethos (but that as much fits young Millennial and young Zed -- young Civic and young Adaptive generations are raised much alike). Inside Out? A child is miserable in the transition between one tight-knit community until she latches onto another. Cars? It has some autumnal treatment of the GI Generation and its world.

...I expected the logical sequel to "Cars" to be "Boats" or "Airplanes"...

The only reason I didn’t include the Pixar movies (which I love BTW) is because I believe they’re deserving of their own separate list. I’m not sure at what point Pixar went from targeting Millennial to New Silent children primarily.
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#4
I would add Mary Poppins & the Shaggy Dog 2 the Boomer list. Fantasia may not have been intended 4 Boomers but we sure partied 2 it!

Also Tron 4 Xers
Heart  Bernie/Tulsi 2020    Heart
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#5
Fantasia is the one effort that Walt Disney made at ars gratia artis. It was a box-office flop, and Disney thought that he could add and subtract as needed to keep the project relevant. Disney Corporation, long after Walt's death, created a largely new manifestation (keeping the 'Sorcerer's Apprentice" scene and working in the introduction by Deems Taylor, to the basic effect

The three types of classical music are

1. overtly programmatic music, music intended to tell a story (Paul Dukas' Sorcerr's Apprentice)
2. music that though not overtly programmatic, suggests distinct actions or images (Beethoven's Sixth, or Pastoral Symphony, which Disney used as background for cavorting characters of Greco-Roman mythology)
3. music for its own sake to be appreciated for its structure, counterpoint, virtuosity, etc. -- Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor.

The Bach work is the start

Were I setting up such a cinematic imagery I might pick

1. as overtly programmatic work, Smetana's The Moldau, a colorful depiction of the course of a river
2. not intentionally programmatic, but creating its own images, Maurice Ravel's Le Tombeau de Couperin
3. music with no imaginable program such as the Concert piece for four horns and orchestra by Robert Schumann

... with some Handel, Mozart, Mahler, Sibelius, and Prokofiev slipped in... "Goofy" somehow needs to make an appearance, right?

Of course, I digress as there is an impressive Fantasia 2000 that is good. What's wrong with another one twenty years later? There's no shortage of great music, and no shortage of talented animators.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#6
I'm not sure I would categorize the Jungle Book as a Boomer movie.  

It was released in 1967, so the target age group would have been Gen Jones, not Boomers per se.  Most Boomers were too old for it, so it didn't really affect their generation much.  Moreover, it was re-released in theaters for core-Gen X and Gen Y in 1978, 1984 and 1990.  

It was extremely popular, and its 1978 run more than doubled its initial earnings to surpass Snow White and the Seven Dwarves as the highest grossing animated film to that day.  So I think it really belongs to Gen X.  

I know, too, that I'm being possessive--it was my favorite Disney movie as a kid.  I saw it in 1978 when I was 6 or 7. 

The Jungle Book's seemingly well sourced wiki page
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#7
The Gen X era may have been a "dark age" for Disney films, but that was largely because their genius creator, Walt Disney, was no longer producing the films and it took them a while to regain their footing.

If you look beyond Disney to other children's films of the era, I don't think Gen X fared that badly.  We had the original Star Wars trilogy (yes, they were kids' films, Lucas said so), Indiana Jones, ET, the Black Stallion etc.
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#8
But those were late in the era.

Did The Jungle Book show the sort of life anyone would want a child to lead?

Was Bedknobs and Broomsticks really for children? 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea?  The smart kids watched 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Not Disney, but was Chitty Chitty Bang-Bang that good?
Doctor Doolittle (even if it had Rex Harrison as the star)?
The sugar-craving children of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory?
The Blue Bird was meant to be stylish and sophisticated -- a huge bomb.

The saccharine Sound of Music is about the most blatant cinematic Kitsch of all time. Face it -- it is set in Salzburg, Austria, home of what may have been the greatest composer of all time -- and there is no allusion to him.  After that one, the Production Code vanished, and there started to be G (rarely sought), PG, M (quickly becoming R), and X (eventually NC-17, mostly pornography).
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#9
(11-21-2018, 01:11 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: But those were late in the era.

I was just about the right age for those films, and I was born right in the middle of Gen X.

Quote:Did The Jungle Book show the sort of life anyone would want a child to lead?

Well, it was about an orphan raised in the jungle by wild animals, so I'm going to go out on a limb and say no.  But the film is a Disney fantasy, and it becomes a playful frolic.  Mowgli wanders off alone sometimes and gets into scrapes along the way, and learns he cannot always trust the adults.  Eventually the frolic is over and he must "grow up" and return to the human village.
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#10
(11-21-2018, 09:55 AM)gabrielle Wrote:
(11-21-2018, 01:11 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: But those were late in the era.

I was just about the right age for those films, and I was born right in the middle of Gen X.

Quote:Did The Jungle Book show the sort of life anyone would want a child to lead?

Well, it was about an orphan raised in the jungle by wild animals, so I'm going to go out on a limb and say no.  But the film is a Disney fantasy, and it becomes a playful frolic.  Mowgli wanders off alone sometimes and gets into scrapes along the way, and learns he cannot always trust the adults.  Eventually the frolic is over and he must "grow up" and return to the human village.

It's also Kipling. Mowgli is an orphan because the man-eating tiger Shere Khan has killed the boy's parents. He's the inverse of the domestication of the wolf, being taken in by wolves who eventually find him useful. Maybe the wolves are safer by day from Shere Khan because Mowgli can see the striped death that would kill wolves as prey.

See also Romulus and Remus, legendary founders of Rome, taken in by wolves.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#11
(11-20-2018, 09:36 PM)gabrielle Wrote: The Gen X era may have been a "dark age" for Disney films, but that was largely because their genius creator, Walt Disney, was no longer producing the films and it took them a while to regain their footing.

If you look beyond Disney to other children's films of the era, I don't think Gen X fared that badly.  We had the original Star Wars trilogy (yes, they were kids' films, Lucas said so), Indiana Jones, ET, the Black Stallion etc.

Star Wars IV is extremely violent and depicts the most horrible crime possible: genocide. It is a repackaged WWII movie. I may love the climactic scene in Raiders of the Lost Ark in which the Nazis open the Ark of the Covenant and face the greatest power that they could ever unleash -- the Wrath of God -- upon themselves. At the least it is Nazis who die.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#12
For some reason I assumed that by "Dark Age" the original poster meant a time of uninspired or lesser quality of films.  TBH, I don't think there were very many good Disney films between the Jungle Book and the Little Mermaid.  

But yes, the Star Wars and Indiana Jones films could be rather dark, in the moral sense of the word.
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#13
(11-21-2018, 10:38 PM)gabrielle Wrote: For some reason I assumed that by "Dark Age" the original poster meant a time of uninspired or lesser quality of films.  TBH, I don't think there were very many good Disney films between the Jungle Book and the Little Mermaid.  

But yes, the Star Wars and Indiana Jones films could be rather dark, in the moral sense of the word.

The money just wasn't put into movies clearly for children.

I think that we have neglected the films of "Japan's Disney", Hayao Miyazaki.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#14
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_Picture_Code

Hays code dumped during early Awakening.
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#15
(11-22-2018, 02:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: The money just wasn't put into movies clearly for children.

The "awakening" had some benighted moments.

Probably just as well, for me.  My parents didn't take my brother and I to the movies very often, and I had to develop my imagination to entertain myself.  I did a lot of reading, drawing, and playing in the woods.
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#16
(11-22-2018, 08:51 PM)gabrielle Wrote:
(11-22-2018, 02:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: The money just wasn't put into movies clearly for children.

The "awakening" had some benighted moments.

Probably just as well, for me.  My parents didn't take my brother and I to the movies very often, and I had to develop my imagination to entertain myself.  I did a lot of reading, drawing, and playing in the woods.

Which may have been just as well. There were some great movies that got R (Bonnie and Clyde, Easy Rider) even X ratings (A Clockwork Orange, Midnight Cowboy), but they definitely were not for children and still aren't. Probably the only movie from that time that one could take the whole family to see was Fiddler on the Roof, which was anti-Awakening and successful in defending family as any movie of the time.

As Tim Walker reminds us:

[/url]
Quote:[url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_Picture_Code]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_Picture_Code

Hays code dumped during early Awakening.

The Hays code ensured that movies had to be made for omnibus audiences. It may now be that omnibus entertainment has become best for winning audiences -- and economic pressures are even more effective than regulation or industry norms in supporting a tendency.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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#17
(11-21-2018, 01:28 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: See also Romulus and Remus, legendary founders of Rome, taken in by wolves.

Some people claim that "she-wolf" was a euphemism for "prostitute". Making them a pair of true sonuvabitches.

And if the world will be still standing then, and the cycles still turning, the next Nomad generation will be true wolf kids. Poor devils.
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#18
(02-06-2019, 11:47 AM)Hintergrund Wrote: the next Nomad generation will be true wolf kids. Poor devils.

Why???
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#19
(02-06-2019, 12:12 PM)Bill the Piper Wrote:
(02-06-2019, 11:47 AM)Hintergrund Wrote: the next Nomad generation will be true wolf kids. Poor devils.

Why???

Did you read the chapter about the last "Awakening", and especially "Rosemary's Baby" about child 13th / X-ers? S&H quote kids who were allowed to play with the bongs and sex toys of their parents, were allowed to play "truth or dare" with their parents' sex life. I heard from my parents how toddlers at that time (in Europe) would smear their excrements to the wall, and the (probably Silent, maybe Boomer) parents wouldn't say anything. Maybe they expected that their brats would become great artists.

If you look at history, things seem to escalate. If the Homelanders (as a reaction to Helicopter parents of today) become even more extreme, they won't even move a finger if their future kids get bitten by the family dog. Or worse.

That's why: Wolf children. (And if you consider that many women became sluts and whores during the "sexual revolution", and the double meaning of "bitch", and (as mentioned) that she-wolf might have referred to a prostitute as well, it fits too.)
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