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Good Girl's Revolt
#21
(11-01-2016, 02:26 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: I have to agree with Disaster in one sense. It is true the Boomers fought for the freedom for their kids to have lots of choices about lifestyles, sexual identity, careers ... generally, they tried to make it so their kids would not face discrimination. But on the flip side, by being Helicopter Parents, they have raised up some fairly boring and risk averse people. So, in spite of trying to pave the path for permanent sustainability for the fruits of the 2T Social Revolution, they raised up a bunch of robots.

In my experience the helicoptering has been far more of an Xer parent thing (over-compensating for being neglected as kids) than a Boomer parent thing.

But I grew up in a working class rural area, which are some of the last places to be penetrated by social changes started by affluent college-educated urban people.
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#22
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Yeah, my parents always jokingly told me about all the screw-ups they made because they didn't want me to repeat the same mistakes.
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#23
Why do Millennials laugh at passion though? Why is it so cool for them not to care? That's what I don't understand
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#24
(11-01-2016, 02:35 PM)taramarie Wrote: I mean I do not know if other generations call the American millies culturally dead. They certainly do here in NZ towards us millies. Rule desiring, culturally numb, dead and drawn to create things together and with it loosing individual creativity is the fear of older folk from my experience as a creative millennial being in a class of other fellow creative millennials.

For me, what made me risk taking was being blocked at every avenue because everything was made to be perfect. Everything was deemed too risky or too nonconventional to try and I failed whenever I tried to do things the "perfect" Millennial way. When I didn't I pushed forward. All the "safe" things in my life failed me and all the supposed experts had no answers and I had to find them myself.

I also observed what happens when you have people so paranoid and scared in your life that nothing happens and nothing moves forward. Sometimes people neglect to take risks so much that it's more of a risk in the end because no move is made and it's too late. I've seen what happens when people neglected to do anything because they thought everything was a "scam" or everything was out to get them and have long term outcomes suffer because they'd rather not take the risk and think you should just accept the hand life dealt you.

I don't understand why my generation seems to think that it's better to just accept a negative outcome than do unconventional and risky things to get out of something. It's like they want to wait for everything to be proven by 20 years before they even make a move. They have this sense of fatalism about them and think there's a lot of things that have no easy answer and can't be fixed. So they like to warn you and say you're never gonna do this or that. It's like they take joy and pleasure in discouragement.
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#25
(11-02-2016, 09:37 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:26 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: I have to agree with Disaster in one sense. It is true the Boomers fought for the freedom for their kids to have lots of choices about lifestyles, sexual identity, careers ... generally, they tried to make it so their kids would not face discrimination. But on the flip side, by being Helicopter Parents, they have raised up some fairly boring and risk averse people. So, in spite of trying to pave the path for permanent sustainability for the fruits of the 2T Social Revolution, they raised up a bunch of robots.

In my experience the helicoptering has been far more of an Xer parent thing (over-compensating for being neglected as kids) than a Boomer parent thing.

But I grew up in a working class rural area, which are some of the last places to be penetrated by social changes started by affluent college-educated urban people.
The I am definitely out of the norm. Never noticed other millies my age being helicoptered. But me oh yeah I was helicoptered. It was annoying because I desired my mother to raise me like other millies my age. She was considered abnormal in that respect.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#26
(11-02-2016, 09:39 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Yeah, my parents always jokingly told me about all the screw-ups they made because they didn't want me to repeat the same mistakes.

My mother never did that. She told me her past and i observed her present actions and saw the screw ups and vowed never to do that.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#27
(11-02-2016, 02:05 PM)disasterzone Wrote: Why do Millennials laugh at passion though? Why is it so cool for them not to care? That's what I don't understand

Why do you take a massive generation and overgeneralize for the actions of a few? THAT I really do not understand. As for laughing at passion they either are laughing at the idiocy of the person who is passionate, see their elders in that person (who are rather passionate on average regarding being the culture shakers that they are) or they really do not care. I mean seriously, why don't you go and ask them yourself? I can only guess for you.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#28
(11-02-2016, 02:10 PM)disasterzone Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:35 PM)taramarie Wrote: I mean I do not know if other generations call the American millies culturally dead. They certainly do here in NZ towards us millies. Rule desiring, culturally numb, dead and drawn to create things together and with it loosing individual creativity is the fear of older folk from my experience as a creative millennial being in a class of other fellow creative millennials.

For me, what made me risk taking was being blocked at every avenue because everything was made to be perfect. Everything was deemed too risky or too nonconventional to try and I failed whenever I tried to do things the "perfect" Millennial way. When I didn't I pushed forward. All the "safe" things in my life failed me and all the supposed experts had no answers and I had to find them myself.

I also observed what happens when you have people so paranoid and scared in your life that nothing happens and nothing moves forward. Sometimes people neglect to take risks so much that it's more of a risk in the end because no move is made and it's too late. I've seen what happens when people neglected to do anything because they thought everything was a "scam" or everything was out to get them and have long term outcomes suffer because they'd rather not take the risk and think you should just accept the hand life dealt you.

I don't understand why my generation seems to think that it's better to just accept a negative outcome than do unconventional and risky things to get out of something. It's like they want to wait for everything to be proven by 20 years before they even make a move. They have this sense of fatalism about them and think there's a lot of things that have no easy answer and can't be fixed. So they like to warn you and say you're never gonna do this or that. It's like they take joy and pleasure in discouragement.

Failed you? How? Did it make you not prepared for work?

While I am generally a person who avoids risk for many reasons I do see your point. My mother was out of the norm when it came to boomer parenting. She raised me like a militant Xer more than anything. She made me terrified to do anything on my own or to take steps out of my comfort zone.

Many do not want to leave the comfort zone for reasons I have already mentioned above if you can read between the lines of for example, my life. My life became the way to raise younger millies as time progressed. We are used to being protected from danger and we have seen the negative consequences of too much risky behaviour. When we were growing up negative consequences were mowed out the way and so we never developed the skills to deal with negative consequences when compared on average to older folk who were raised a different way. There will of course be some who do not fit the mold but there are majority parenting trends that are more popular at the time and those I observe. Now do you understand?
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#29
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Do think you being ISFJ has anything to do with your attitude towards risk.

I think ISFJs are generally the most risk averse of all the types, their preference seems to be outward stability and predictability.

My own life as a INTP has been very scattered and exploratory, from wanting to be an artist/illustrator as a child, dropping out of high school to working security to joining the navy. Then studying such disparate subjects as Heating and Air, Graphic Design, and Culinary Arts. I still don't have any stability in my life. Big Grin
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#30
(11-02-2016, 09:49 PM)Emman85 Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Do think you being ISFJ has anything to do with your attitude towards risk.

I think ISFJs are generally the most risk averse of all the types, their preference seems to be outward stability and predictability.

My own life as a INTP has been very scattered and exploratory, from wanting to be an artist/illustrator as a child, dropping out of high school to working security to joining the navy. Then studying such disparate subjects as Heating and Air, Graphic Design, and Culinary Arts. I still don't have any stability in my life. Big Grin

Partly yes I would say it would. But how I was raised also participates with risk aversion being smothered and risk being eliminated for me. I did not develop the skills to really deal with it. But I do agree being ISFJ would be part of the reason I am risk adverse.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#31
(11-01-2016, 02:35 PM)taramarie Wrote: I mean I do not know if other generations call the American millies culturally dead. They certainly do here in NZ towards us millies. Rule desiring, culturally numb, dead and drawn to create things together and with it loosing individual creativity is the fear of older folk from my experience as a creative millennial being in a class of other fellow creative millennials.

The fear of older people actually made me more prepared to take on risk. Because I knew they would go ballistic and crazy at everything, it made me able to keep more secrets and get more things done myself. If something got out of control, I had to handle it behind the scenes to not face their reaction. So I learned to rebel and do things without people knowing. It also taught me how to calculate risks. Typically the risks were lower than they told me it would be.
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#32
(11-02-2016, 03:16 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 09:39 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Yeah, my parents always jokingly told me about all the screw-ups they made because they didn't want me to repeat the same mistakes.

My mother never did that. She told me her past and i observed her present actions and saw the screw ups and vowed never to do that.

Well they think everything's been done to the point they'd rather do nothing. Why is doing nothing preferable to something?

Also when something hasn't been done and you suggest it, they look at you like you're nuts and prefer to do things the "safe" way even if it will yield fewer returns. They seem to need tons of examples and tons of years of studies before attempting anything. Or they shoot down ideas and say people would have tried it if it worked or think it's not grounded in reality. It's like possibility, vision, and imagination are lost amongst them and they have such trust in the official institutions that they seem to think any alternative is quackery or crazy.
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#33
(11-03-2016, 10:09 AM)disasterzone Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:35 PM)taramarie Wrote: I mean I do not know if other generations call the American millies culturally dead. They certainly do here in NZ towards us millies. Rule desiring, culturally numb, dead and drawn to create things together and with it loosing individual creativity is the fear of older folk from my experience as a creative millennial being in a class of other fellow creative millennials.

The fear of older people actually made me more prepared to take on risk. Because I knew they would go ballistic and crazy at everything, it made me able to keep more secrets and get more things done myself. If something got out of control, I had to handle it behind the scenes to not face their reaction. So I learned to rebel and do things without people knowing. It also taught me how to calculate risks. Typically the risks were lower than they told me it would be.
I just tell these people (usually xers) that unless they quit thinking we read minds or are too cryptic do not assume we will do things their way. If they want us to do it their way they have to tell us bluntly. People in my group were panicking because they were not told to do it on their own. Not the first time that has happened.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#34
(11-03-2016, 10:13 AM)disasterzone Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 03:16 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 09:39 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Yeah, my parents always jokingly told me about all the screw-ups they made because they didn't want me to repeat the same mistakes.

My mother never did that. She told me her past and i observed her present actions and saw the screw ups and vowed never to do that.

Well they think everything's been done to the point they'd rather do nothing. Why is doing nothing preferable to something?

Also when something hasn't been done and you suggest it, they look at you like you're nuts and prefer to do things the "safe" way even if it will yield fewer returns. They seem to need tons of examples and tons of years of studies before attempting anything. Or they shoot down ideas and say people would have tried it if it worked or think it's not grounded in reality. It's like possibility, vision, and imagination are lost amongst them and they have such trust in the official institutions that they seem to think any alternative is quackery or crazy.
I feel like you must be younger than me yet this is not the first time this older civic has been asked about our own generation. I cannot help but think this is amusing.

Ok, the answer...they are still figuring out the safest/tried and true strategy or alternative. This is why they love feedback from their friends on things they have tried that worked. It is someone trustworthy who says something yields positive results.

I think that answers all of the questions. Btw I also am guilty of doing years and years of study. I am in for a few more in fact first in advanced animation then film direction. I already have a few certs and a Bachelor degree. So I can answer this one too. For me, I tried to get out there and get work. But was told to get some work experience (which I am doing) and told to go back and get some more education. So I am doing that too now. As for ideas grounded in reality, if it does not sound like it will work it is a waste of time. As for the "safe" route I mentioned elsewhere why millies overall tend to prefer the safe route. They do not have the skills to deal with failure, strategy or mentally. It devastates them....more so if on their own. This is due to how they were raised. Nod to helicopter parenting. I know this from experience.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#35
(11-03-2016, 10:13 AM)disasterzone Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 03:16 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 09:39 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:32 PM)taramarie Wrote: We are probably boring because in comparison to other generations we are culturally dead. How can you compete with what has already been done? As for risk adverse that would also help to make us pretty boring in comparison but it is better than replaying the idiot decisions that some older folk have made. I have seen the consequences of what risk taking has done and like hell I would repeat it.

Yeah, my parents always jokingly told me about all the screw-ups they made because they didn't want me to repeat the same mistakes.

My mother never did that. She told me her past and i observed her present actions and saw the screw ups and vowed never to do that.

Well they think everything's been done to the point they'd rather do nothing. Why is doing nothing preferable to something?

Also when something hasn't been done and you suggest it, they look at you like you're nuts and prefer to do things the "safe" way even if it will yield fewer returns. They seem to need tons of examples and tons of years of studies before attempting anything. Or they shoot down ideas and say people would have tried it if it worked or think it's not grounded in reality. It's like possibility, vision, and imagination are lost amongst them and they have such trust in the official institutions that they seem to think any alternative is quackery or crazy.

Or maybe they know that your idea is bonkers and BS and you are too thick-headed and self-absorbed to get the clue they are trying to give you because you think everyone is a dumb sheep? Rolleyes

Seriously, the problem isn't with other people, the problem is with you. Get a damn psychotherapist.
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#36
(11-03-2016, 03:04 PM)taramarie Wrote: I feel like you must be younger than me yet this is not the first time this older civic has been asked about our own generation. I cannot help but think this is amusing.

Ok, the answer...they are still figuring out the safest/tried and true strategy or alternative. This is why they love feedback from their friends on things they have tried that worked. It is someone trustworthy who says something yields positive results.

I think that answers all of the questions. Btw I also am guilty of doing years and years of study. I am in for a few more in fact first in advanced animation then film direction. I already have a few certs and a Bachelor degree. So I can answer this one too. For me, I tried to get out there and get work. But was told to get some work experience (which I am doing) and told to go back and get some more education. So I am doing that too now. As for ideas grounded in reality, if it does not sound like it will work it is a waste of time. As for the "safe" route I mentioned elsewhere why millies overall tend to prefer the safe route. They do not have the skills to deal with failure, strategy or mentally. It devastates them....more so if on their own. This is due to how they were raised. Nod to helicopter parenting. I know this from experience.

To be honest I think he has narcissism issues and thinks anyone who thinks that his shit don't stink is a "dumb mindless sheep". He's like an edgy teenager who never grew up, a grown up Holden Caufield who still thinks everyone around him is a "phony".
#MakeTheDemocratsGreatAgain
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#37
(11-02-2016, 09:37 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:26 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: I have to agree with Disaster in one sense. It is true the Boomers fought for the freedom for their kids to have lots of choices about lifestyles, sexual identity, careers ... generally, they tried to make it so their kids would not face discrimination. But on the flip side, by being Helicopter Parents, they have raised up some fairly boring and risk averse people. So, in spite of trying to pave the path for permanent sustainability for the fruits of the 2T Social Revolution, they raised up a bunch of robots.

In my experience the helicoptering has been far more of an Xer parent thing (over-compensating for being neglected as kids) than a Boomer parent thing.

But I grew up in a working class rural area, which are some of the last places to be penetrated by social changes started by affluent college-educated urban people.
I live in an upscale suburban area with a high concentration of college-educated parents and I've noticed the same thing;  the Xers tend to be the most protective of their kids.
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#38
(11-04-2016, 06:55 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-03-2016, 03:04 PM)taramarie Wrote: I feel like you must be younger than me yet this is not the first time this older civic has been asked about our own generation. I cannot help but think this is amusing.

Ok, the answer...they are still figuring out the safest/tried and true strategy or alternative. This is why they love feedback from their friends on things they have tried that worked. It is someone trustworthy who says something yields positive results.

I think that answers all of the questions. Btw I also am guilty of doing years and years of study. I am in for a few more in fact first in advanced animation then film direction. I already have a few certs and a Bachelor degree. So I can answer this one too. For me, I tried to get out there and get work. But was told to get some work experience (which I am doing) and told to go back and get some more education. So I am doing that too now. As for ideas grounded in reality, if it does not sound like it will work it is a waste of time. As for the "safe" route I mentioned elsewhere why millies overall tend to prefer the safe route. They do not have the skills to deal with failure, strategy or mentally. It devastates them....more so if on their own. This is due to how they were raised. Nod to helicopter parenting. I know this from experience.

To be honest I think he has narcissism issues and thinks anyone who thinks that his shit don't stink is a "dumb mindless sheep". He's like an edgy teenager who never grew up, a grown up Holden Caufield who still thinks everyone around him is a "phony".
Well I am not going to judge him or her guilty of something till I know the person more. I want to be fair and I want to educate this person more regarding our generation and help this person understand us a bit more (generally speaking) going by what was popular at the time. As this place is one for information I will provide that. I also do the same with others here till they say not so nice things to me or they have proven impossible to talk to and proven my suspicions (Eric) correct.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#39
(11-04-2016, 01:30 PM)The Wonkette Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 09:37 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-01-2016, 02:26 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: I have to agree with Disaster in one sense. It is true the Boomers fought for the freedom for their kids to have lots of choices about lifestyles, sexual identity, careers ... generally, they tried to make it so their kids would not face discrimination. But on the flip side, by being Helicopter Parents, they have raised up some fairly boring and risk averse people. So, in spite of trying to pave the path for permanent sustainability for the fruits of the 2T Social Revolution, they raised up a bunch of robots.

In my experience the helicoptering has been far more of an Xer parent thing (over-compensating for being neglected as kids) than a Boomer parent thing.

But I grew up in a working class rural area, which are some of the last places to be penetrated by social changes started by affluent college-educated urban people.
I live in an upscale suburban area with a high concentration of college-educated parents and I've noticed the same thing;  the Xers tend to be the most protective of their kids.
I was always envious of my friends because their boomer parents were not super restrictive protective. I remember clear as day asking if we could trade parents and my friends always looked horrified.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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#40
It seems the show has been cancelled.
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