Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Trick or Treating Tradition Fading Away
#21
(11-03-2016, 07:27 AM)Odin Wrote:
(11-02-2016, 04:14 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: In the case of our neighborhood the "parents-with-primary-school/pre-school-kids" tribe have their own little social network they used to invite other tribe members to their quasi-exclusive block party, held a couple of blocks from our house. They purposely made it exclusive and have no intention to invite the overall neighborhood. Of course I have my intel sources so in spite of not getting the word via the private social network, I still found out. It's been this way the past 3 - 4 years. Prior to that, things were normal. Along with some other comments here, I attribute the shift to a newer, younger group of parents - a mixture of younger Nintendo Xers and older Millies. They are so into the tribe thing. They have no concept of an overarching geographically defined community. In spite of many expressed "liberal" sentiments about diversity and inclusion, when it comes down to it, they like their tribe of a narrow range of cohort and residential living arrangements. They have purposely excluded, without being explicit about it, anyone who is not of their tribe.

I blame this on the current political polarization. People are voluntarily segregating themselves in order to limit exposure to people who disagree with them.

It isn't political, though.  Our school has both Trump supporters and Clinton supporters, and things like that still involve all the families who have kids in the relevant classes, irrespective of political leaning.  If anything, we catch a bit of flak from the school about our daughter being friends mostly with a specific set of other girls - not sorted by political leaning as far as I know - rather than being "friends" with everyone.
Reply
#22
(11-01-2016, 12:43 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: What I mean by Trick or Treating is actual, real Trick or Treating, where people walk down the street, knocking on doors of people who appear to be participating. When I was a kid the participation rate was well over 90%.

Last night we only got single digits of people at our place. We are in a suburb. It's a bit woodsy but it's not a standoffish McMansion place where people are discouraged from access to front doors. We live in a mix of individually built houses ranging from Edwardian to recent. Front doors are easy to get to and we do have street lights.

The reason we only got a handful of trick or treaters is instead of doing traditional trick or treating, the parents all got together in one place with their kids and had a closed party (well, not formally closed, but the idea was, all these people get together and do a sort of lame trick or treat only with each other). It was very tribal - "we are the 'parents-with-elementary-aged-kids' tribe. We won't knock on doors of members of other tribes."

I predict that at least in our corner of the Bay Area, some of the Homies will never know traditional Trick or Treating, and, the next generation of kids won't know it at all.
Trick or treating was very much alive in my neighborhood. We had hordes of children; tiny tots with their parents and groups of giggling 13-year-olds alone. We know we had at least 100 children (and almost as many adults). My fiancé and I joined our neighbors in bringing lawn chairs onto our front yards, having gops of candy, and drinking wine/pumpkin ale while the kids flocked to our little corner.

I participate in a neighborhood Facebook group. One resident actually kept track and ended up with 220 children! I don't think we had THAT many, but it could have been as high as 150.

They started coming as soon as the clock struck 6:00 pm. By 8:00 pm, it had petered out. My neighbors were still partying, but my fiancé and I were both getting chilly, plus Dancing with the Stars was on. I head that few kids came out between 8:00 and 8:30.
Reply
#23
I think the problem with "Trick-or-Treat"ing is that it really isn't a tradition that has deep roots. Indeed it was mostly a creation of post-war suburbia. The conditions that fostered that have faded away and it really can't survive outside of that environment so it must fade away.

What is telling though is that the Halloween party has made a come back in a big way, including those that involve children.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
Reply
#24
Sometimes I think that I was lucky to have been born when I was. When I was a kid I was able to enjoy the old style Halloween fun.
Reply
#25
I find it hilarious that someone would call a "tradition" that didn't exist before the early twentieth century is "old style" Halloween fun.
It really is all mathematics.

Turn on to Daddy, Tune in to Nationalism, Drop out of UN/NATO/WTO/TPP/NAFTA/CAFTA Globalism.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)