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Music and Generations
#1
Really interesting video where three film reviewers (all Xers) discuss the new Beastie Boys documentary and the group's legacy and how the Beastie Boys' music and story doesn't seem to resonate as much with younger people. Music from a specific era tends to resonate most deeply with those were there and came of age with it and those older and younger may not "get it" as much. I could see Boomers saying the same things about The Beatles or Stones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRotErV2Chs
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#2
http://philosopherswheel.com/flyaway.html

Who was the best rock music group ever? The Who, that's who. When did they become the best? In 1965, when they wrote and performed their great anthem, My Generation. Whose generation were they singing about? The baby boomers, who were born sometime during or after the big war until sometime before 1965. Why was the song so great? Because Pete wrote the catchy words and music and Roger performed it with swagger. And because no-one before had been so bold as to do a song about their whole generation. How could they claim that every girl and every guy in it was trying to cause a big sensation? This was a generalization about a generation. Were they the greatest generation? No, that was their parents who fought the war. Actually, no generation was the greatest, and since then every generation blames other generations for their own problems. But The Who's song helped make that possible by popularizing the idea that we could identify ourselves with a whole generation......
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#3
(05-22-2020, 04:33 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: http://philosopherswheel.com/flyaway.html

Who was the best rock music group ever? The Who, that's who. When did they become the best? In 1965, when they wrote and performed their great anthem, My Generation. Whose generation were they singing about? The baby boomers, who were born sometime during or after the big war until sometime before 1965. Why was the song so great? Because Pete wrote the catchy words and music and Roger performed it with swagger. And because no-one before had been so bold as to do a song about their whole generation. How could they claim that every girl and every guy in it was trying to cause a big sensation? This was a generalization about a generation. Were they the greatest generation? No, that was their parents who fought the war. Actually, no generation was the greatest, and since then every generation blames other generations for their own problems. But The Who's song helped make that possible by popularizing the idea that we could identify ourselves with a whole generation......
As one Boomer known as the Dude would say, "Well, that's just like, your opinion man."
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#4
(05-22-2020, 11:40 PM)GeekyCynic Wrote:
(05-22-2020, 04:33 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: http://philosopherswheel.com/flyaway.html

Who was the best rock music group ever? The Who, that's who. When did they become the best? In 1965, when they wrote and performed their great anthem, My Generation. Whose generation were they singing about? The baby boomers, who were born sometime during or after the big war until sometime before 1965. Why was the song so great? Because Pete wrote the catchy words and music and Roger performed it with swagger. And because no-one before had been so bold as to do a song about their whole generation. How could they claim that every girl and every guy in it was trying to cause a big sensation? This was a generalization about a generation. Were they the greatest generation? No, that was their parents who fought the war. Actually, no generation was the greatest, and since then every generation blames other generations for their own problems. But The Who's song helped make that possible by popularizing the idea that we could identify ourselves with a whole generation......
As one Boomer known as the Dude would say, "Well, that's just like, your opinion man."

I invite you to listen to the new who songs! See the link.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#5
(05-21-2020, 04:01 PM)GeekyCynic Wrote: Really interesting video where three film reviewers (all Xers) discuss the new Beastie Boys documentary and the group's legacy and how the Beastie Boys' music and story doesn't seem to resonate as much with younger people. Music from a specific era tends to resonate most deeply with those were there and came of age with it and those older and younger may not "get it" as much. I could see Boomers saying the same things about The Beatles or Stones. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRotErV2Chs

I agree and disagree, though. Younger people are more into music, take more time for it, and there's peer rewards for listening. Young people dominate you tube videos today, with billions of views for today's stars, but only millions for the most popular boomer and Xer songs.

I listen when I can to any music that comes along, but I think the Beatles/Stones era was in fact better than other pop eras. I can't help it if I came of age then. I have always listened to music, and have known what I liked. I can enjoy some pieces from any era. But I don't think our society and culture from the later 80s onward, or in the early 1950s, supported creative work in the field very well. The Reagan era deregulated radio, and the media consolidated. Creative folks were not encouraged; it was about selling to make the fastest buck. Younger people today reject the older music, and thus learn nothing from it. They resent boomers because they are boomers. OK boomer. That was less true in the past than it is today. Even the boomers, despite their famous slogan, and the silents too, were influenced a lot by the styles of the past, and still heard them on the radio too.

More recent pop styles just don't have as much content. Lots of loud screaching and screaming, angry rapping, distorted grunging, lots of sex parties, expressions of boredom and ennui and cynicism, but very little musical content in the melodies and sound arrangements. With some pretty good pieces around, of course, as well. It's a big world, and many Gen Xers created some great music way out on the fringes of the American pop scene and beyond, and many artists of all generations continue to do so.

So yes, I think the music I came of age with was better, but not all of it by any means. There has always been lots of lousy and mediocre pop music in every era, and there was even more bad pop music throughout my coming of age boomer-youth era than in the earlier pop eras, in fact. The most popular hits from my coming of age era are not all that great, really, overall, even compared to some later hits. Earlier pop culture had the advantage of expert jazz and big band musicians, and an abundance of romantic ballads and show tunes. See our thread about the best songs ever.

It's just that in the mid-sixties, and the 2T generally, there were more standout songs and works offered. There was a confluence of many competent studio musicians, many trained in the big band era and many others who developed in several US metros by producers ambitious to create great sounds, and many great pop cultures in other countries. The Beatles inspired many new bands to form. Rock music often aspired toward art. There was an attitude of experimentation, and there was the stimulus of mind expanding drugs, spiritual counter-cultures and movements, human potential movements and folk protest movements that inspired some artists to aim for the highest musical expression, as for example The Who, or Bob Dylan, The Byrds, etc.. Awakenings are times when creative expansion can occur. The other turnings in the USA tend to suppress this.

My top 400 from 1956-1977 with notes on and songs from other times too:
http://philosopherswheel.com/ericrock.html
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#6
One thing for sure, I don't "get" rap. The Beastie Boys are rap. It looks like they throw in some interesting video stuff and samples with their raps and such, but no, I don't git it. I would not have gotten it any better if I had been born 20 or 30 years later, assuming I was born with the same inherited and environmental childhood traits and cultural background I was given, and could have been given at any time. Being shouted at does not appeal.

Rap seems to me part of the general rejection and anger at boomer and older cultures. But if people from younger generations want to find common ground with boomers like me, there are other places to look.  The first place to look is here:
http://generational-theory.com/forum/thr...l#pid50898

I had a quarrel with teejay over this "great awakening" of the 1988-1995 period, more or less, since he used the fact of this later awakening era to say that Europe's 2T lasted from 1968 to 1989 or thereabouts, and stuck very stubbornly to this theory, and I rejected it. But that does not mean I rejected the actual awakening or creative outburst that occurred then, not at all. I was part of it. It just shows that not every such awakening occurs within the boundaries set by Strauss and Howe for "awakenings." In fact, as teejay confirmed by his description of this awakening as the "second summer of love," which many have called it, it was an echo of the earlier psychedelic and liberation era of the mid and late sixties. Awakenings as defined by S&H or by cultural historians reverberate in later years and are often revived and further developed in periods that are not explicitly second turnings. The modernist awakening at the turn of the 20th century certainly had its later expressions after 1908, for example. And the romantic movement straddled eras from the revolution 4T (mainly in Europe) through the transcendentalist era 2T in the USA and beyond.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply


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