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(05-29-2017, 04:18 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-28-2017, 07:10 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-28-2017, 02:18 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2017, 06:49 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: [ -> ]Zbigniew Brzezinski. I'll miss his generally-wise commentary.

You do realize that it was his ideas about Afghanistan in the wake of the Soviet occupation that led to our current situation with Al-Qaeda and ISIS.  He was as much of a destructive asshole as Kissinger was for pretty much the same reasons.

Unintended consequences can be horrible. Malign intent can do incomparably worse.

If you want to push culpability back, then you can blame the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

It would have been best to leave that one alone since Afghanistan is also known as the "Graveyard of Empires".  Carter screwed up because if he had learned the economics of Mises and Rothbard and understood the history of the region he would have known that Soviet occupation would have brought down the the Soviet Union anyway without the entertaining consequences we face today.

He is still culpable for giving bad advice.

Mises and Rothbard are not mainstream figures in the liberal world. Diplomacy does not rely upon economic ideas from fringe groups. People at most pick and choose between libertarian doctrines as fit their agendas. Giving all power to a 'free market' capable of doing anything to anybody because the power of economic elites engenders some vile behavior. Libertarianism would lead quickly to a pure plutocracy in which the rich would be allowed to do what they want because economic inequality and lack of recourse by people who own nothing would put the poor at the cruel whim of people devoid of conscience.

It may be paradoxical, but Brzezinski was one of the first mainstream figures (this was in the early 1980s) to recognize that the Communist order was doomed. I read the book, and it made sense. In reality, trends away from Marxism, rediscovery of religiion, and failures of the official economies doomed Communist rule or Marxist-Leninist economics. What is left of hard-line Communist rule with a highly socialist (Marxist-Leninist) economy is now... North Korea. Even if Communist Parties remain in charge in China, Cuba, and Vietnam the Parties have abandoned Marxism-Leninism if not dictatorial rule. I forget the title.

We all have our values. Economic gain is not worth mass human suffering.
(05-29-2017, 08:32 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-29-2017, 04:18 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-28-2017, 07:10 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-28-2017, 02:18 AM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-27-2017, 06:49 PM)Eric the Obtuse Wrote: [ -> ]Zbigniew Brzezinski. I'll miss his generally-wise commentary.

You do realize that it was his ideas about Afghanistan in the wake of the Soviet occupation that led to our current situation with Al-Qaeda and ISIS.  He was as much of a destructive asshole as Kissinger was for pretty much the same reasons.

Unintended consequences can be horrible. Malign intent can do incomparably worse.

If you want to push culpability back, then you can blame the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

It would have been best to leave that one alone since Afghanistan is also known as the "Graveyard of Empires".  Carter screwed up because if he had learned the economics of Mises and Rothbard and understood the history of the region he would have known that Soviet occupation would have brought down the the Soviet Union anyway without the entertaining consequences we face today.

He is still culpable for giving bad advice.

Mises and Rothbard are not mainstream figures in the liberal world.

It may be paradoxical, but Brzezinski was one of the first mainstream figures (this was in the early 1980s) to recognize that the Communist order was doomed. I read the book, and it made sense. In reality, trends away from Marxism, rediscovery of religiion,  and failures of the official economies doomed Communist rule or Marxist-Leninist economics. What is left of hard-line Communist rule with a highly socialist (Marxist-Leninist) economy is now... North Korea. Even if Communist Parties remain in charge in China, Cuba, and Vietnam the Parties have abandoned Marxism-Leninism if not dictatorial rule. I forget the title.

If you had actually bothered to read Mises then you would know that he predicted the failure of the Soviet decades before Carter or Brzezinski ever got around to it.  In his essay on the subject he predicted the failure mode and the methods the Soviet Union would use to try to keep its system going.  You would do well to remember that no nation can survive, let alone prosper, without a functioning economy.
Mises was not mainstream. People outside the mainstream are often recognized as fools or cranks. Until at least 1980 most people, even conservatives, thought that the Soviet Union was an Evil Empire with great powers of survival. It could repress anything. by economic measures of the West, the Soviet Union was generally recognized as a prosperous society even if the masses seemed not to prosper. 'Experts' were valuing Soviet output at prices for comparable objects in the West -- never mind that the Soviet Union was producing lots of stuff for which the rest of the world had a glut or that the Soviet economy was wasting energy (world energy use fell during the 1990s because Russia and the former Socialist states of Europe quite wasting energy as they did.

Is the mainstream always right? No. There just might be some quack cure for cancer, heart disease, AIDS, or arthritis that really works. I would not bet on it. If I am to ever buy a copper bracelet, then it will be strictly for appearance and not out of any expectation that it will give any relief from arthritis. So it is with economics. The purist libertarianism of Mises has consequences that most people find objectionable. Economic inequality that leads to mass deprivation offends too many sensibilities.

Do I have use for some of the teachings of libertarians? Sure. Hayek has a very good explanation of economic bubbles and how they cause economic meltdowns. Economic bubbles devour capital, pulling it away from investments that might do some real good and create a monstrous imbalance in the economy. Just think of the real estate boom of the Double-Zero decade. Without the bubble there might not have been so much wasteful development in housing that people could not afford. Americans would have been better off with more investment in industrial plant and equipment that creates jobs that make housing affordable, as the solid economy of the 1950s demonstrated. But with a bubble, capital is turned into garbage and only when people recognize that the investments are unworthy of the cost that a financial panic ensures.

But Hayek satisfies me on this without convincing me that pure plutocracy is the way to go.
(05-30-2017, 12:31 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]Mises was not mainstream.

It doesn't matter if he was mainstream.  It does matter that he was right and unless you have actually read the man's written work you really aren't in a position comment on it.  I would point out that the level of energy waste in the Soviet Union and the rest of the Warsaw Pact tends to underscore how bad central planning was and still is.

I would also remind you that Hayek got most of his ideas from Mises and he would never have approved of how big governments have gotten in the west.
Governments got big (1) to get out of the Great Depression and ensure that no repeat of it, (2) to meet the military needs of the Second World War, and (3) to resist the menace of Communism.

There is no valid rationale for bad Big Government.
Manuel Noriega. He can roast in Hell, so far as I am concerned.

the BBC Wrote:General Manuel Antonio Noriega, the former military leader of Panama, has died aged 83, officials have announced.

Noriega recently underwent an operation after suffering a haemorrhage following brain surgery.

Noriega had been a key US ally but was forcibly removed when American troops invaded in 1989 and was later jailed in the US on drugs and laundering charges.

He spent the rest of his life in custody, latterly in Panama for murder, corruption and embezzlement.

But the former leader was released into house arrest in January to prepare for an operation in early March to remove a brain tumour.


   Born in Panama City on 11 February 1934
   Studies at a military academy in Peru. Begins a three-decade relationship with the CIA
   Backs Gen Omar Torrijos in the coup that topples President Arnulfo Arias in 1968
   Rises in influence after mysterious plane-crash death of Gen Torrijos in 1981, becoming de facto ruler in 1983
   Plays key role in mid-1980s Iran-Contra affair, which involves smuggling weapons and drugs to aid US undercover efforts to support forces opposing the Sandinistas government in Nicaragua
   Ousted in 1989 after US invasion and jailed in US
   US trial reveals he wore red underwear to ward off the "evil eye"
   In Panama's El Renacer prison in 2014, unsuccessfully sues company behind the video game, Call of Duty: Black Ops II for using his image without permission

By 3 January 1990, Noriega surrendered and was flown to the US to face drug-trafficking, money-laundering and racketeering charges, serving 17 years in jail there.

While in prison he was convicted in absentia in France of money-laundering and sentenced to seven years. After the US extradited him to France, a court there approved a request from Panama in December 2010 to send him back home, where he was convicted again.

In an interview on Panamanian TV two years ago, Noriega read out a statement of apology.

He said: "I apologise to anyone who feels offended, affected, harmed or humiliated by my actions or those of my superiors whilst carrying out orders, or those of my subordinates, during the time of my civilian and military government."

A US Senate sub-committee once described Washington's relationship with Noriega as one of the United States' most serious foreign policy failures.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-40090143
Jiří Bělohlávek CBE (Czech pronunciation: [jɪr̝iː bjɛloɦlaːvɛk]; 24 February 1946 – 31 May 2017)[1] was a Czech conductor. He was a leading interpreter of Czech classical music, and became chief composer of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in 1990, a role he would serve on two different occasions during a combined span of seven years (1990-92, 2012-17). He also served a six-year tenure as the chief conductor of the BBC Symphony Orchestra from 2006-2012.[2] He gained international renown and repute for his performances of the works of Czech composers like Antonin Dvorak and Bohuslav Martinu, and was credited as "the most profound proponent of Czech orchestral music" by critics.[3]


Much more here


The management agency for Sir Jeffrey Tate has confirmed his death, this afternoon, at the age of 74. The eminent British conductor suffered a heart attack while visiting the Accademia Carrara in Bergamo, Italy, and could not be revived. Sir Jeffrey Tate, who was 74, was knighted six weeks ago for services to music.

Born with spina bifida and suffering disability all his life, he has been principal conductor at Covent Garden, the Rotterdam Philharmonic and the Sao Carlo theatre in Naples.

At the time of his death he was chief conductor of the Hamburg Symphony Orchestra.
His disability did not prevent him from working at most of the great opera houses, including the Met. At one point, in the 1980s, he was in line to become music director at Covent Garden. Amiable and sensitive, especially when rehearsing singers, Jeffrey was unfailingly well liked and respected.

- See more at: http://slippedisc.com/2017/06/sad-news-e...lak27.dpuf
Jack O'Neill (March 27, 1923[1] – June 2, 2017) was an American businessman, often credited with the invention of the wetsuit,[2] and the founder of the O'Neill brand.



In 1952, he founded the O'Neill brand while opening one of California's first surf shops in a garage on the Great Highway in San Francisco, close to his favorite bodysurfing break at the time.[2] This led to the establishment of a company that deals in wetsuits, surf gear, and clothing.[5] Jack O'Neill's name is attached to surfwear and his brand of surfing equipment.[6] Although O'Neill is widely believed to be the inventor of the wetsuit, an investigation concluded that UC Berkeley physicist Hugh Bradner was most likely the original inventor.[7]

In December 1996 he began a non-profit organization called O'Neill Sea Odyssey which provides students with hands-on lessons in marine biology and that teaches the relationship between the oceans and the environment.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_O%27N...sinessman)
What a cool dude he was. I'm sorry that he got old Smile But he was a long-lived guy who did good work.
Jimmy Piersall, 87, died Saturday in Wheaton, IL. He played for five different major league baseball teams, beginning with the Boston Red Sox during the 1950s. He was probably the first notable to come clean regarding the bipolar mental disorder which he suffered from. His battles with this condition were the inspiration for the autobiography and later movie titled "Fear Strikes Out". He was a very controversial player in his time, another not to resurface until Richie Allen in the late 1960s who mellowed considerably by the time he became Dick Allen during his days with the Chicago White Sox. And, speaking of the White Sox, Mr. Piersall again stirred up controversy as a commentator for that time when being paired with Harry Caray prior to the latter's tenure with the team on the other side of town. He was not afraid to call a spade a spade, something that wouldn't be tolerated for a minute in today's sports world. With that in mind I am enclosing a link which pretty much says it all.

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/06/05/n...all-death/
Adnan Khashoggi (Arabic: عدنان خاشقجي‎‎, Turkish: Adnan Kaşıkçı; 25 July 1935 – 6 June 2017) was a Saudi Arabian billionaire international businessman, best known for his involvement in arms dealing. He is estimated to have had a peak net worth of around US$4 billion in the early 1980s.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adnan_Khashoggi
My favorite Batman (Adam West):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_West

The case: he wasn't as full of himself as the later versions.
(06-11-2017, 11:49 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]My favorite Batman (Adam West):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_West

The case: he wasn't as full of himself as the later versions.

He was a Batman for a different era even so I rather enjoyed the over the top campiness of the show.  Hard to believe that he was offered the role of James Bond and then turned it down.
(06-11-2017, 11:21 PM)Galen Wrote: [ -> ]
(06-11-2017, 11:49 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: [ -> ]My favorite Batman (Adam West):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_West

The case: he wasn't as full of himself as the later versions.

He was a Batman for a different era even so I rather enjoyed the over the top campiness of the show.  Hard to believe that he was offered the role of James Bond and then turned it down.

Adam West played the role for camp, which is not how James Bond was intended to be. For that there was Casino Royale, one of the few bombs in the James Bond series. Woody Allen, which had to be a huge mistake in casting, was in that one James Bond disaster. Woody Allen can do camp, too.

But now that I think of it I can see some similarities between James Bond movies and the 'Sixties Batman. Both James Bond and Batman had their fancy cars and gadgets... and unrealistic villains. The crime did not have to make sense. Of course, the 'Sixties Batman was made for more of a child audience because it was on the air in early evening and the James Bond flicks had more allusions to sex.
Helmut Kohl, chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany as it became the government of all parts of Germany since 1945 in a peaceful merger of the German Federal Republic and the former German Democratic Republic (the latter actually becoming democratic in its last few months of existence):


Helmut Josef Michael Kohl (German: [ˈhɛlmuːt ˈjoːzɛf 'mɪçaʔeːl ˈkoːl]; 3 April 1930 – 16 June 2017) was a German statesman who served as Chancellor of Germany from 1982 to 1998 (of West Germany 1982–90 and of the reunited Germany 1990–98) and as the chairman of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) from 1973 to 1998. From 1969 to 1976, Kohl was Minister President of Rhineland-Palatinate.
Kohl's 16-year tenure was the longest of any German Chancellor since Otto von Bismarck. Kohl oversaw the end of the Cold War and is widely regarded as the mastermind of German reunification. Together with French President François Mitterrand, Kohl is considered to be the architect of the Maastricht Treaty, which established the European Union (EU) and the euro currency.[2] His life after the Chancellorship was overshadowed by a donations scandal and his estrangement from his former protégée Angela Merkel.
Kohl was described as "the greatest European leader of the second half of the 20th century" by U.S. Presidents George H. W. Bush[3] and Bill Clinton.[4] Kohl received the Charlemagne Prize in 1988 with François Mitterrand; in 1998 Kohl became the second person to be named Honorary Citizen of Europe by the European heads of state or government.

(Much more at the link associated with his name in Wikipedia)

Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit
Für das deutsche Vaterland!
Danach lasst uns alle streben
Brüderlich mit Herz und Hand!
Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit
Sind des Glückes Unterpfand;
 |: Blüh' im Glanze dieses Glückes,
  Blühe, deutsches Vaterland! :|
William Szathmary (October 5, 1924 – June 15, 2017), known professionally by his stage name Bill Dana, was an American comedian, actor, and screenwriter.[1] He often appeared on television shows such as The Ed Sullivan Show, frequently in the guise of a heavily accented Bolivian character named José Jiménez. Dana often portrayed the Jiménez character as an astronaut.

Dana was born as William Szathmary in Quincy, Massachusetts. He was of Hungarian-Jewish descent.[2] He took his stage name "Dana" after his mother's first name "Dena" as he felt "Szathmary" was unpronounceable.[3]

The youngest of six children born to Joseph and Dena Szathmary, Dana benefited from the expertise of an older brother, Arthur, who was fluent in several languages and gave his sibling his second entry into foreign languages. The first was growing up in a polyglot neighborhood where Spanish and Italian were among the languages spoken and having a Hungarian immigrant for a father. His older brother was Irving Szathmary, composer of the Get Smart theme.[4]

During World War II he served in the United States Army with the 263rd Infantry Regiment, 66th Infantry Division as a 60mm mortarman and machine gunner, as well as an unofficial interpreter.[4]


Dana began his career as a page at NBC's famous Studio 6B while performing comedy in nightclubs around New York with partner Gene Wood. In the 1950s, he performed on The Imogene Coca Show, The Danny Thomas Show and The Martha Raye Show, as well as writing for and producing The Spike Jones Show.[2]

Dana's career took a major turn when he began writing stand-up routines for the young comedian Don Adams, including the now well-known "Would you believe?" jokes popularized by Get Smart. From there, he was brought in as a writer for The Steve Allen Show, where he created the José Jiménez character for the show's "Man in the Street" segments.[2]

On an Ed Sullivan Show appearance, Dana related a story of how a woman recognized him on the street, but knew him only as José Jiménez, and asked what his real name was. Instead of his stage name, "Bill Dana", he gave her his real name, "William Szathmary". The woman rejoined: "Wow, no wonder you changed it to Jiménez!"[citation needed]

Dana had several comedy albums but only one that strictly featured the Jose Jimenez character. One of the cuts; "The Astronaut (Part 1 & 2)"...an interview from news reporter, writer and producer Don Hinkley...made it to the Billboard Top 40 charts at #19 in September 1961. Hinkley and Dana met as writers for the Allen show.

[Image: 180px-Bill_Dana_Danny_Thomas_1961.JPG]

Dana as José Jiménez on The Danny Thomas Show.

In 1961, Dana made the first of eight appearances on The Danny Thomas Show, playing Jimenez as a bumbling but endearing bellhop. The character was so well-received that it was spun off into his own NBC sitcom, The Bill Dana Show (1963–1965). Jiménez was still a bellhop, but now at a posh New York hotel. His snooty, irritable boss was played by Jonathan Harris. The cast also included Don Adams as a hopelessly inept house detective named Byron Glick; when the show was cancelled, Adams quickly used the Glick characterization as the basis for Maxwell Smart, and Get Smart premiered on NBC that fall.

Before appearing in front of a television camera for the first time on The Steve Allen Show in 1959, Dana had been a prolific comedy writer, an activity he continued into the 1980s, producing material for other actors on stage and screen. Dana co-wrote the script for the Get Smart theatrical film The Nude Bomb.[5] His brother, Irving Szathmary, wrote the famous theme for the Get Smart television series.[6]

[Image: 180px-Bill_Dana_Caterina_Valente_1965.jpg]

With Catarina Valente on The Hollywood Palace, 1965.

In 1966, Dana wrote the animated TV-movie Alice in Wonderland (or What’s a Nice Kid Like You Doing in a Place Like This?), in which he also supplied the voice of The White Knight (using his José Jiménez voice).[7] That same year, the Jiménez character was animated for the Paramount cartoon I Want My Mummy, written by Dana in collaboration with Howard Post.
In 1966, Dana appeared uncredited in episode 48 of Batman playing Jose Jimenez, opening the window in the wall Batman was climbing and talking with him.

 


In May 1967, Dana hosted his own late-night talk show, The Las Vegas Show, on the new United Network.[8] Originated live from the Hotel Hacienda in Las Vegas, Nevada, the program was cancelled by the end of May when the United Network folded.[9]
Joey Forman's 1968 parody album about Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, called The Mashuganishi Yogi ("mashugana" meaning crazy or bizarre in Yiddish), was produced by Dana, and includes a cameo of Dana as Jiménez, as well as a cover appearance. The album is a mock news conference, an extended question-and-answer session. The ersatz Bolivian–accented Jiménez asks the ersatz Indian-accented Yogi: "Why do you talk so funny?"

In 1970, responding to changing times and sensitivities, Dana stopped portraying the José Jiménez character; however, he played the character again on the 1988 revival of The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. Dana wrote the script for possibly the best known episode of the hit situation comedy All in the Family, entitled "Sammy's Visit", which featured Sammy Davis Jr.[10] In 1976, he appeared in the "A Doctor's Doctor" episode of the NBC situation comedy The Practice as the hospital roommate of Danny Thomas's character Dr. Jules Bedford.

The José Jiménez character was part of several scenes in the 1983 film The Right Stuff. The government officials watch The Ed Sullivan Show before recruiting the Navy pilots. Sullivan is talking to Jiménez. ("Is that your crash helmet?" "Oh, I hope not!") Later during medical testing, a large, Hispanic worker (played by NFL offensive tackle Anthony Muñoz) takes offense to Alan Shepard (Scott Glenn) mimicking the Jiménez character. The hospital worker gets a measure of revenge later on when it comes time for Shepard to receive an enema.
Although his film appearances were few, Dana had roles in a few movies including The Busy Body (1967), Harrad Summer (1974), I Wonder Who's Killing Her Now? (1975), and the aforementioned The Nude Bomb (1980). Dana would also have a recurring role on The Golden Girls as Sophia Petrillo's brother Angelo. He also played her father in a flashback. In addition, he played Wendell Balaban on Too Close for Comfort, as well as Howie Mandel's father on the series St. Elsewhere.[11]

Dana reprised the role of Bernardo the servant on the CBS TV series Zorro and Son, but his performance was different from Gene Sheldon's silence on the 1950s live-action show. Both series were produced by Walt Disney Productions.[12]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Dana
Did you forget Bill Dana? He was really, really good -- even if "José Jiménez" is now politically-incorrect.

I guess a male Hungarian accent isn't so funny. Of course there was Eva Gabor...
Another of the Greatest Generation:


Ola Mildred Rexroat (August 28, 1917 – June 28, 2017) was the only Native American woman to serve in the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP).[1][2]

She joined after high school and had the dangerous job of towing targets for aerial gunnery students.[3] After that she joined the Air Force, where she served for ten years as an air traffic controller.[2][3][4]

In 2007 she was inducted into the South Dakota Aviation Hall of Fame.[5]

She was an Oglala Sioux from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.[6] She earned a bachelor's degree in art from the University of New Mexico in 1939.[7][8]
 
Rexroat died in June 2017 at the age of 99.[9]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ola_Mildred_Rexroat
Any mathematicians reading this?

Maryam Mirzakhani (Persian: مریم میرزاخانی‎‎‎; 3 May 1977 – 14 July 2017) was an Iranian[7][1] mathematician and a professor of mathematics at Stanford University.[8][9][10] Her research topics include Teichmüller theory, hyperbolic geometry, ergodic theory, and symplectic geometry.[1]

On 13 August 2014, Mirzakhani became both the first woman and the first Iranian honored with the Fields Medal, the most prestigious award in mathematics.[11][12] The award committee cited her work in "the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces".[13]

.....



Mirzakhani made several contributions to the theory of moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces. In her early work, Mirzakhani discovered a formula expressing the volume of a moduli space with a given genus as a polynomial in the number of boundary components. This led her to obtain a new proof for the formula discovered by Edward Witten and Maxim Kontsevich on the intersection numbers of tautological classes on moduli space,[8] as well as an asymptotic formula for the growth of the number of simple closed geodesics on a compact hyperbolic surface, generalizing the theorem of the three geodesics for spherical surfaces.[20] Her subsequent work focused on Teichmüller dynamics of moduli space. In particular, she was able to prove the long-standing conjecture that William Thurston's earthquake flow on Teichmüller space is ergodic.[21]

Most recently as of 2014, with Alex Eskin and with input from Amir Mohammadi, Mirzakhani proved that complex geodesics and their closures in moduli space are surprisingly regular, rather than irregular or fractal.[22][23] The closures of complex geodesics are algebraic objects defined in terms of polynomials and therefore they have certain rigidity properties, which is analogous to a celebrated result that Marina Ratner arrived at during the 1990s.[23] The International Mathematical Union said in its press release that, "It is astounding to find that the rigidity in homogeneous spaces has an echo in the inhomogeneous world of moduli space."[23]

Mirzakhani was awarded the Fields Medal in 2014 for "her outstanding contributions to the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces".[24] The award was made in Seoul at the International Congress of Mathematicians on 13 August.[25]

At the time of the award, Jordan Ellenberg explained her research to a popular audience:

Quote:... [Her] work expertly blends dynamics with geometry. Among other things, she studies billiards. But now, in a move very characteristic of modern mathematics, it gets kind of meta: She considers not just one billiard table, but the universe of all possible billiard tables. And the kind of dynamics she studies doesn't directly concern the motion of the billiards on the table, but instead a transformation of the billiard table itself, which is changing its shape in a rule-governed way; if you like, the table itself moves like a strange planet around the universe of all possible tables ... This isn't the kind of thing you do to win at pool, but it's the kind of thing you do to win a Fields Medal. And it's what you need to do in order to expose the dynamics at the heart of geometry; for there's no question that they're there.[26]

In 2014, President Hassan Rouhani of Iran congratulated her for winning the topmost world mathematics prize.[27]
Mirzakhani has an Erdős number of 3.[28]

.................

Mirzakhani was married to Jan Vondrák, a Czech theoretical computer scientist and applied mathematician who is an associate professor at Stanford University;[29] their daughter is named Anahita.[30]
Mirzakhani described herself as a "slow" mathematician, saying that
Quote:You have to spend some energy and effort to see the beauty of math.
To solve problems, Mirzakhani would draw doodles on sheets of paper, and write mathematical formulas around the drawings. Her daughter described her mother's work as "painting".
Quote:I don’t have any particular recipe [for developing new proofs]... It is like being lost in a jungle and trying to use all the knowledge that you can gather to come up with some new tricks, and with some luck you might find a way out.
— Maryam Mirzakhani, [31]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryam_Mirzakhani
A great actor, Martin Landau:



Martin Landau /ˈlænˌdaʊ/ (June 20, 1928 – July 15, 2017) was an American film and television actor. His career began in the 1950s, with early film appearances including a supporting role in Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959). He played regular roles in the television series Mission: Impossible (for which he received several Emmy Award nominations and a Golden Globe Award) and Space: 1999.

Landau received the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture, as well as his first nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, for his role in Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988); he received his second Oscar nomination for his appearance in Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989). His performance in the supporting role of Bela Lugosi in Ed Wood (1994) earned him an Academy Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award and a Golden Globe Award. He continued to perform in film and TV, and headed the Hollywood branch of the Actors Studio until his death in 2017.

Landau was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 20, 1928, the son of Selma (née Buchman) and Morris Landau.[1] His family was Jewish; his father, an Austrian-born machinist, scrambled to rescue relatives from the Nazis.[2]
He attended James Madison High School and the Pratt Institute.[3] At the age of seventeen he found work at the New York Daily News, where he spent the next five years as an editorial cartoonist and worked alongside Gus Edson to produce the comic strip, The Gumps.[4][5][6] He quit the Daily News when he was 22 to concentrate on theater acting.

After auditioning for the Actors Studio in 1955, he and Steve McQueen were the only applicants admitted out of 500 that applied.[7] While there, he trained under Lee Strasberg, Elia Kazan and Harold Clurman, and eventually became an executive director with the Studio, along with Mark Rydell and Sydney Pollack.[4]

Influenced by Charlie Chaplin and the escapism of the cinema, Landau pursued an acting career.[8] He attended the Actors Studio, becoming good friends with James Dean. He recalled, "James Dean was my best friend. We were two young would-be and still-yet-to-work unemployed actors, dreaming out loud and enjoying every moment... We'd spend lots of time talking about the future, our craft and our chances of success in this newly different, ever-changing modern world we were living in."[9] He was also in the same class as Steve McQueen.[8]

In 1957, he made his Broadway debut in Middle of the Night. Landau made his first major film appearance in Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959) as Leonard, the right-hand man of a criminal played by James Mason.[10] He had featured roles in two 1960s epics, Cleopatra (1963) and The Greatest Story Ever Told, and played a ruthless killer in the western Nevada Smith (both 1965), which starred Steve McQueen.[8]

Landau played the role of master of disguise Rollin Hand in the US television series Mission: Impossible, becoming one of its better-known stars.[11] Landau at first declined to be contracted by the show because he did not want it to interfere with his film career; instead, he was credited for "special guest appearances" during the first season.[12] He became a full-time cast member in the second season, although the studio agreed (at Landau's request) to contract him only on a year-by-year basis rather than the then-standard five years.[13] The role of Hand required Landau to perform a wide range of accents and characters, from dictators to thugs, and several episodes had him playing dual roles—not only Hand's impersonation, but also the person whom Hand is impersonating.[14] Landau co-starred in the series with his then-wife Barbara Bain.[13]

In the mid-1970s, Landau and Bain returned to TV in the British science-fiction series Space: 1999 (first produced by Gerry Anderson in partnership with Sylvia Anderson, and later by Fred Freiberger).[15] Critical response to Space: 1999 was unenthusiastic during its original run, and it was cancelled after two seasons.[16] Landau himself was critical of the scripts and storylines, especially during the series' second season, but praised the cast and crew.[15] He later wrote forewords to Space: 1999 co-star Barry Morse's theatrical memoir Remember With Advantages (2006) and Jim Smith's critical biography of Tim Burton.[17] Following Space: 1999, Landau appeared in supporting roles in a number of films and TV series, including the TV film The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island (1981), which again co-starred Bain (and marked the final time they appeared together on screen).[18]


In the late 1980s, Landau made a career comeback, earning an Academy Award nomination for his role in Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988).[16] He said he was grateful to its director, Francis Ford Coppola, for the opportunity to play a role he enjoyed: "I've spent a lot of time playing roles that didn't really challenge me," he said, "You want roles that have dimension. The role of Abe Karatz gave me that."[4] He won the Golden Globe Award for his part in the film.[4]
This was followed by a second nomination, for Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989), in a role director Woody Allen had a hard time filling. Allen remembers:
Quote:I just couldn't find anybody good for the part of Judah... He read it, and he was completely natural. It's an interesting thing. Of all the actors I've ever worked with, he gives expression to my dialogue exactly as I hear it. His colloquialisms, his idiom, his inflection is exactly correct. So of all the people who've ever read my lines, he makes them correct every time... One of the reasons for this must be that Martin Landau came from my neighborhood in Brooklyn, right near where I lived, only a few blocks away.[19]

He won an Oscar for Ed Wood (1994), a biopic in which he plays actor Bela Lugosi. Landau researched the role of Lugosi by watching about 25 old Lugosi movies and studying the Hungarian accent, which contributed to Lugosi's decline in acting. "I began to respect this guy and pity him," said Landau. "I saw the humor in him. This, for me, became a love letter to him, because he never got a chance to get out of that. I got a chance to make a comeback in my career. And I'm giving him one. I'm giving him the last role he never got."[20]

Landau also received a Screen Actors Guild Award, a Golden Globe Award and a Saturn Award for the role, as well as accolades from a number of critics groups.[16] Gregory Walcott, who was in the film, watched the screening of it at the Motion Picture Academy and said that the Academy members "gave Landau a hearty, spontaneous applause over the end credits."[20]

Landau's film roles in the 1990s included a down-on-his-luck Hollywood producer in the comedy Mistress (1992) with Robert De Niro and as a judge in the dramas City Hall (1995) with Al Pacino and Rounders (1998) with Matt Damon.[14]

In the 1994 Spider-Man TV series, Martin Landau provided the voice of Scorpion for the first two seasons where the later seasons have the role recast to Richard Moll.

He played a supporting role in The Majestic (2001), starring Jim Carrey. The film received mostly negative reviews, although one reviewer wrote that "the lone outpost of authenticity is manned by Martin Landau, who gives a heartfelt performance," as an aging father who believes that his missing son has returned from World War II.[21]

In the early seasons of Without a Trace (2002–09), Landau was nominated for an Emmy Award for his portrayal of the Alzheimer's-afflicted father of FBI Special Agent in Charge Jack Malone, the series' lead character.[16] In 2006, he made a guest appearance in the series Entourage as a washed-up but determined and sympathetic Hollywood producer attempting to relive his glory days, a portrayal that earned him a second Emmy nomination.[16]
Landau appeared in the television film Have a Little Faith (2011) based on Mitch Albom's book of the same name, in which he plays Rabbi Albert Lewis.[22]

In recognition of his services to the motion picture industry, Martin Landau has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6841 Hollywood Boulevard.[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Landau


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