Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
the best songs ever
Forty-Second Street (1932)




https://youtu.be/S_SeoB8Jz_w

Artist
John Lesko
Writers
Harry Warren, Al Dubin
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best rock song ever:
The Who - Won't Get Fooled Again (1971)



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best organ work, and best music ever:

J.S. Bach - Toccata in F BWV 540, performed by Dan Campolieta



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best symphonic movement ever:

Mozart, Symphony 41, Allegro Molto, (1788) performed by Leonard Bernstein, NY Philharmonic



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best classical music ever:

Beethoven, Symphony #9 (1823) Chicago Symphony, Muti



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best new age/electronica work ever:

Klaus Schulze, Totem (1972)



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Best pop, big band or musical song ever:

Somewhere Over the Rainbow, by Judy Garland, Arlen/Harburg (1939)






http://philosopherswheel.com/faveslist.html
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
And one of the cleverest and wittiest settings of poetry as a literal song in classical music:






also suited to a female voice:





One of my favorite symphonic movements in which counterpoint that even Bach would have appreciated  and whose clever variations suggest Beethoven-- could anyone other than Mahler meld the two? depends on the trick of showing that completing the phrase is anticlimax. Gustav Mahler, Rondo-Burleske, final movement of his fifth symphony:



The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Arguably the greatest symphonic slow movement ever, the adagio of the seventh symphony of Anton Bruckner. This recording is by the Berlin Philharmonic in 1942 -- yes, from the sickest cesspool of gangster rule in inhuman history, Nazi Germany. Evil people can love great music, too -- just a warning.






This was the official mourning music for the Demons' Reich, playing on the radio after such events as the final surrender of German forces at Stalingrad, the formal surrender of the Third Reich to the Allies, and above all the death of Adolf Hitler. In a way this piece of music (and this may be the recording) might be more for celebration. It's old, so the brasses may not have full power, but the strings and winds are exactly what one would expect of the Berlin Philharmonic in better times for Germany.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
The greatest work ever for solo harpsichord:






Some deride the style is excessively mechanical -- Bach being played on a sewing machine, as I have seen it described. But is pure music for JS Bach's conception, completely unsuited for Romantic rumination.

-----------------

It can also come off well on a solo piano.  Glenn Gould  gets harpsichord-like textures out of a piano.  Bach seemed to not like the pianofortes to which he was introduced (tuning problems? The temptation to play music in ways that Bach didn't like his works played? OK, Liszt's sonata for piano would not come off well on a harpsichord.

Old JSB would have probably liked Gould's 1955 performance for not adding affections that Bach never intended.






Oh, do I now regret not getting to learn how to play a keyboard instrument as a child!
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
I like the string trio version, especially this performance of the final variation by Matt Haimovitz, Jonathan Crow & Douglas Mcnabney, #30 (track 31). This version was arranged by Dmitry Sitkovetsky, and has been performed by many string trios.





Complete version playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVgKu3QP...S7ssj_nW0I
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(05-22-2019, 04:18 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: I like the string trio version, especially this performance of the final variation by Matt Haimovitz, Jonathan Crow & Douglas Mcnabney, #30 (track 31). This version was arranged by Dmitry Sitkovetsky, and has been performed by many string trios.





Complete version playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVgKu3QP...S7ssj_nW0I

I have heard that delightful and not-so-obvious arrangement. Then there is the glorious Art of Fugue, probably the longest non-choral, non-operatic work other than some ballets, Mahler symphonies, and Beethoven's Diabelli Variations that I can listen to in one sitting (allowance for bathroom breaks may be necessary).
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
There is a near-excess of string quartets from which to choose for the greatest (Haydn to Shostakovich by way of Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Smetana, Brahms, Dvorak, Debussy, Ives, Ravel, Schoenberg, Prokofiev, and Bartok), but not so with works for string trio. Mozart modestly calls this work , the trio in E-flat major (K 563) with an uncanny modesty a divertimento, literally an 'entertainment'. For an 'entertainment' it offers a depth of feeling that I would not expect of something light-hearted.

Few composers ever write even one such work, and it is remarkable that Mozart could write this one.... and call it an 'entertainment'.






Some "entertainment"! A bit deep for such a description, but well worth the listen.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
Not claiming this video is correct, but it might fill some holes we still have from before the 1920s.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
We've been dipping into classical music at the end of this thread, which generally has moved backwards in time, but now it's in no particular temporal order. So I guess I can stick in this video of myself playing one of my favorite Baroque fugues for organ. This will be the oldest best "song" ever posted here so far. I recorded this on my phone, but not with live video; I just put some pictures up as the music goes along.

This Fugue in F is the perfect baroque fugue; concise and bouyant like the spirit of the age. Dietrich Buxtehude was J.S. Bach's hero; he vacated his early job as an organist at Arnstadt to walk to Hamburg in order to hear him play and study with him in his last days. I have practiced this piece a lot and finally felt confident enough to record it on my own home organ with my new android phone. I also wanted to record it because there are few if any versions of it on you tube that bring out its full beauty. So actually I think I have the best version now on you tube, but it does not include the preceding Toccata (which is actually easier to play)



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
An apocalyptic, Fourth Turning Crisis Era love song:



Reply
Just to remind us all -- Dame Vera Lynn, who made endearing renditions of "We'll Meet Again" for adults and the lullaby for scared children, "The White Cliffs of Dover" that gave hope and humanity to people during the Blitz, has passed away at the age 103.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
(06-13-2020, 07:37 AM)John J. Xenakis Wrote: An apocalyptic, Fourth Turning Crisis Era love song:




Trying to get the connection here, especially since this song's heyday was smack dab in the middle of a 2T.
Reply
(06-19-2020, 04:56 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Just to remind us all -- Dame Vera Lynn, who made endearing renditions of "We'll Meet Again" for adults and the lullaby for scared children, "The White Cliffs of Dover" that gave hope and humanity to people during the Blitz, has passed away at the age 103.

Certainly memorable for those of us who enjoyed Dr. Strangelove (1964).



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  the best songs ever: the lost years gabrielle 490 149,255 07-10-2020, 12:00 AM
Last Post: Eric the Green
  The best 4T songs MillsT_98 82 29,635 05-16-2020, 11:15 PM
Last Post: Eric the Green

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)