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Trump Trainwreck - Ongoing diary of betrayal and evil
#41
(11-15-2016, 01:44 PM)playwrite Wrote:
(11-14-2016, 09:33 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-14-2016, 08:54 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote:
(11-14-2016, 07:47 PM)Eric the Green Wrote:
(11-14-2016, 03:10 PM)X_4AD_84 Wrote: Bolton is probably too "normal" to fit in with the Alt-Right cabal. I'm expecting worse.

There is no worse.

No Eric, there are far worse. For example, Alt-Right operatives. If someone like that got in, you'd be craving someone like Bolton.

Eric and other Lefties - you really, really, really need to start understanding the actual composition of the Right and the faux "Right." Lumping it all together will only result in your ongoing deep confusion.

Absolutely correct. Stereotypes are dividing people as it is easier to stereotype than to understand.

Gag me with a spoon.

Did your grandmother write letters to Auschwitz prisoners in the 1940s telling them to just play nice and maybe the guards won't gas them?

Must be so nice to live in Oz.

NZ and OZ, pretty close.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#42
I just so love the title of this thread.
There was never any good old days
They are today, they are tomorrow
It's a stupid thing we say
Cursing tomorrow with sorrow
       -- Eugene Hutz
Reply
#43
TRUMP VOTERS WANTED "CHANGE." IS THIS THE "CHANGE" THEY WANTED? CLIMATE CHANGE?

Trump’s denial of catastrophic climate change is a clear danger


[Image: Melting_Sea_Ice-c631d-1887.jpg?uuid=srVl...ehAw-CL8NQ]
Ice floats in the Arctic near Svalbard, Norway, in 2009. (Dirk Notz/Associated Press)

By Katrina vanden Heuvel November 15
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/...ff91790723

Donald Trump’s stunning victory has left millions in dread and moved thousands into the streets. Fear has spread among immigrants and Muslims. The 20 million who have received health insurance under Obamacare worry about Trump’s vow to repeal it. The media speculates about what he might do: Will he really tear up the Iran nuclear deal or order the CIA to start torturing people again? But it is Trump’s denial of catastrophic climate change — he has repeatedly said he considers it a “hoax” — and his vow to reverse all of the progress made under President Obama to address it that pose some of the most chilling and potentially irreversible threats.

Voters heard little about climate change in the endless election campaign. The contrast between the two candidates was night and day, with Hillary Clinton promising to expand on Obama’s climate initiatives and Trump vowing to repeal them. Yet not one question was posed about climate change in the presidential debates. The media gave more airtime to the size of Trump’s hands than to the scope of his climate delusion.

Yet the stakes are huge. Climate change isn’t a distant concern; it is a clear and present danger. Mr. Trump may not believe that, but the generals in the Pentagon have no doubts. A Pentagon report says that climate change is an “urgent and growing threat to our national security.” In January, Pentagon officials were instructed to include climate change in every decision, from readying troops for battle to testing weapons.

As environmentalist Bill McKibben pointed out last week, climate change is already here. The world’s global warming — and the melting of the Arctic ice caps — are now occurring at a much faster rate than scientists previously predicted. Most of the summer sea ice in the Arctic has melted. That’s enough heat, McKibben reports, that record-warm water swept across the Pacific this spring, killing “vast swaths of coral.” That’s enough heat to already cause steady increases in droughts and shocking downpours and floods in wet areas. It has already begun to raise the levels of the ocean. Scientists now suggest that, even with the Paris climate talks, we are on a trajectory to increase the Earth’s temperature 3.5 degrees Celsius or more. If we do that, many cities around the world will be underwater.

Under Obama, the United States played a leading role in getting China — and eventually India — to join the 2015 Paris agreement, with countries pledging carbon reduction commitments needed to keep the world from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius. Many scientists believe that goal is not enough, but meeting even that level will require dramatic and immediate action. One-hundred-and-nine countries responsible for nearly eighty percent of greenhouse-gas emissions have now ratified the agreement, enacting it into international law. The United States represents about 20 percent of the pledged reductions of world greenhouse-gas emissions. Much of this will come from Obama’s Clean Power Plan, designed to enforce Environmental Protection Agency standards on carbon emissions, calling on the states to reduce power plant emissions by 32 percent by 2030.

In the campaign, Trump announced that he would seek to repeal the Clean Power Plan and withdraw from the Paris agreement. He has also pledged to go forward with the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, to slash investment in climate research and development in renewable energy and efficiency innovation, to open up leasing of oil, gas and coal on federal lands onshore and offshore and to revive coal. He has named Myron Ebell, a notorious climate-change denier and head of a think tank funded in part by the coal industry, to head his EPA and energy transition team. Conservative Republicans who dominate the majority in Congress have railed against Obama’s plans. Oil and coal barons — think the Koch Brothers, among the richest people in the world — wield big money and deep pockets on the Republican right.

There are limits on what Trump can do. The stock price of bankrupt Peabody Energy coal company rose upon Trump’s election, but coal is virtually dead, unable to compete in price with natural gas, production of which Trump plans to expand. More dangerous are reports that he’ll move to loosen regulation of gas pipelines. Methane leaks from pipelines are a far more potent contributor to global warming than even carbon emissions.

Elections do have consequences — often ones not intended by voters. Americans elected George W. Bush, who called for a more modest U.S. role in the world and got the president who drove the disastrous invasion of Iraq. A minority of Americans voted for Trump, largely because they wanted change — but few had any idea of the calamitous consequences that will follow if he carries through his know- nothing stance on climate change.

Trump’s efforts will be and must be resisted. 2014 saw the People’s Climate March — billed as the largest demonstration on climate ever in New York City. Another protest is being planned for Washington next spring. Civil disobedience helped stall the building of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, and those protests will surely ramp up. The divestment campaign has removed trillions from oil industry investments and will continue to spread. Other countries will invest in renewable energy and efficiency innovations, winning global markets and jobs that the United States will forfeit. In this country, California and New York and other states will continue to push toward renewable energy and require higher efficiency and mileage stands, forcing manufacturers to respond. Democrats in the Senate and House will fight a long, rearguard action to limit the damage.

But time is not on our side, or on the side of civilization. McKibben noted that the real contest isn’t between Democrats and Republicans or Clinton and Trump, but between “human beings and physics,” and physics “is not prone to compromise.” If we don’t move quickly, very quickly, then any progress will be too late. We can’t afford to drift for four or eight years; we can’t afford to stall what little momentum has been created. Trump may think that it will be easy to reverse Obama’s climate measures. He is about to find out that millions of concerned citizens here and abroad will use every nonviolent means possible to stop him from accelerating the worst crisis humans have ever faced. That isn’t about politics; it is about survival.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#44
[Image: 15056396_1294832167236115_61067760565277...e=58CEE520]

Republicans also got control of all three in 1952, for 2 years, but the margins were narrow.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#45
(11-17-2016, 04:14 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: [Image: 15056396_1294832167236115_61067760565277...e=58CEE520]

You really do have a problem with causality.  Try taking a look some economic statistics and you would realize the US has been or will be in a recession soon.  This will happen no matter who is President because this so called recovery has been going on for about seven years now and the average length of an economic expansion since 1854 has been about four years.  Take a look at a normal curve and do the math.
Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard. -- H.L. Mencken

If one rejects laissez faire on account of man's fallibility and moral weakness, one must for the same reason also reject every kind of government action.   -- Ludwig von Mises
Reply
#46
(11-17-2016, 04:14 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: [Image: 15056396_1294832167236115_61067760565277...e=58CEE520]

Republicans also got control of all three in 1952, for 2 years, but the margins were narrow.

In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#47
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!

Snooty is likely enough.

I have a number of hobbies and interests other than visiting this forum. I get out a few times a week for fantasy role playing games. The computer I'm typing this on also drives a MIDI studio, with a keyboard, synth and mixer attached. My other internet forum is Patriots Planet, dedicated to the NFL football team. I still own the martial arts studio where I once studied, the building at least. It's use as a studio is essentially forgotten.

Taking pride in one's interests is fine. Scorning someone else's interests, less so. Scorning the person because of that interest? It is typical for a follower of classical music to have a low opinion of country and western, but is that an excuse to scorn the person as opposed to the music? My sisters are both into quilting, which isn't my thing, but I'm not going to imply in any way that that isn't a fine thing. (My bed is covered with a quilt made up from the T-shirts I wore in my early adulthood, for example. Warm memories.) Does it in any way diminish a man to follow the Sooners rather than the magnificent Patriots?

It's been said that part of the Trump backlash is urban folk laughing at and dismissing the rural folk as inferior in so many ways. Well, many live in a simpler environment. Simpler values and perspectives might still work fine there, while the faster pace and complexity of urban live makes for a different sort of person. It might be hard not to judge. It might be prudent not to rub in one's less favorable judgments.
Reply
#48
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 04:14 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: [Image: 15056396_1294832167236115_61067760565277...e=58CEE520]

Republicans also got control of all three in 1952, for 2 years, but the margins were narrow.

In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!
How does a one way thinker like yourself make the mistake of believing and portraying himself as intellectually sophisticated? How does that happen?
Reply
#49
(11-17-2016, 11:18 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!

Snooty is likely enough.

I have a number of hobbies and interests other than visiting this forum.  I get out a few times a week for fantasy role playing games.  The computer I'm typing this on also drives a MIDI studio, with a keyboard, synth and mixer attached.  My other internet forum is Patriots Planet, dedicated to the NFL football team.  I still own the martial arts studio where I once studied, the building at least.  It's use as a studio is essentially forgotten.

Taking pride in one's interests is fine.  Scorning someone else's interests, less so.  Scorning the person because of that interest?  It is typical for a follower of classical music to have a low opinion of country and western, but is that an excuse to scorn the person as opposed to the music?  My sisters are both into quilting, which isn't my thing, but I'm not going to imply in any way that that isn't a fine thing.  (My bed is covered with a quilt made up from the T-shirts I wore in my early adulthood, for example.  Warm memories.)  Does it in any way diminish a man to follow the Sooners rather than the magnificent Patriots?

It's been said that part of the Trump backlash is urban folk laughing at and dismissing the rural folk as inferior in so many ways.  Well, many live in a simpler environment.  Simpler values and perspectives might still work fine there, while the faster pace and complexity of urban live makes for a different sort of person.  It might be hard not to judge.  It might be prudent not to rub in one's less favorable judgments.
Well said
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#50
(11-17-2016, 02:23 PM)Classic-Xer Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 04:14 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: [Image: 15056396_1294832167236115_61067760565277...e=58CEE520]

Republicans also got control of all three in 1952, for 2 years, but the margins were narrow.

In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!
How does a one way thinker like yourself make the mistake of believing and portraying himself as intellectually sophisticated? How does that happen?

How would you know? As a thinker, you don't look very far beyond the ideology of resentment about your taxes going for freebies for the lazy. Trickle-down economics is not very sophisticated.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#51
(11-17-2016, 02:29 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 11:18 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!

Snooty is likely enough.

I have a number of hobbies and interests other than visiting this forum.  I get out a few times a week for fantasy role playing games.  The computer I'm typing this on also drives a MIDI studio, with a keyboard, synth and mixer attached.  My other internet forum is Patriots Planet, dedicated to the NFL football team.  I still own the martial arts studio where I once studied, the building at least.  It's use as a studio is essentially forgotten.

Taking pride in one's interests is fine.  Scorning someone else's interests, less so.  Scorning the person because of that interest?  It is typical for a follower of classical music to have a low opinion of country and western, but is that an excuse to scorn the person as opposed to the music?  My sisters are both into quilting, which isn't my thing, but I'm not going to imply in any way that that isn't a fine thing.  (My bed is covered with a quilt made up from the T-shirts I wore in my early adulthood, for example.  Warm memories.)  Does it in any way diminish a man to follow the Sooners rather than the magnificent Patriots?

It's been said that part of the Trump backlash is urban folk laughing at and dismissing the rural folk as inferior in so many ways.  Well, many live in a simpler environment.  Simpler values and perspectives might still work fine there, while the faster pace and complexity of urban live makes for a different sort of person.  It might be hard not to judge.  It might be prudent not to rub in one's less favorable judgments.
Well said

I do not laugh at such people. It may be that one does not need so much sophistication to live in rural America. Small-town life entails a complexity of human relationships that in urban environments are far less personal. One may need some more sophisticated life to put up with urbam reality -- a reason to put up  with the high costs of living, stress of commuting and using mass transit. Rural America is very different from any big city, and living in Chicago is more like living in New York City than in rural areas fifty miles away.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#52
(11-17-2016, 04:10 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 02:29 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 11:18 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 10:06 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: In 1952 they were rational enough to recognize that the common man had to have a stake in the system. One side of the Red Scare was the need for a consumer society in which such people as assembly-line workers had a stake in the system so that they would not fall for the great menace of the day to capitalism -- Communism. In the 1950s the Communists were largely people who had few connections to the proletariat -- like creative people and academics.

Donald Trump and other right-wingers may pretend to show love for the working class by praising vulgarity and under-education... but that is a con. I'm tempted to believe that many working-class people would find life richer if they turned off the idiot screen and the more witless part of the Internet and instead sampled some great literature and sophisticated music. Such can give some meaning in life even if it does not improve one;s vocational opportunities. It has kept me from suicide on occasions. 

The short times in which I did factory work made me more crave intellectual sophistication. Maybe that makes me a poor match for factory work because certain jobs are made for certain cultures. I have never driven a truck, but you can just imagine what I would listen to on the radio to avoid falling asleep while driving through northern Illinois, Indiana, or Ohio  ... something like this:





Could I convince my fellow truck drivers to listen to this? Probably not! Would I have credibility as a truck driver with other truck drivers? They would probably think me insane, if not snooty!

Snooty is likely enough.

I have a number of hobbies and interests other than visiting this forum.  I get out a few times a week for fantasy role playing games.  The computer I'm typing this on also drives a MIDI studio, with a keyboard, synth and mixer attached.  My other internet forum is Patriots Planet, dedicated to the NFL football team.  I still own the martial arts studio where I once studied, the building at least.  It's use as a studio is essentially forgotten.

Taking pride in one's interests is fine.  Scorning someone else's interests, less so.  Scorning the person because of that interest?  It is typical for a follower of classical music to have a low opinion of country and western, but is that an excuse to scorn the person as opposed to the music?  My sisters are both into quilting, which isn't my thing, but I'm not going to imply in any way that that isn't a fine thing.  (My bed is covered with a quilt made up from the T-shirts I wore in my early adulthood, for example.  Warm memories.)  Does it in any way diminish a man to follow the Sooners rather than the magnificent Patriots?

It's been said that part of the Trump backlash is urban folk laughing at and dismissing the rural folk as inferior in so many ways.  Well, many live in a simpler environment.  Simpler values and perspectives might still work fine there, while the faster pace and complexity of urban live makes for a different sort of person.  It might be hard not to judge.  It might be prudent not to rub in one's less favorable judgments.
Well said

I do not laugh at such people. It may be that one does not need so much sophistication to live in rural America. Small-town life entails a complexity of human relationships that in urban environments are far less personal. One may need some more sophisticated life to put up with urbam reality -- a reason to put up  with the high costs of living, stress of commuting and using mass transit. Rural America is very different from any big city, and living in Chicago is more like living in New York City than in rural areas fifty miles away.

No but you have a quite pronounced superiority complex that does not reflect on why people enjoy what they enjoy and do what they do but rather judges from afar and places oneself above said people. I have seen this time and time again in your posts. Bob just said it in a far more polite way which I could learn from.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#53
That could be Asperger's.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#54
(11-17-2016, 04:18 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: That could be Asperger's.

Could be, yes. I do not know that much about it tbh.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
#55
With a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound
Trump shits on Clinton's busted ground
Helpless demos on a campaign stop
Scream bug-eyed as he looks in on top
He puckers Podesta and he throws him back down
As he pisses on special snowflakes' gowns
Oh no, they say he's got to go go go Trumpzilla
Oh no, there goes status quo go go Trumpzilla
Cool Big Grin Tongue



---Value Added Cool
Reply
#56
There is a terrible orange menace coming over the horizon, a threat to all our livelihoods and fortunes. A threat to our health, well-being and sanity. Trumpzilla is his name. Trumpzilla is coming; prepare and fight!

[Image: trump-zilla.jpg]
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
#57
(11-17-2016, 05:55 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: There is a terrible orange menace coming over the horizon, a threat to all our livelihoods and fortunes. A threat to our health, well-being and sanity. Trumpzilla is his name. Trumpzilla is coming; prepare and fight!

[Image: trump-zilla.jpg]

Obama Wrote:In an age of social media where so many people are getting their information in sound bites and snippets off their phones, if we can't discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems," he said. "If people, whether they're conservative, liberal, left or right, are unwilling to compromise and engage in the democratic process and are taking absolutist views and demonizing opponents, then democracy will break down.

I wonder if this is what Obama meant by 'demonizing'?
Reply
#58
(11-18-2016, 05:34 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 05:55 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: There is a terrible orange menace coming over the horizon, a threat to all our livelihoods and fortunes. A threat to our health, well-being and sanity. Trumpzilla is his name. Trumpzilla is coming; prepare and fight!

[Image: trump-zilla.jpg]

Obama Wrote:In an age of social media where so many people are getting their information in sound bites and snippets off their phones, if we can't discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems," he said. "If people, whether they're conservative, liberal, left or right, are unwilling to compromise and engage in the democratic process and are taking absolutist views and demonizing opponents, then democracy will break down.

I wonder if this is what Obama meant by 'demonizing'?

Welcome to the Weimar Republic circa 1930, where political life was rapidly polarizing between nationalists and socialists.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


Reply
#59
(11-18-2016, 05:34 AM)Bob Butler 54 Wrote:
(11-17-2016, 05:55 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: There is a terrible orange menace coming over the horizon, a threat to all our livelihoods and fortunes. A threat to our health, well-being and sanity. Trumpzilla is his name. Trumpzilla is coming; prepare and fight!

[Image: trump-zilla.jpg]

Obama Wrote:In an age of social media where so many people are getting their information in sound bites and snippets off their phones, if we can't discriminate between serious arguments and propaganda, then we have problems," he said. "If people, whether they're conservative, liberal, left or right, are unwilling to compromise and engage in the democratic process and are taking absolutist views and demonizing opponents, then democracy will break down.

I wonder if this is what Obama meant by 'demonizing'?

Maybe it's just pointing out what Trump IS.

His war on the environment alone makes him a monster. Do you want him to wipe out all the bees? Atty. Gen Sessions, you really think that's not demonic?

Are you aware, that "Trumpzilla" is the name that Trump supporters chose for him?
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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#60
If there is one thing that I can count on Donald Trump to do, it is the one promise that he has made that he has every desire to perform -- stick it to everybody that he can as he gets a chance (except to his fellow plutocrats). At one point or another everyone is going to feel like a loser. Some will feel like losers earlier than others -- especially any identifiable minority. But don't worry. One group after another will get hurt. At some time he will stick it to the handicapped. At another time he will stick it to farmers. At another time he will stick it to Catholics.

So if you are a Catholic farmer with an amputated leg, you will be hit three times. Sticking it to people is par for a sociopath.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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