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the best songs ever
(07-26-2016, 04:23 AM)Galen Wrote: Its a Prophet thing.  They have received the Word of God and so the rest of us must conform.

You don't seem to conform too well, "Galen." The Word has eluded ya.

Quote:  They always were nasty little tyrants.  Eric the Obtuse is not nearly as enlightened as he thinks.  Can't really distinguish facts from subjective taste.

Generalizations are approximate. But I think a lot of boomers were nasty little tyrants as kids. I grew up with them. They mellowed out considerably during the Awakening/2T and became love children. That was my experience. Then the 3T began, and right on the cue of the turning clock, us boomers went back to being tyrants again. Strange the way that happened. Makes me a believer in Strauss and Howe, "that I can tell you!" No, I am not as enlightened as I think. Or, whenever I think, I am less enlightened. Take your pick. But it's easy to be smarter than a doctrinaire libertarian like Mr. Galen, so no problem with me there lol

Quote:The seventies to me always had a surreal quality to it even if though I didn't use any of the common recreational pharmaceuticals.  It was a decade I would just as soon done without.

We can say we could do without a decade, but in the end, time is all the same now. It's just time flowing by and staying the same too. There were good things, and things we didn't like, but maybe learned from, in all times. Even the shoddy and ridiculous 00s had some good things. But we are who we are now, because of where we traveled to get here.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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I have a song for '66. Here it is.



1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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Yes I liked that one. It's a runner up on my 400 list. Here's the B side of the Supremes' "Itching in My Heart," perhaps their best B side.





The 4 Tops had a big hit "Reach Out I'll Be There." 1966-- a rich year for Motown and R&B.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Lots of critics cite "Good Vibrations" later in 1966 as the best song ever, and a breakthrough by Brian and the Boys into the psychedelic instrumental innovation, and the creativity of his Smile album. I like it too, but I don't pick it as best song ever. But because the critics cite it, I have to mention the Beach Boys and their breakthrough in 1966.

Lots of genre mixing in '66. The Beach Boys did a folk song early that year. So, folk rock surf music. This is the one I liked.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sloop_John_B
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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This is the song from 1966 I mentioned that I liked by Warren Zevon of Werewolves of London fame. On this song, he's known as Lyme and teams up with Cybelle, for "Follow Me." You can hear the same smooth rhythmic repetition in this song that enlivens the later one. This song was a long lost oldie until the Nuggets collections came out. Another folk rock proto-psychedelic classic from early 1966.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Here's a rare psych-pop nugget from the flower-power year of 1967, "Smell of Incense" by the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, active 1966-1970.




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smell_of_Incense
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_West_C...ental_Band

Another lesser-known west-coast psychedelic group was The United States of America
https://youtu.be/C0cuX0WSdhg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_United...ica_(band)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Another classic of the psychedelic revolution of 1966 was East West by the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. This is also a blues-jazz fusion work.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East-West_...and_album)

Mike Bloomfield (listed as composer of this track with Mark Naftalin) and Elvin Bishop were in this band.

The Work Song was also really cool, and was also released in 1966 by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass.

AllMusic Review by Mark Deming [-]
The raw immediacy and tight instrumental attack of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band's self-titled debut album were startling and impressive in 1965, but the following year, the group significantly upped the ante with its second LP, East-West. The debut showed that Butterfield and his bandmates could cut tough, authentic blues (not a given for an integrated band during the era in which fans were still debating if a white boy could play the blues) with the energy of rock & roll, but East-West was a far more ambitious set, with the band showing an effective command of jazz, Indian raga, and garagey proto-psychedelia as well as razor-sharp electric blues. Butterfield was the frontman, and his harp work was fierce and potent, but the core of the band was the dueling guitar work of Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop, especially Bloomfield's ferocious, acrobatic solos, while Mark Naftalin's keyboards added welcome washes of melodic color, and the rhythm section of bassist Jerome Arnold and drummer Billy Davenport were capable of both the rock-solid support of veteran blues players and the more flexible and artful pulse of a jazz combo, rising and relaxing with the dynamics of a performance. The Butterfield Blues Band sounded muscular and exciting on classic blues workouts like "Walkin' Blues," "Two Trains Running," and "I Got a Mind to Give Up Living," but the highlights came when the band pushed into new territory, such as the taut New Orleans proto-funk of "Get Out of My Life, Woman," the buzzy and mildly trippy "Mary, Mary," and especially two lengthy instrumental workouts, the free-flowing jazz of Nat Adderley's "Work Song" and the title track, a fiery mix of blues, psychedelia, Indian musical patterns, and several other stops in between, with Butterfield, Bloomfield, and Bishop blowing for all their worth. East-West would prove to be a pivotal album in the new blues-rock movement, and it was the Paul Butterfield Blues Band's greatest achievement; Bloomfield would be gone by the time they cut their next LP to form the Electric Flag, and as good as Bishop was, losing the thrust and parry between the two guitarists was a major blow. But East-West captures a great group in high flight as the bandmembers join together in something even more remarkable than their estimable skills as individuals would suggest, and its importance as a nexus point between rock, blues, jazz, and world music cannot be overestimated.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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The Mamas and the Papas!





A towering masterpiece of vocal and instrumental melody, counterpoint and arrangement. Originally Monday Monday was my #1 favorite and pick for all of 1966, but now I have it at all time #24, superceded by the best landmark innovations that came in the following months.

More well-known today because the lyrics apply to so many things, the previous hit California Dreamin' caught my attention immediately as something special too, and before long most everyone agreed that the Mamas and Papas were great indeed, although this song was not a #1 favorite of mine. But both are great landmarks of folk-rock and neo-classical and baroque music.
https://youtu.be/2xN9r0bWe78
The unfortunate mid-60s practice of splitting audio tracks meant that sometimes one of them is reduced in volume, and I couldn't find a video of this one where the sound is balanced.

Another 1966 hit, I Saw Her Again
https://youtu.be/HpKyZGH3sBQ

Mama Cass wails:
https://youtu.be/X_WlLYBfL-k (Beatle song)
http://www.2kmusic.com/en/webvideo/thema...ds-of-love

This follow-up was beautiful too:
Look Through My Window
https://youtu.be/pFpBk0Apt4M
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Bob Dylan

yeah, he did some of the best songs ever. Agree?

Here's a couple I liked from Spring 1966:





Everybody must get stoned! Then they'll come back again. Maybe anyone who posts here should listen to this one first! Hillary, I wouldn't feel so all alone.





I Want You. Versatile and universal, Bob Dylan wrote some great love songs like this one.

As Summer arrived, Bob had an accident that put him out of action for a while. His greatest period was over.

But he has continued to write songs and perform like a trooper. I just posted one of his later songs in the lost years thread. Something like "I Want You" in fact.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan
http://bobdylan.com/
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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(07-26-2016, 06:50 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: Bob Dylan

yeah, he did some of the best songs ever. Agree?

Here's a couple I liked from Spring 1966:





Everybody must get stoned! Then they'll come back again. Maybe anyone who posts here should listen to this one first! Hillary, I wouldn't feel so all alone.





I Want You. Versatile and universal, Bob Dylan wrote some great love songs like this one.

As Summer arrived, Bob had an accident that put him out of action for a while. His greatest period was over.

But he has continued to write songs and perform like a trooper. I just posted one of his later songs in the lost years thread. Something like "I Want You" in fact.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Dylan
http://bobdylan.com/

Could not name one of his songs. Your first video did not work and i do not like the 2nd one. His voice and style. Not my thing. But hey i listened to it.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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[Image: ac9f37154c915e098f824d924327005d.jpg]

Love Dylan!  There was a movie released a few years ago "inspired by the life and works of Bob Dylan" called I'm Not There, has anyone else seen it?  It was a rather strange (much like Dylan himself), but very beautifully made, with great music and a great cast.  The writer/director was a 1961 Gen Joneser.  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0368794/





The Beatles, Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones were my jams when I was 16-ish, after I got bored with top 40.  I loved 60s music--then I realized that my own generation was making music just as creative and exiting, in its own ways.  Eric disagrees, of course, but I do recall him admitting once on the old forum that his astrological studies indicated that there were creative influences at work during the late 80s and early 90s...
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Yes, I've admitted that already on the NEW forum too. Those creative influences indicated in "the stars" in that late 80s and early 90s period didn't quite reach the realm of rock n roll, in my opinion, since grunge was about it, and maybe rap (the other 3T styles I don't like were invented at the end of the 2T, and you could say that Muhammed Ali invented rap), but if you hear something in grunge that you like, that's fulfills the indication for you. I never could credit it; grunge is not musical to me. I thought in this period there was some transcendental and inspirational elements in electronica and new age music, and there was a psychedelic revival, and movements like cyberpunk. The roots for that music go back to the 2T too, but it developed in new ways in the early 90s. For some reason the Gen X folks here don't hear that, or didn't hear that. But maybe I'll post some more examples in the other thread. I did expect much more from that period culturally than what actually came through. Our generations didn't live up to potential (boomers too; why do we assume it's only people in their 20s who can make great music? What's up with that? Maybe because today we assume that music has to be sexy.). But most historians and observers agree, that in this period was a shift that changed the world. My prediction came true in spades in that respect.

Bob Dylan was a fabulous poet and prophet, and an inspired song-writer in both lyrics and music. People find whole worlds to explore in Dylan. I didn't like his voice either at first, and sometimes it's not melodious at all. But other times, especially in what he himself admits was his great period (1963-66), there is no voice more passionate and authentic, and it all comes together in his music to make it worthy of the legend that he is and the awards he receives. I'll have more Dylan favorites to post from each year going back to 63. Cool poster, and it refers to my favorite Dylan song to be posted later.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Almost done with the best year ever. I want to post this article so I don't lose it. It's a look ahead (uh, so to speak). I have already passed over two of these songs in this top ten, and will pass over others of them. But not #1.

http://www.durango-songwriters-expo.com/...inbow.html

Among words describing this song in the article are these: "one of the best songs ever" Smile

Hints of what's coming that I've been adding here and there (and everywhere).

I WILL be getting to the artist that one of those songs celebrates though, so I may link to it then.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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OK, one more. This is only a runner-up on my list, but I would like to include at least one song by "the voice," whom some experts say is the greatest singer of the 20th century. And most of them cite this song as among his best, even though it was by no means a big hit. But how appropriate that it came out (as a single) in the best year ever for pop and rock music! And the music of 1966 ages really well in these fine old kegs!





IT WAS A VERY GOOD YEAR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_Was_a_Very_Good_Year
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Near the end of 1965, I was never so glued to the radio, listening for this record to come on, and enjoying it every time; it was so good. In those days, a new hit record that got lots of requests would be played a whole lot. And sure enough it went to #2 by the end of the year, right behind Day Tripper by The Beatles. It's another great example of the organ in my favorite rock music too. And it was my #1 favorite for all of 1965.





I liked the commercial too. But The T-Bones took the music and made it into a sharp, bouyant sound that could flush the world with good vibes and bring all kinds of people together, no matter what their shape is. That's how I felt about the T-Bones' music, even though this was before hippies and psychedelia; although as it happened, that scene was just getting started at exactly the same time, as the great alignment of the planets was getting exact for the first time too.

Here's the original Alka-Seltzer commercial that had captivated America just a few months before. Despite the stated date, we did not see it on TV as early as 1964.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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Rubber Soul was the first album in which The Beatles started on their deeper path which they trod for a year or two. Here Paul and his new band play its greatest song, with "Michelle" in the audience. But it wasn't "my" Michelle!





Although "Michelle" was the standout track, its other good songs included Norwegian Wood, Girl and The Word. This album came out at the time Uranus and Pluto made their first conjunction in late 1965, as the "transformation," as I like to call it, or "the rock revolution," began. My favorite radio host and others called this album "hauntingly beautiful."
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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I always appreciated the song-writing and instrumental arrangements which Sonny and his associates put into Sonny & Cher songs. And Cher is a great singer too. My favorite song of theirs, Just You, was recorded and released early in 1965, but only became a hit late in the year when re-released after the success of "I Got You Babe." It reached the top 20 in the US, according to wikipedia. This is a truly great classic, not always recognized as such; and truly romantic. Really special; a masterpiece.





The follow up in 1966, another great melody and arrangement, didn't do as well but got to #49. The lyrics were less coherent and inviting than the romantic Just You; about a party that went on too long. But meaningful to me, for sure. What goes on inside us when we just can't connect to people? Another great Sonny & Cher song.



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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At exactly the same time "Just You" was re-released, this Bob Dylan song came out. Like "Just You," it also got a boost from its similar previous hit, "Like A Rolling Stone," which was exactly contemporary with "I Got You Babe," the similar preceding hit for Sonny and Cher to "Just You." And like "Just You," it struck me immediately for its beautiful melody and arrangement. Like the other great folk-rock songs of 1965 and 1966, these 2 songs portray the grace and scenic beauty of nature and the free-wheeling, gentle life like no other genre from any other time. In fact "Positively 4th Street" is another great organ rock song, with Al Kooper on organ and Mike Bloomfield on guitar. Like "Just You" too, it's about jealousy. But true to his horoscope, which features Mars in square to his Sun and other planets, no-one in 1965 could be as bitter as Bob. Oh Bob, such a put down, the DJs said. And it was just one of many put-down songs he wrote in this period, although this one is the most straightforward, lacking in his usual poetic imagery. The opening line "you got a lot of nerve to say you are my friend" even occurs again in his next single. He was exploring the problems in his relationships. People with Mars square Sun are known to quarrel and get angry. It's almost as if they would turn one hand against the other, if they have noone else to fight with, says expert astrologer Charles Carter. After his accident, he mellowed out and got religion.

As usual though, I didn't concern myself with the lyrics that much; I just liked the music. Part of its artistry, people say, is the contrast between the happy music and the angry words. As usual for Bob Dylan and The Beatles, actual videos of this song are hard to come by, but this recent live version is pretty good:





Maybe Gen Xers can relate to the negative lyrics. Like most successful rock and pop stars, it can be hard to get famous and then have to deal with all the pressures and resentments of people who want things from you and are jealous of you now that you are successful. People speculate who this song was specifically about, but I agree with those who say it's a composite. Dylan was a poet, and his songs were meant at least partly as universal statements. But no doubt his own experience was the catalyst for the song. The name 4th Street refers to Greenwich Village and also his university town in MN. I'd say this song fills a need for people.

Comment from website: I never really LISTENED to Dylan until I heard this sarcastic thumb to the eye piece some years back.
It is so simple musically, and Dylan's trademark nasal tone is at first unpleasant.
Then, you realize that his tone only makes it better, when the words come through so clearly.
Anger, betrayal, rebuke, and one of the best closing verbal slaps in music history.
Does it even matter which person this was written about?
I say it was written for all the backstabbers of the world.
http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=4902#

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positively_4th_Street
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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Along with "Turn Turn Turn," "My Generation" is considered a theme song for Generations and The Fourth Turning by readers of Strauss and Howe. I didn't know this before, but it was released almost exactly contemporary with the Byrds' version of Turn Turn Turn. It was a #2 hit in The Who's native UK, and reached the top 10 in other European and anglosphere countries, but was unknown to me because it was never played on the radio in the Bay Area or many other places in the US, and only reached #74 on the Billboard chart. I don't know why that was. Despite this, it has become one of The Who's most popular songs in the USA too, was performed at Woodstock together with Tommy songs and was featured on their hit 1970 Live at Leeds album. Pete considered this song their "anthem." It incapsulates Boomer youth rebellion and self-confidence (the famous Boomer arrogance and swagger), but has likely been adopted by many Gen Xer young people too, and is seen as proto punk rock. It was part of the beginning of the rock revolution in late 1965 because of its potent electronic/feedback sound-rush at the end. As such it is also seen as proto-psychedelic. It's the song that most clearly anticipates Pete Townshend's masterful composing ability shown in his later works, with their melodic power, underlying drones and power chords. The explosive ending when performed live was also the occasion for The Who's famous destruction of their own instruments on stage in their early days.





I first heard it only in late 1968 on an underground progressive FM rock station, and it became part of my background for adopting The Who as my favorite band in 1969. The Supremes and The Beatles had weaknesses as favorites, so I was eager to adopt them and join their large cult following. "My Generation" is the earliest Who song that makes my list here as one of the best songs ever.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Generation
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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If Frank Sinatra is considered the greatest male singer of the 20th century, Barbara Streisand may be considered the best female. I really liked this one from late 1965.





But, it's actually a beautiful remake of a longer 1921 original by Fanny Brice





I wonder how many other great 20s songs I may discover when I get there. I have a list somewhere to look from. Somewhere....

One of the salient features of late 1965-1967 pop was a 1920s style revival. The most famous examples were "Winchester Cathedral" by the New Vaudeville Band, "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" by Tiny Tim, and "Hello, Hello" by Sopwith Camel. Mr. Rudy Vallee pronounced the revival "the greatest thing that ever happened."

Winchester Cathedral
https://youtu.be/jKc1OCJ7iXk https://youtu.be/G2eWev_EfrM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester...ral_(song)
Tiny Tim, Tiptoe Through the Tulips
https://youtu.be/zcSlcNfThUA
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiptoe_Through_the_Tulips
Sopwith Camel live, original not available
https://youtu.be/kV7yD6lcChg
A later remix of Sopwith Camel, Hello Hello
https://youtu.be/01KNIvAmUyk
Tiny Tim sings Hello Hello
https://youtu.be/f7kUhUEKkqo
The Cowsills sing Hello Hello
https://youtu.be/1m5Vr3fg7g4
I Was Kaiser Bill's Batman
https://youtu.be/7fRS5nxYxoo
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

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Eric M
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