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the best songs ever
It's time for this one. The early 40s were undoubtedly the peak of Aaron Copland's career, as well as the peak of the big band era. This piece is also the peak of MY musical career, so far. I wrote a transcription for organ of this piece in 1986, and in recent years have made it available on my website, and received hundreds of requests for a copy. It shows how people all over America respond to this piece and need it to celebrate and mark their milestones in life. It is sometimes even thought of as an alternative national anthem. As the poster of this video says, however, it really belongs to all people. Fanfare for the Common Man (1942)





In spite of terrormarie's predictable reaction, I'm going to post this too:
http://philosopherswheel.com/sheetmusic.htm#Reviews of Fanfare
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-18-2016, 10:50 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: It's time for this one. The early 40s were undoubtedly the peak of Aaron Copland's career, as well as the peak of the big band era. This piece is also the peak of MY musical career, so far. I wrote a transcription for organ of this piece in 1986, and in recent years have made it available on my website, and received hundreds of requests for a copy. It shows how people all over America respond to this piece and need it to celebrate and mark their milestones in life. It is sometimes even thought of as an alternative national anthem. As the poster of this video says, however, it really belongs to all people. Fanfare for the Common Man (1942)





In spite of terrormarie's predictable reaction, I'm going to post this too:
http://philosopherswheel.com/sheetmusic.htm#Reviews of Fanfare

Well seeing as you have no problem name calling I will ask you this....you are not REALLY this ignorant of the obvious are you? People post you comments that are as clear as day and you either are blatantly stupid or willfully ignorant. I cannot decide which. But either way you ignore it and call people bullies or tell them to remove posts that clearly belong here. Never in my life met someone so ignorant, stubborn and intolerant of others yet preaches that he is tolerant. So much for being enlightened. It is amusing as you think everyone else is not enlightened when you cannot even see or hear those around you.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo - Glenn Miller band w/Tex Beneke & the Modernaires

I like this in spite of the very dated singing style of the group.





Typical 4T fare!

More info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(I%27ve_Go..._Kalamazoo

taramarie
The contents of this message are hidden because taramarie is on your ignore list.

snicker snicker!

Like FDR said in this era, I say about the terrorist marie: for pointing out the obvious, terrormarie is unrelenting in her hatred of me, and I welcome her hatred!
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-18-2016, 11:17 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: I've Got a Gal in Kalamazoo - Glenn Miller band w/Tex Beneke & the Modernaires

I like this in spite of the very dated singing style of the group.





Typical 4T fare!

More info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/(I%27ve_Go..._Kalamazoo

taramarie
The contents of this message are hidden because taramarie is on your ignore list.

snicker snicker!
psst that is because you are a pussy who loves to bully others but when called out on it cries in the corner that oh woe is me i am being terrorized. "Ignoring me" which you are not doing anyway as you read my comments, does not  make the truth any less real. It just means you bury your head in the sand. You do not like me because I tell the truth about you and i do not back down. I go by what you post and how you react. You dig your own grave.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
Pushing on, this song from 1941 was number one in early 1942. Glenn Miller's Band was the greatest of the era.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_String_of_Pearls_(song)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
Pardon me, boys and gals, and whatever the terrorist marie is:





This 1941 song became #1 on Pearl Harbor Day and remained so for many weeks in 1942.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chattanooga_Choo_Choo

I also liked the Harper's Bizarre version too, which was the only one I knew in 1967:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdHXZPRnwu8

"Boy the way Glenn Miller played! Songs that made the hit parade!"

Honorable mention, this one from 1945, published in 1944:
Judy Garland - On The Atchison, Topeka And The Santa Fe
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Atc...e_Santa_Fe
I got to ride that one.
(a portion reminds me of the Beach Boys song "All Summer Long" (1964) of course they were known for car songs, not train songs)
Judy also did the Trolley Song
https://youtu.be/0odXnKhKBxQ
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-18-2016, 11:54 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: Pardon me, boys and gals, and whatever the terrorist marie is:





This 1941 song became #1 on Pearl Harbor Day and remained so for many weeks in 1942.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chattanooga_Choo_Choo

I also liked the Harper's Bizarre version too, which was the only one I knew in 1967:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdHXZPRnwu8

Hahahahaha I am a Tara don't you know? hahahahaha for someone that "ignores me" you mention me a hell of a lot Pmsl My number one fan. Big Grin Tongue
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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What is it with this era and trains?





Duke Ellington
The song was first recorded on January 15, 1941 as a standard transcription for radio broadcast. The first (and most famous) commercial recording was made on February 15, 1941.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Take_the_%22A%22_Train
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
You are in my area. To be sure, many of the Big Band hits are not songs, strictly speaking.

This was highly-polished music... tuneful, tasteful, and even fun.

In a way, Mozart was a 'Big Band' composer. True greatness in any cultural expression depends upon fitting several levels of esthetic delight at once. Most works of classical music (most works by Handel, Haydn, Mozart, and Schubert are immediately accessible) are acquired tastes.  If you find Bach's fugues or Beethoven's late string quartets among the apices of musical expression you may have your justification -- but you also have rare sophistication in music because you have had adequate leisure at some point in your life. You haven't had to work ten hours a day at one job consistently or work two jobs just to survive as is becoming the American way of life.

... The Big Band musicians in at least one instance (Let's Dance) made an improvement over a classical work, Carl Maria von Weber's rambling Invitation to the Dance. Let's Dance  is superior to the original to the work whence it is derived in the one aspect that defines classical music from practically everything else: a tight formal structure.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(09-18-2016, 10:50 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: It's time for this one. The early 40s were undoubtedly the peak of Aaron Copland's career, as well as the peak of the big band era. This piece is also the peak of MY musical career, so far. I wrote a transcription for organ of this piece in 1986, and in recent years have made it available on my website, and received hundreds of requests for a copy. It shows how people all over America respond to this piece and need it to celebrate and mark their milestones in life. It is sometimes even thought of as an alternative national anthem. As the poster of this video says, however, it really belongs to all people. Fanfare for the Common Man (1942)





In spite of terrormarie's predictable reaction, I'm going to post this too:
http://philosopherswheel.com/sheetmusic.htm#Reviews of Fanfare

1942 -- when the fascists debasing the ordinary person everywhere, including even the supposed Master Races of Germany and Japan who had been turned from citizens to serfs, were still on the advance. People in the democracies needed to be reminded of what the war was about on their side, namely the defense of humane decencies established in the American and French Revolutions and the British reform era, and in spirit (if not fully in practice) the Bolshevik Revolution. The common man would defeat the fascists or the fascists would destroy everything good in life.

I think also of the Sandburg-Copland Lincoln Portrait, as clear a rejection of the new manifestations of slavery in the infernal empires of Germany and Japan as a rejection in Lincoln's words of the moribund slavery of the Confederacy. Not even Churchill or FDR could match those words of Lincoln as anti-fascist propaganda. The brave talk of "a new birth of freedom" (from the Gettysburg Address)  would be as necessary for defining victory in the Civil War of Western Civilization (better known as World War II) as in the American Civil War. I don;t know how significant it is, but while the Allies were recognizing a heroic death as a tragedy, the fascists were glorifying death in the name of the Fatherland or the Party.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(09-19-2016, 12:20 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: What is it with this era and trains?





Duke Ellington
The song was first recorded on January 15, 1941 as a standard transcription for radio broadcast. The first (and most famous) commercial recording was made on February 15, 1941.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Take_the_%22A%22_Train

 That's how musicians got around. Not aircraft or motor-coaches as they now do. Not horse-drawn carriages as they might have four decades earlier. Not by gondola (inspiring the many barcarolles) in the canals of Venice. Not steamships on the Mississippi River. Take the A Train refers to an elevated train... to Harlem?

Horses offered the clip-clop that one often hears in Strauss waltzes.  Jet aircraft might offer some monotonous sound not suggesting any music at all. I can't imagine anyone getting musical inspiration from a jet engine. A motorcycle? No sonic charm. Space craft? Submarines? Ludicrous. Trains? The regular chugging of the locomotives and the irregular whistles make some musical suggestions.





This is a 1944 recording of a work with some very different culture behind it... It is definitely inspired by the sounds of a locomotive.

Were I a composer I might think of a toy train with stations in San Francisco, Santa Cruz, and Monterrey. There has never been such a railroad, but no child is ever going to let that reality squelch such an imagination. There would be a chugging locomotive (eight to the bar, as for the Chattanooga Choo-Choo). (Would you rather have South Bend, Kokomo, and Indianapolis, where there really was a train route and probably is one now?)
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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(09-19-2016, 02:02 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:  That's how musicians got around. Not aircraft or motor-coaches as they now do. Not horse-drawn carriages as they might have four decades earlier. Not by gondola (inspiring the many barcarolles) in the canals of Venice. Not steamships on the Mississippi River. Take the A Train refers to an elevated train... to Harlem?

That must be the thing....

Quote:Horses offered the clip-clop that one often hears in Strauss waltzes.  Jet aircraft might offer some monotonous sound not suggesting any music at all. I can't imagine anyone getting musical inspiration from a jet engine. A motorcycle? No sonic charm. Space craft? Submarines? Ludicrous. Trains? The regular chugging of the locomotives and the irregular whistles make some musical suggestions.
That's got that swing.

I dunno tho; the national #1 hit song of 1967 featured a jet plane sound at the end.

Quote:This is a 1944 recording of a work with some very different culture behind it... It is definitely inspired by the sounds of a locomotive.

What song are you referring to? The video does not play.

Quote:Were I a composer I might think of a toy train with stations in San Francisco, Santa Cruz, and Monterrey. There has never been such a railroad, but no child is ever going to let that reality squelch such an imagination.

Our railroad goes from SF to San Jose, and long ago we had a railroad from San Jose to Santa Cruz. There are railroad tracks along the Santa Cruz Boardwalk too. There was a proposal to bring back the train to Santa Cruz, but it was blocked because mountain residents didn't want the noise.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-19-2016, 02:02 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: Horses offered the clip-clop that one often hears in Strauss waltzes.  Jet aircraft might offer some monotonous sound not suggesting any music at all. I can't imagine anyone getting musical inspiration from a jet engine. A motorcycle? No sonic charm. Space craft? Submarines? Ludicrous. Trains? The regular chugging of the locomotives and the irregular whistles make some musical suggestions.



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(09-19-2016, 02:46 AM)Eric the Green Wrote:
Quote:This is a 1944 recording of a work with some very different culture behind it... It is definitely inspired by the sounds of a locomotive.

What song are you referring to? The video does not play.


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It's also about music... and historical perspective never is far away from the topic of culture or events in time here.

Big-Band Era music was undeniably fun as well as masterful (see also Strauss waltzes and polkas, and just about everything the beatles were involved in)... and thus it must be considered great.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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It's definitely about music; "songs" is just the name I'm using because of the One Direction song. Yes, music illuminates the times in which it was composed.

Sir George Thomas Thalben-Ball CBE (18 June 1896 – 18 January 1987) was an organist and composer who, though originally from Australia, spent most of his life in Britain.

George Thalben-Ball composed several anthems and organ works, of which the best known is his meditative Elegy for organ, which was played, for example, at the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales. This piece originated in an improvisation which Thalben-Ball played at the end of a live BBC daily religious service during World War II, when the service finished a couple of minutes earlier than expected. So many listeners to the broadcast telephoned the BBC to ask what the composition was, that he decided to write down his improvisation as well as he could remember it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Thalben-Ball





Bjork "Army of Me" is from 1995, and fits those times. The wiki article says it was well-received by music critics. I receive it well too. Unlike Rags' post, it is at least tangentially related to the current posts on this thread because of the "transportation" question. It would fit on the "lost years" thread as well.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_of_Me...B6rk_song)
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-19-2016, 10:13 AM)pbrower2a Wrote: It's also about music... and historical perspective never is far away from the topic of culture or events in time here.

Big-Band Era music was undeniably fun as well as masterful (see also Strauss waltzes and polkas, and just about everything the beatles were involved in)... and thus it must be considered great.

So, post more examples! I only have a few more to go, in temporal order going backwards. And they are the obvious choices. And the title of one of those kinda addresses the question of "songs" or "music."
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(09-19-2016, 12:11 PM)Eric the Green Wrote: It's definitely about music; "songs" is just the name I'm using because of the One Direction song. Yes, music illuminates the times in which it was composed.

Sir George Thomas Thalben-Ball CBE (18 June 1896 – 18 January 1987) was an organist and composer who, though originally from Australia, spent most of his life in Britain.

George Thalben-Ball composed several anthems and organ works, of which the best known is his meditative Elegy for organ, which was played, for example, at the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales. This piece originated in an improvisation which Thalben-Ball played at the end of a live BBC daily religious service during World War II, when the service finished a couple of minutes earlier than expected. So many listeners to the broadcast telephoned the BBC to ask what the composition was, that he decided to write down his improvisation as well as he could remember it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Thalben-Ball





Bjork "Army of Me" is from 1995, and fits those times. The wiki article says it was well-received by music critics. I receive it well too. Unlike Rags' post, it is at least tangentially related to the current posts on this thread because of the "transportation" question. It would fit on the "lost years" thread as well.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_of_Me...B6rk_song)

I never heard you complaining when I was posting songs that I thought were "the best" and they were not in order. Why pick on him for not being on time to post what he wants? Ohhhhhhh because you despise the songs he likes and you want the "trash" he likes away from your "perfect song thread" right?
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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Lincoln's powerful words, as applicable to both the American Civil War and World War II, Aaron Copland again.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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