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Generational Dynamics World View
So selfish Boomers prevent other countries from exercising their sovereign rights in the middle east, Syria in particular as well as in Asia, while at the same time preventing anyone younger than them from exercising their constitutional rights in the US and their national/federal rights in the case of Europe. The boomers ARE the 4T crisis, that is the case because western boomers are placing the survival of the human race in question simply in order to impose their disgusting utopia where every country in the world has a democratic global-minded government established there. Turkey, Russia, Syria, China, and other countries are merely exercising their sovereign rights, as well as Xers, Millies and younger people within the west. It is the boomer who seeks to lobotomize the human condition. The Boomer establishment will NOT succeed in this goal.
Reply
(01-21-2018, 11:33 AM)Cynic Hero 86 Wrote: > So selfish Boomers prevent other countries from exercising their
> sovereign rights in the middle east, Syria in particular as well
> as in Asia, while at the same time preventing anyone younger than
> them from exercising their constitutional rights in the US and
> their national/federal rights in the case of Europe. The boomers
> ARE the 4T crisis, that is the case because western boomers are
> placing the survival of the human race in question simply in order
> to impose their disgusting utopia where every country in the world
> has a democratic global-minded government established
> there. Turkey, Russia, Syria, China, and other countries are
> merely exercising their sovereign rights, as well as Xers, Millies
> and younger people within the west. It is the boomer who seeks to
> lobotomize the human condition. The Boomer establishment will NOT
> succeed in this goal.

Wait a minute. Isn't this message just a copy and paste of your last
200 messages?

You must REALLY hate your father.
Reply
Tell me, why when the Serbs waged war in Bosnia back in the 1990s and as the war developed they were finally ready to assault the Bosnian cities in particular, why was there suddenly the appearance of a screen of American and European troops suddenly blocking them? Serbs had done nothing wrong to Americans and Western Europeans, so there was no reason for that screen of forces to be there. The motivations for placing that screen of troops by Western politicians was purely due to the selfishness of western baby boomers and the manifestation of that selfishness.
Reply
(01-21-2018, 09:11 PM)Cynic Hero Wrote: Tell me, why when the Serbs waged war in Bosnia back in the 1990s and as the war developed they were finally ready to assault the Bosnian cities in particular, why was there suddenly the appearance a screen of American and European troops suddenly blocking them? Serbs had done nothing wrong to Americans and Western Europeans, so there was no reason for that screen of forces to be there. The motivations for placing that screen of troops by Western politicians was purely due to the selfishness of western baby boomers and the manifestation of that selfishness.

Maybe it is simpler than that. Murder universally offends the sensibilities of practically everyone. If forty years earlier the victims were Jews and this time the victims were Muslims... so what? It is still wrong. Smaller scale? I find a robbery-murder in a convenience store appalling. If to save one life is to save the world, as one saying goes, to murder one person is at the least a murder of the world.

The British, Americans, and Soviets could do only one thing to thwart the Holocaust, and that was to hasten the victory over the demonic power killing so many people.  But dealing with Serb butchers was far easier. We could do something this time.


Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.

"Selfish Boomers"? Sure. I can tell you all about Boomer elites in ownership, management, and politics. They treat anyone not born into their class like peons and expect us (including Boomers like me not part of such an elite)
to consider such treatment beneficence. Maybe they would have been nicer had they had to do farm chores as kids. Maybe they would be nicer had they not had rooms all to themselves in the Suburbia of the post-WWII era. Maybe they would treat others better had they not found it so easy to avoid doing military service in Vietnam.  The worst Boomers got to grow up like aristocrats , and they could never recognize that their privilege resulted from the toil of others. Those of us Boomers who knew some hardships in life, whether poverty or a handicap, or even doing unglamorous military service, are much more decent. Unfortunately the Boomer elites have deemed us disloyal for having some chips on our shoulders and unworthy of opportunity, so we don't get to shape economic and bureaucratic decisions in more humane ways. 

Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.



Xenakis may be wrong about you. You probably hate your mother just as much as you hate your father. Get help!
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool" -- William Shakespeare, As You Like It, V.i


Reply
*** 22-Jan-18 World View -- Multiple Afghanistan Taliban terror attacks leave 'victory' plans in tatters

This morning's key headlines from GenerationalDynamics.com
  • Multiple Afghanistan Taliban terror attacks leave 'victory' plans in tatters
  • Sunday's attacks throw new doubts into claims of 'victory' in Afghanistan

****
**** Multiple Afghanistan Taliban terror attacks leave 'victory' plans in tatters
****


[Image: g180121b.jpg]
The enormous Kabul Intercontinental Hotel that was under attack for 16 hours this weekend (Tolo News)

The claims by the Afghanistan government and the US-led coalition
forces that the Taliban is finally under control were completely
undermined this weekend by three separate terrorist attacks by the
Taliban.

The most spectacular of the attacks was a 16 hour siege of the
Intercontinental Hotel in the capital city Kabul. Attackers dressed
in army uniforms and armed with automatic weapons stormed the hotel on
Saturday evening. They sprayed the areas with bullets, and forcibly
entered some rooms and killed the people inside.

Social media showed parts of the building catch fire, after which
guests tied sheets together to escape from their rooms.

Afghan security forces fought the attacks in a gun battle that lasted
well into Sunday. Afghan government officials says that four Afghan
civilians and 14 foreigners were among those killed. Other reports
indicate that the death toll was well over 30.

A Taliban spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid, claimed credit for the
attack, saying, "Our five fighters, Bilal, Ayubi, Khalil, Bashar and
Abid entered the building and conducted the operation that resulted in
the death of 10 foreigners and Afghan government officials." However,
Afghan government officials say that there were only four attackers.

This was not the only Taliban terrorist attack to occur on Sunday.

In Balkh province in northern Afghanistan, the Taliban claimed credit
for an attack that killed 18 Afghanistan militiamen on Sunday.

In Herat province in western Afghanistan, eight people were killed by
a roadside bomb. No one claimed credit, but it's assumed that the
Taliban were responsible. The Taliban were probably targeting police
or the Afghan military, but since the eight people killed were
ordinary civilians, the Taliban would want to avoid the bad publicity
of claiming credit.

There is one thing about Sunday's attacks that I found very
interesting: That there were no claims of credit from the so-called
Islamic State (IS or ISIS or ISIL or Daesh). Usually, a militia in
the Taliban carries out these terror attacks, and then the ISIS public
relations agency, Amaq, claims credit for the attack, even though ISIS
was not involved and probably didn't even know it was going to happen
until the read about it online. Now that ISIS has been defeated in
both Syria and Iraq, and the "Islamic State" brand name has been
thoroughly humiliated, it may be that the Amaq PR agency is no longer
in business. At any rate, Taliban terror groups that used to vow
allegiance to ISIS are apparently now back to being just plain, old
Taliban terror groups. Tolo News (Kabul) and Fox News and Al Jazeera and Reuters

****
**** Sunday's attacks throw new doubts into claims of 'victory' in Afghanistan
****


As I've been writing for years, based on a Generational Dynamics
analysis, a "victory" in Afghanistan is impossible. Afghanistan's
last generational crisis war was the extremely bloody Afghan crisis
civil war, 1991-96, which mostly pitted the ethnic Pashtuns, who are
Sunni Muslims and later formed the Taliban, versus the Northern
Alliance of Tajiks, Hazaras and Uzbeks in northern Afghanistan. Now,
twenty years later, Afghanistan is in a generational Awakening era,
and a new young generation of Pashtuns is coming of age, raised on
stories their parents told them about the atrocities committed by the
Northern Alliance, and they're looking for revenge.

There is absolutely no way that this new young generation of Pashtuns
are going to enter into any "peace process" with representatives of
the hated Northern Alliance, brokered by the old geezers in the Kabul
government, supported by the United States. The whole concept of such
a "peace process" is so completely ridiculous and absurd that you'd
have to be a full-time resident of Fantasyland to think that it's
possible.

So the Taliban attack on the International Hotel in Kabul on Sunday
was intended to destroy the credibility of the Afghan government and
the US-led coalition, and it undoubtedly succeeded.

A massive car bombing in Kabul in July
of last year killed 36 and wounded dozens more. It was an
attack on the ethnic Hazara community in Kabul, and the Hazaras were
one of the ethnic groups in the Northern Alliance fighting the
Pashtuns.

In August of last year, dozens of civilian men, women and children,
mostly Hazara Shia Muslims, were massacred in a two-day gun battle
in northern Afghanistan. About 50
people were shot and killed, 30 houses were torched and burned to the
ground, several mosques were set ablaze, and an unknown number of
villagers were taken hostages. Seven Afghan troops and 12 Taliban
militants were killed in the fighting.

With regard to the two other attacks on Sunday, in Balkh province in
northern Afghanistan and Herat province in western Afghanistan, news
reports don't indicate what ethnic groups were targeted, but it's
almost certain that the targets were government forces or Northern
Alliance ethnic groups.

These kinds of attacks are not going to stop. In fact, as more and
more members of this young Pashtun generation come of age, the attacks
are going to increase.

As I wrote in an analysis last year,
the Trump administration is probably well aware that there is
no hope of any meaningful "victory" in Afghanistan, but they may have
a larger purpose in mind. There are several American military bases
in Afghanistan, including two air bases in Bagram and Kandahar
International Airport. These bases will be valuable in any future war
with China. So remaining in Afghanistan allows us continued use of
those bases, as the war with China and Pakistan approaches.

This may be a similar strategy to the one that the US military is
following in Syria. The US announced a "Border Security Force" (BSF)
and a continuing commitment of forces to Syria to avoid repeating
the 2011 Iraq withdrawal blunder

without leaving any forces behind, allowing the rise of ISIS in Iraq.
The US has backed off from the BSF, now calling it a kind of local
police force, but its purpose is the same - to maintain a residual
American force in Syria to prevent a resurgence of ISIS. The strategy
in Afghanistan is similar -- maintain a residual force in Afghanistan,
not with the hope of defeating the Taliban, but with the ability to
maintain and support valuable military bases.

This is an extremely complex strategy, but it makes a great deal of
sense as war with China and Pakistan approaches. In the meanwhile, we
should expect a lot more bad news. Khaama Press (Kabul) and Stars and Stripes and Tolo News (Kabul)

Related Articles


KEYS: Generational Dynamics, Afghanistan, Kabul, Intercontinental Hotel,
Taliban, Zabihullah Mujahid, Herat province, Balkh province,
Islamic State / of Iraq and Syria/Sham/the Levant, IS, ISIS, ISIL, Daesh,
Amaq public relations agency, Pashtuns,
Northern Alliance, Tajiks, Hazaras, Uzbeks,
Bagram, Kandahar International Airport,
Syria, Border Security Force, BSF

Permanent web link to this article
Receive daily World View columns by e-mail
Contribute to Generational Dynamics via PayPal

John J. Xenakis
100 Memorial Drive Apt 8-13A
Cambridge, MA 02142
Phone: 617-864-0010
E-mail: john@GenerationalDynamics.com
Web site: http://www.GenerationalDynamics.com
Forum: http://www.gdxforum.com/forum
Subscribe to World View: http://generationaldynamics.com/subscribe
Reply
(01-21-2018, 10:50 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(01-21-2018, 09:11 PM)Cynic Hero Wrote: Tell me, why when the Serbs waged war in Bosnia back in the 1990s and as the war developed they were finally ready to assault the Bosnian cities in particular, why was there suddenly the appearance a screen of American and European troops suddenly blocking them? Serbs had done nothing wrong to Americans and Western Europeans, so there was no reason for that screen of forces to be there. The motivations for placing that screen of troops by Western politicians was purely due to the selfishness of western baby boomers and the manifestation of that selfishness.

Maybe it is simpler than that. Murder universally offends the sensibilities of practically everyone. If forty years earlier the victims were Jews and this time the victims were Muslims... so what? It is still wrong. Smaller scale? I find a robbery-murder in a convenience store appalling. If to save one life is to save the world, as one saying goes, to murder one person is at the least a murder of the world.

The British, Americans, and Soviets could do only one thing to thwart the Holocaust, and that was to hasten the victory over the demonic power killing so many people.  But dealing with Serb butchers was far easier. We could do something this time.


Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.

"Selfish Boomers"? Sure. I can tell you all about Boomer elites in ownership, management, and politics. They treat anyone not born into their class like peons and expect us (including Boomers like me not part of such an elite)
to consider such treatment beneficence. Maybe they would have been nicer had they had to do farm chores as kids. Maybe they would be nicer had they not had rooms all to themselves in the Suburbia of the post-WWII era. Maybe they would treat others better had they not found it so easy to avoid doing military service in Vietnam.  The worst Boomers got to grow up like aristocrats , and they could never recognize that their privilege resulted from the toil of others. Those of us Boomers who knew some hardships in life, whether poverty or a handicap, or even doing unglamorous military service, are much more decent. Unfortunately the Boomer elites have deemed us disloyal for having some chips on our shoulders and unworthy of opportunity, so we don't get to shape economic and bureaucratic decisions in more humane ways.   

Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.



Xenakis may be wrong about you. You probably hate your mother just as much as you hate your father. Get help!

I don't remember a vote ever being held regarding intervention in Bosnia, or Iraq or Somalia, or Syria. The government never asks the citizenry for its permission first as it is supposed to as outlined under the constitution.
Reply
*** 23-Jan-18 World View -- More than 100,000 Greeks hold mass protest over 'Macedonia' name change

This morning's key headlines from GenerationalDynamics.com
  • Greece and Macedonia negotiate a contentious name change to replace FYROM
  • Massive protests in Thessaloniki Greece threaten Tsipras government

****
**** Greece and Macedonia negotiate a contentious name change to replace FYROM
****


[Image: g180122b.jpg]
Hundreds of thousands of Greeks in Thessaloniki on Sunday protest any name change to the Republic of Macedonia that includes the word 'Macedonia' (Kathimerini)

One of the most emotional issues in Greece and the Balkans is taking
center stage over negotiations to change the name of the official
Republic of Macedonia to one that is acceptable to Greece. The
Kingdom of Macedon is an ancient name, dating back centuries BC, and
is the birthplace, in 356 BC, of Alexander the Great.

The Republic of Macedonia declared independence from Yugoslavia in
1991, but Greece objected to its use of that name, claiming that
having that name would give the country a claim to Greece's own
province of Macedonia. The country was admitted to the United Nations
in 1993 under the name the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
(FYROM). It has also been admitted to the World Bank and the
International Monetary Fund (IMF) under the name FYROM. The European
Union and Nato also recognize only the name FYROM. However many
countries, including Russia and the United States, also recognize the
name Republic of Macedonia, or just Macedonia.

Greece has repeatedly used its veto power to prevent the country
Macedonia from joining either the EU or Nato under any name that
contains the word "Macedonia." As this situation has been going on
for 25 years, there is now a great deal of pressure on the two
countries to come up with a compromise.

The Greek government of prime minister Alexis Tsipras has indicated
that it is willing to allow "Macedonia" to appear in the name,
provided that it's modified or qualified in some way. There are five
proposals on the table:
  • The Republic of New Macedonia
  • The Republic of Northern Macedonia
  • The Republic of Upper Macedonia
  • The Vardar Republic of Macedonia
  • The Republic of Macedonia (Skopje)

The last proposal references the capital city Skopje. The name Vardar
refers to a river that rises in West Macedonia and then south into
Greece, where it is called the Axios River.

Tsipras will be meeting his counterpart, FYROM prime minister Zoran
Zaev, on Wednesday on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in the
Swiss town of Davos, and both men indicate that they'd like to resolve
the issue once and for all, if that's possible. Meta (Macedonia) and B92 (Belgrade) and RFERL and AP (18-Jan)

****
**** Massive protests in Thessaloniki Greece threaten Tsipras government
****


More than 100,000 Greeks rallied on Sunday in Thessaloniki (Salonica),
the capital city of Greece's administrative region of Macedonia. They
were protesting any name change to the country Macedonia that included
the name "Macedonia." In particular, they objected to all five of the
proposed compromise names listed above.

A poll shows that over 68% of the Greek people oppose agreeing to any
use of "Macedonia" in the new name. Politicians from the opposition
party New Democracy are siding with the protesters. The Archbishop of
Athens Ieronymos initially agreed with the protesters, but after a
meeting with Tsipras said that the country now needs "unity" and
"national solidarity" with whatever agreement is reached in Davos.

In April of last year, I wrote an article on Macedonia,
and I included a brief history of Alexander
the Great, referring to him as "the most famous leader in Macedonia's
history." I was astounded when this description resulted in an
extremely vitriolic and long-running comment stream, with comments
coming from all sides -- especially the Macedonians, the Greeks, the
Albanians and the Bulgarians.

In summary, Greek commenters said the following:
  • Alexander the Great was Greek, and in fact all Macedonians at
    the time were Greek.

  • Macedonians don't exist any more. The country was taken over by
    Albanians, and colonized by ethnic Bulgarians in the Middle Ages.
    Today's "Macedonians" are really ethnic Bulgarians, with no ties to
    ancient Macedonia.

  • Macedonia is a fake country. It should be split up, with the west
    given to Albania and the east to Bulgaria.

Macedonian comments said the following:
  • There are Russian and Turkish documents from the 1700s clearly
    referring to Macedonian as distinct from Serbians or Bulgarians. The
    oldest surviving identity in Europe is Macedonian.

  • Macedonians don't want to be part of Bulgaria, and the Bulgarians
    don't want the Macedonians, because they are Macedonians.

These comments became extremely acrimonious and went on for a long
time. At one point I asked the participants whether there would be
blood on the floor if they were all in the same room together. I
didn't get an answer. All this indicates to me that the Balkans
region, which has been the site of repeated crisis wars throughout
history between the Christian civilization and the Muslim
civilization, may well provide the start of the next major European
war.

Into that context, we now have this emerging issue of the name change
for the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia to something else.
We'll have to see whether there's anything else that everyone can
agree to. Kathimerini (Athens) and B92 (Belgrade) and Greek Reporter and Meta (Macedonia)

Related Articles


KEYS: Generational Dynamics, Greece, Macedonia, Balkans, Yugoslavia,
Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander the Great,
Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, FYROM,
Alexis Tsipras, Zoran Zaev, Vardar River, Axios River,
Thessaloniki, Salonica, Archbishop Ieronymos

Permanent web link to this article
Receive daily World View columns by e-mail
Contribute to Generational Dynamics via PayPal

John J. Xenakis
100 Memorial Drive Apt 8-13A
Cambridge, MA 02142
Phone: 617-864-0010
E-mail: john@GenerationalDynamics.com
Web site: http://www.GenerationalDynamics.com
Forum: http://www.gdxforum.com/forum
Subscribe to World View: http://generationaldynamics.com/subscribe
Reply
(Yesterday, 08:31 AM)Cynic Hero Wrote:
(01-21-2018, 10:50 PM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(01-21-2018, 09:11 PM)Cynic Hero Wrote: Tell me, why when the Serbs waged war in Bosnia back in the 1990s and as the war developed they were finally ready to assault the Bosnian cities in particular, why was there suddenly the appearance a screen of American and European troops suddenly blocking them? Serbs had done nothing wrong to Americans and Western Europeans, so there was no reason for that screen of forces to be there. The motivations for placing that screen of troops by Western politicians was purely due to the selfishness of western baby boomers and the manifestation of that selfishness.

Maybe it is simpler than that. Murder universally offends the sensibilities of practically everyone. If forty years earlier the victims were Jews and this time the victims were Muslims... so what? It is still wrong. Smaller scale? I find a robbery-murder in a convenience store appalling. If to save one life is to save the world, as one saying goes, to murder one person is at the least a murder of the world.

The British, Americans, and Soviets could do only one thing to thwart the Holocaust, and that was to hasten the victory over the demonic power killing so many people.  But dealing with Serb butchers was far easier. We could do something this time.


Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.

"Selfish Boomers"? Sure. I can tell you all about Boomer elites in ownership, management, and politics. They treat anyone not born into their class like peons and expect us (including Boomers like me not part of such an elite)
to consider such treatment beneficence. Maybe they would have been nicer had they had to do farm chores as kids. Maybe they would be nicer had they not had rooms all to themselves in the Suburbia of the post-WWII era. Maybe they would treat others better had they not found it so easy to avoid doing military service in Vietnam.  The worst Boomers got to grow up like aristocrats , and they could never recognize that their privilege resulted from the toil of others. Those of us Boomers who knew some hardships in life, whether poverty or a handicap, or even doing unglamorous military service, are much more decent. Unfortunately the Boomer elites have deemed us disloyal for having some chips on our shoulders and unworthy of opportunity, so we don't get to shape economic and bureaucratic decisions in more humane ways.   

Selfish? I consider the effort to thwart Serb butchers a consummately selfless act.



Xenakis may be wrong about you. You probably hate your mother just as much as you hate your father. Get help!

I don't remember a vote ever being held regarding intervention in Bosnia, or Iraq or Somalia, or Syria. The government never asks the citizenry for its permission first as it is supposed to as outlined under the constitution.

Boomers Just don't get it, under constitutional democracy, this should have happened regarding intervention in bosnia. 

1.) the Government requests intervention in Bosnia.

2.) a referendum is scheduled to vote on intervention in Bosnia.

3.) The referendum is held and their is mass vote on the question of intervention.

4.) The results of the referendum are read, if the vote was yes, we intervene, if the vote was no we don't intervene at all unless another referendum is held later and it's vote was yes.

5.) If a "no" vote occurred, the government says it will not do anything in Bosnia because the citizenry have not given the government consent to do so and under the US constitution the government can't make any decisions that are contrary to the will of the people because the government represents the people under US Law.
Reply


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