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the best songs ever
(06-10-2016, 12:15 AM)gabrielle Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 10:14 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 07:41 PM)gabrielle Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 07:29 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: That many people who say they don't like Bieber (I don't know who Beiber is) are older, is an objective fact. There are polls on that too. Some of us older folks liking his music anyway is also an objective fact. My statement that it's sometimes prejudice to not like Bieber is my opinion, although in many cases a valid one. Maybe for many, like gabrielle, songs like Good Time and Pray sound like music for kids, and they don't like that. Myself, I am looking past that, and I hear music that I like a lot in some of those songs. I know from all the thousands of you tube covers of Good Time, and the people who sang on them (sometimes thousands in one video), that a lot of them were 20 or 30-somethings. So that's an "objective fact" that many people who liked that popular song were not "kids."

I also know that many Gen X and some older millie listeners are used to stuff that is rough, edgy and cynical, and the upbeat and simple stuff in 4T millie pop doesn't jive with what they have learned to appreciate and which "expresses their experience." To me, the new simpler and upbeat millie pop is sometimes a relief and a joy.

Here is a song from that window of time you consider a void of creativity in popular music.  It has as catchy a tune as any Millennial pop song; its mood just as simple and upbeat (though if you listen closely to the lyrics they seem better suited to the Nomad's more ambivalent childhood/youth experience).

This is also what I would consider "kid's music."  It was our kid's music; my particular cohort (I was probably 11 or 12 when this song was released) was the audience for this type of pop--New Wave synthpop.  It was mainly teens and tweens buying this music in the early to mid 80s, often in cassette form to listen to in their Walkmans.  But to my knowledge, this music did not appeal to core Boomers, at least not to any great extent.  They had simply outgrown this sort of thing.

Not that there's anything wrong with liking simple, upbeat pop music as an adult!  I just think it is a type of music that usually tends to appeal more to children.  Perhaps I was being too harsh calling the Owl City song "awful."



Bugger the link is not available. My location no doubt.

It is "Fascination" by the Human League.
Just sat down and listening to it now. I like it.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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(06-09-2016, 09:38 PM)Eric the Green Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 07:41 PM)gabrielle Wrote: Here is a song from that window of time you consider a void of creativity in popular music.  It has as catchy a tune as any Millennial pop song; its mood just as simple and upbeat (though if you listen closely to the lyrics they seem better suited to the Nomad's more ambivalent childhood/youth experience).
The 3T was not a void; I just say it was not as good. It has even more lousy pop than usual (all eras have lousy pop), and the best of it was not as good; as I heard it. Your post is interesting, though. That's a nice try. It's not bad, and has a good rhythm; but the problem for me is that the mood and melody of the song lacks something hard to describe. It wanders, and does not strike fire in my heart. I think that's an attitude of those times. Like other New Wave-era pop it avoids the grand and the dynamic in favor of something else hard to describe. I don't know exactly what a more positive term for it would be. Ambivalent, maybe. Reflecting a bored rejection of the scene they grew up in; preferring an "OK, whatever" attitude to the boomer passions.

Quote:This is also what I would consider "kid's music."  It was our kid's music; my particular cohort (I was probably 11 or 12 when this song was released) was the audience for this type of pop--New Wave synthpop.  It was mainly teens and tweens buying this music in the early to mid 80s, often in cassette form to listen to in their Walkmans.  But to my knowledge, this music did not appeal to core Boomers, at least not to any great extent.  They had simply outgrown this sort of thing.
Really? It didn't strike me as kids' music. Of course, the "New Wave" aspect might be the problem for me, as it tended toward the bland and aimless. But the synthpop part appeals to me; "Good Time" is of course a later example from that same genre. For me, the synthesizers I turned to in the 3T were of course in the New Age genre, rather than the New Wave genre.

Quote:Not that there's anything wrong with liking simple, upbeat pop music as an adult!  I just think it is a type of music that usually tends to appeal more to children.  Perhaps I was being too harsh calling the Owl City song "awful."

That's right. Although in the case of Good Time, it did also appeal to adults.

I'm pretty sure my parents thought of New Wave pop as "kid's music," lol.  But they tolerated it.  They certainly didn't call it "lousy" as you do.  They even liked some of it.  They both liked Michael Jackson, for example--both his music and his dancing.  (He might not have been "New Wave" exactly, but he was a pop musician from the same era.)  

"It wanders, and does not strike fire in my heart. I think that's an attitude of those times. Like other New Wave-era pop it avoids the grand and the dynamic in favor of something else hard to describe. I don't know exactly what a more positive term for it would be. Ambivalent, maybe. Reflecting a bored rejection of the scene they grew up in; preferring an "OK, whatever" attitude to the boomer passions."

That is the Boomer narrative, yes:  that Generation X was bored and cynical, that they rejected the admirable visions and passions of their elders.  Since there is no logical reason why anyone would reject such obvious righteousness, there must be something "bad" about Generation X.  Yes, you guys think really highly of yourselves.  Remember, we grew up watching you.  Grew up watching the counter-culture revolution getting dropped the moment the draft was, and the idealist generation settling into complacency and materialism.

"Scratch any cynic and you'll find a disappointed idealist."  --George Carlin (1937-2008)

"All cynicism masks a failure to cope."  --John Fowles (1926-2005)
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(06-10-2016, 02:13 AM)gabrielle Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 09:38 PM)Eric the Green Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 07:41 PM)gabrielle Wrote: Here is a song from that window of time you consider a void of creativity in popular music.  It has as catchy a tune as any Millennial pop song; its mood just as simple and upbeat (though if you listen closely to the lyrics they seem better suited to the Nomad's more ambivalent childhood/youth experience).
The 3T was not a void; I just say it was not as good. It has even more lousy pop than usual (all eras have lousy pop), and the best of it was not as good; as I heard it. Your post is interesting, though. That's a nice try. It's not bad, and has a good rhythm; but the problem for me is that the mood and melody of the song lacks something hard to describe. It wanders, and does not strike fire in my heart. I think that's an attitude of those times. Like other New Wave-era pop it avoids the grand and the dynamic in favor of something else hard to describe. I don't know exactly what a more positive term for it would be. Ambivalent, maybe. Reflecting a bored rejection of the scene they grew up in; preferring an "OK, whatever" attitude to the boomer passions.

Quote:This is also what I would consider "kid's music."  It was our kid's music; my particular cohort (I was probably 11 or 12 when this song was released) was the audience for this type of pop--New Wave synthpop.  It was mainly teens and tweens buying this music in the early to mid 80s, often in cassette form to listen to in their Walkmans.  But to my knowledge, this music did not appeal to core Boomers, at least not to any great extent.  They had simply outgrown this sort of thing.
Really? It didn't strike me as kids' music. Of course, the "New Wave" aspect might be the problem for me, as it tended toward the bland and aimless. But the synthpop part appeals to me; "Good Time" is of course a later example from that same genre. For me, the synthesizers I turned to in the 3T were of course in the New Age genre, rather than the New Wave genre.

Quote:Not that there's anything wrong with liking simple, upbeat pop music as an adult!  I just think it is a type of music that usually tends to appeal more to children.  Perhaps I was being too harsh calling the Owl City song "awful."

That's right. Although in the case of Good Time, it did also appeal to adults.

I'm pretty sure my parents thought of New Wave pop as "kid's music," lol.  But they tolerated it.  They certainly didn't call it "lousy" as you do.  They even liked some of it.  They both liked Michael Jackson, for example--both his music and his dancing.  (He might not have been "New Wave" exactly, but he was a pop musician from the same era.)  

"It wanders, and does not strike fire in my heart. I think that's an attitude of those times. Like other New Wave-era pop it avoids the grand and the dynamic in favor of something else hard to describe. I don't know exactly what a more positive term for it would be. Ambivalent, maybe. Reflecting a bored rejection of the scene they grew up in; preferring an "OK, whatever" attitude to the boomer passions."

That is the Boomer narrative, yes:  that Generation X was bored and cynical, that they rejected the admirable visions and passions of their elders.  Since there is no logical reason why anyone would reject such obvious righteousness, there must be something "bad" about Generation X.  Yes, you guys think really highly of yourselves.  Remember, we grew up watching you.  Grew up watching the counter-culture revolution getting dropped the moment the draft was, and the idealist generation settling into complacency and materialism.

"Scratch any cynic and you'll find a disappointed idealist."  --George Carlin (1937-2008)

"All cynicism masks a failure to cope."  --John Fowles (1926-2005)
I love that xer music that Eric calls lousy and I will tell you why. A lot of it is crying out the frustrations of that generation and the sound matters when it comes to that raw emotion. The sound Eric does not understand due to the fact he has not the ear for it to quote him. A fact he would rather ignore than face. I understand the sound and i understand the frustration (at least some of it) given I am not an xer. But the world is built to be unfavorable to certain generations and that includes the younger generations. That sound is born of that frustration and therefore has its own voice as well as the singer adding to it. Keep it up xers. At least us millies adore it!
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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I actually found it amusing that Eric was saying that music like Heavy Metal should change its sound to be more beautiful for lack of a better word. I on the other hand am aware that would destroy the whole mood of the song. I think of it this way. When i was a teenager, in creative writing class i was in a group. We were told to pick a colour and write in that colour. Meaning that colour would be the "feel" or "mood" of the poem. The tone is everything. Same thing with music. The sound is everything. The sound evokes a mood, like the colour of a poem.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
(06-10-2016, 02:13 AM)gabrielle Wrote: I'm pretty sure my parents thought of New Wave pop as "kid's music," lol.  But they tolerated it.  They certainly didn't call it "lousy" as you do.  They even liked some of it.  They both liked Michael Jackson, for example--both his music and his dancing.  (He might not have been "New Wave" exactly, but he was a pop musician from the same era.)  
I liked some of it too, actually; just not as much as the pop and rock of the era when boomers were "kids" and 20-somethings, and not as much as the millie pop like I posted. But some of it was interesting. Talking Heads and Devo for example.

Quote:That is the Boomer narrative, yes:  that Generation X was bored and cynical, that they rejected the admirable visions and passions of their elders.  Since there is no logical reason why anyone would reject such obvious righteousness, there must be something "bad" about Generation X.  Yes, you guys think really highly of yourselves.  Remember, we grew up watching you.  Grew up watching the counter-culture revolution getting dropped the moment the draft was, and the idealist generation settling into complacency and materialism.

"Scratch any cynic and you'll find a disappointed idealist."  --George Carlin (1937-2008)

"All cynicism masks a failure to cope."  --John Fowles (1926-2005)

My point goes beyond the boomer narrative about Gen Xers; the difference in the sound of pop music between the 2T and the 3T is real, and seems to reflect the general attitude of Gen X toward the boomer youth era and the 2T generally. The music was less romantic and impassioned and more bland, to reflect the mood of rejecting the "righteousness" of boomers and war babies, and a less optimistic attitude no doubt because of what Gen Xers dealt with. No doubt the boomers were disappointing, in the ways you mentioned. And it's usually the case that most members of younger generations are disappointed in their elders, at least in modern saeculum times.

Of course when I referred to "boomer passions," that included some that were not so admirable to me; some boomers were reactionary and they passionately fought with the idealists, and the passion was on both sides. They grew up to be the George W Bush wing of boomers; what we call red boomers now. And those passions were also part of the 2T times, so they were expressed by more than just the young boomers, but by their elders too.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(06-09-2016, 10:51 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 10:40 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Most of us are stubborn about our political beliefs or cultural tastes.

Naturally and that i have no issue with. What i have been saying all along is where he crosses the line is when he makes remarks like we are not hearing his music correctly (do not have the ear for it) as if there is something wrong with us. Or what he said to someone else and many of us actually that we do not like biebs because he is a kid and because it is "cool" to hate him. Which implies he does not understand that someone could simply not like it. But then he would say we do not have the ear for his music. Maybe he does not for ours? He thinks music being his specialty gives him the higher ground. But that would only be true if he was being objective to the music....but he isn't. He is making it personal. I find no comedy in it tbh. Maybe you can understand my point on this. It is fine for him to like his music...but not to say what i have mentioned. But he has no trouble throwing out his specialty while not being objective, and saying there is something wrong with us for not liking his type of music (not have the ear for it and not believing we do not like it for what it is but rather blame other reasons. Can you see that point? Maybe he does not have the ear for OUR music? Has he thought of that? As i said to him he can give but cannot take. He can have his fave music. I really do not care. But he should know how he comes across when he says silly things like this. But he will ignore and carry on as usual then wonder why i continue to point it out.

Just consider something like JS Bach's Art of Fugue, the definitive expression of musical counterpoint. It is something one gets -- or does not get. It isn't for everyone. One is attuned to the thinly-veiled mathematical relations of rhythm and tones. But I can at least recognize it. Twelve-tone music? I find it hard to remember. It persists in consciousness or it might as well not exist in my universe.

I don't get Bieber, either.  But I also don't get rap 'music'.
The ideal subject of totalitarian rule is not the convinced Nazi or the dedicated Communist  but instead the people for whom the distinction between fact and fiction, true and false, no longer exists -- Hannah Arendt.


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I admitted often that I can be wrong and hear or not hear something that I hear later. Tara refuses to admit that she could be wrong, and hear or not hear something that she might hear later in some music.

I must admit I "got" Bieber from the start. I posted that I liked "Never Say Never" back in Nov.2010, when he performed for the world series that "my" team was playing in. I promptly forgot all about it and then "discovered" him again in April 2012, hearing "Somebody to Love," "Pray" and "Never Say Never" (again). It's true Bieber is not everyone's cup of tea, nor is today's pop in general; but I do think there's a lot of prejudice against him that closes peoples ears to him. That is abundantly clear from all the smears he gets, which is extraordinary considering he's just a talented young guy putting out good songs. The libertarian philosopher Stefan Molyneux set things very straight about JB and those who hate him.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyptVWcCvlY

Taramarie will no doubt claim that I am saying she hates JB like those haters Stefan describes. But I am no longer conversing directly with Tara; she's on my ignore list now for making mean remarks about me, and simply labeling them as "not mean" does not change them.

Edit to Add from the archive: Another poster, no backer of me, Amy/ASB65, chimed in early on the Bieber "shrine" and said this:

Eric, I think it's fine that you like Justin Bieber. Everyone is entitled to their own musical opinions. My older son never liked him, but then he generally has never liked any pop music. My younger son loved Justin Bieber for a while and he even had a poster of him in his room. But then his older brother teased him so much about it that he took it down and now he says he doesn't like Justin Bieber anymore. (But truth be told, since my younger son does tend to like pop music more than other kinds of music, he probably secretly still does like Bieber.)

So there's a testimony of peer pressure that people feel to get in line and dislike or hate Justin Bieber. It's a VERY prevalent thing, especially a few years ago.
"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
Reply
(06-10-2016, 11:32 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: I admitted often that I can be wrong and hear or not hear something that I hear later. Tara refuses to admit that she could be wrong, and hear or not hear something that she might hear later in some music.

I must admit I "got" Bieber from the start. I posted that I liked "Never Say Never" back in Nov.2010, when he performed for the world series that "my" team was playing in. I promptly forgot all about it and then "discovered" him again in April 2012, hearing "Somebody to Love," "Pray" and "Never Say Never" (again). It's true Bieber is not everyone's cup of tea, nor is today's pop in general; but I do think there's a lot of prejudice against him that closes peoples ears to him. That is abundantly clear from all the smears he gets, which is extraordinary considering he's just a talented young guy putting out good songs. The libertarian philosopher Stefan Molyneux set things very straight about JB and those who hate him.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyptVWcCvlY

Taramarie will no doubt claim that I am saying she hates JB like those haters Stefan describes. But I am no longer conversing directly with Tara; she's on my ignore list now for making mean remarks about me, and simply labeling them as "not mean" does not change them.

Edit to Add from the archive: Another poster, no backer of me, Amy/ASB65, chimed in early on the Bieber "shrine" and said this:

Eric, I think it's fine that you like Justin Bieber. Everyone is entitled to their own musical opinions. My older son never liked him, but then he generally has never liked any pop music. My younger son loved Justin Bieber for a while and he even had a poster of him in his room. But then his older brother teased him so much about it that he took it down and now he says he doesn't like Justin Bieber anymore. (But truth be told, since my younger son does tend to like pop music more than other kinds of music, he probably secretly still does like Bieber.)

So there's a testimony of peer pressure that people feel to get in line and dislike or hate Justin Bieber. It's a VERY prevalent thing, especially a few years ago.

Two points that you are incorrect on. 1. I never said i would not try out different music. I do it all the time. You have had a taste of the wide range of music I enjoy. But this is typical of you to push what i say about you onto me. Easier than facing your mistake I guess. We are allowed our tastes in music. You and me both. Where you are wrong is to hate on certain music to the point you say it should make changes ....funny enough so YOU will enjoy it and on top of that insinuate there is something wrong with us for not liking something you enjoy. So you see it is nothing to do with our personal tastes. It is to do with you crossing lines into our preferences and saying there is something wrong with us (do not have the ear for our music and reasons we do not like bieber other than his music). These things YOU said and therefore are your problem. Not mine. I have stated i respect other people for their tastes in music. Even if i do not appreciate what i hear of theirs. I am not the one who makes stupid commentary about someones apparent inability to like certain music you enjoy and make a list of reasons why before hearing the person out on why they don't. News flash....some may just not like his music and have nothing to do with the hate group. 2. I never once in this message got the hint of you saying i hate bieber. I would not care about that anyway. I do not hate him...that would imply i actually feel something about him and his music. He is boring to me and you cannot say i have not tried his music. I did including ones you posted. It is the same bore. Before stating someone hates bieber (other people) listen to what they say. They may say what i have been saying. That they just do not like his music. I know, it is so hard to listen and comprehend what is being said. But try all the same.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
(06-10-2016, 11:32 AM)Eric the Green Wrote: I admitted often that I can be wrong and hear or not hear something that I hear later. Tara refuses to admit that she could be wrong, and hear or not hear something that she might hear later in some music.

I must admit I "got" Bieber from the start. I posted that I liked "Never Say Never" back in Nov.2010, when he performed for the world series that "my" team was playing in. I promptly forgot all about it and then "discovered" him again in April 2012, hearing "Somebody to Love," "Pray" and "Never Say Never" (again). It's true Bieber is not everyone's cup of tea, nor is today's pop in general; but I do think there's a lot of prejudice against him that closes peoples ears to him. That is abundantly clear from all the smears he gets, which is extraordinary considering he's just a talented young guy putting out good songs. The libertarian philosopher Stefan Molyneux set things very straight about JB and those who hate him.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WyptVWcCvlY

Taramarie will no doubt claim that I am saying she hates JB like those haters Stefan describes. But I am no longer conversing directly with Tara; she's on my ignore list now for making mean remarks about me, and simply labeling them as "not mean" does not change them.

Edit to Add from the archive: Another poster, no backer of me, Amy/ASB65, chimed in early on the Bieber "shrine" and said this:

Eric, I think it's fine that you like Justin Bieber. Everyone is entitled to their own musical opinions. My older son never liked him, but then he generally has never liked any pop music. My younger son loved Justin Bieber for a while and he even had a poster of him in his room. But then his older brother teased him so much about it that he took it down and now he says he doesn't like Justin Bieber anymore. (But truth be told, since my younger son does tend to like pop music more than other kinds of music, he probably secretly still does like Bieber.)

So there's a testimony of peer pressure that people feel to get in line and dislike or hate Justin Bieber. It's a VERY prevalent thing, especially a few years ago.

Oh have i been "mean" and "icky" to you? It is called the truth which evidently you have thin skin for. Hence why you used to have a long list on your ignore list. I take it you will build that up again no doubt. Like i care that i am on your ignore list. It is a bloody blessing. It means i touched on a soft spot that you do not want to address and then on top of it try push it onto others despite the words coming out of your own mouth. Face up to it Eric. It does not matter if you have put me on ignore. I know you are reading these words. Self improvement is not a bad thing. Btw i agree with amy. Everyone is entitled to their own musical opinions. Where it crosses lines is where you push your own opinion of others tastes onto your music and say there is something wrong with us for not liking it (for reasons i should not have to repeat again and again). You could say that was mean and icky.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






Reply
(06-10-2016, 09:33 AM)pbrower2a Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 10:51 PM)taramarie Wrote:
(06-09-2016, 10:40 PM)pbrower2a Wrote: Most of us are stubborn about our political beliefs or cultural tastes.

Naturally and that i have no issue with. What i have been saying all along is where he crosses the line is when he makes remarks like we are not hearing his music correctly (do not have the ear for it) as if there is something wrong with us. Or what he said to someone else and many of us actually that we do not like biebs because he is a kid and because it is "cool" to hate him. Which implies he does not understand that someone could simply not like it. But then he would say we do not have the ear for his music. Maybe he does not for ours? He thinks music being his specialty gives him the higher ground. But that would only be true if he was being objective to the music....but he isn't. He is making it personal. I find no comedy in it tbh. Maybe you can understand my point on this. It is fine for him to like his music...but not to say what i have mentioned. But he has no trouble throwing out his specialty while not being objective, and saying there is something wrong with us for not liking his type of music (not have the ear for it and not believing we do not like it for what it is but rather blame other reasons. Can you see that point? Maybe he does not have the ear for OUR music? Has he thought of that? As i said to him he can give but cannot take. He can have his fave music. I really do not care. But he should know how he comes across when he says silly things like this. But he will ignore and carry on as usual then wonder why i continue to point it out.

Just consider something like JS Bach's Art of Fugue, the definitive expression of musical counterpoint. It is something one gets -- or does not get. It isn't for everyone. One is attuned to the thinly-veiled mathematical relations of rhythm and tones. But I can at least recognize it. Twelve-tone music? I find it hard to remember. It persists in consciousness or it might as well not exist in my universe.

I don't get Bieber, either.  But I also don't get rap 'music'.

Difference is you understand it and look at it objectively. He doesn't. He personalizes it and that is where i have a problem with it. He says we are allowed our tastes in music but constantly lets loose his bias towards certain music (which is fine) but crosses lines to say we are not into it because there is something wrong with us other than us simply not liking it for what it is. That is way out of line. But this is the guy who does tend to go way out of line (cough *groping* cough) then say there is something wrong with us just because we do not agree to personal attacks whether it be groping or personal attack on us simply not liking his music. I also do not get biebs or rap either. I have tried both and still do not get it.
1984 Apollonian Civic
ISFP - The Artist.






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I guess I'll make this my 70's shrine thread. Cool   Ah yes, so many bad jams on FM radio.


---Value Added Cool
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Another awesome stuff from Bad Company







---Value Added Cool
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The best I can find from 1981:



"I close my eyes, and I can see a better day" -- Justin Bieber

Keep the spirit alive;
Eric M
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I am going to interpret best songs as favorite songs. For me in 1973 it was Layla.  By the late 1970's it was Born to Run. In the 1980's I got into New Wave, and faves were Girl's Talk and Cruel to be Kind.  The last album I bought on vinyl was New Order.  Since then I have been more into classical.  My fave (relatively recent) classical piece is the theme for the Mission.

If I go through the entire corpus of Western music, I would have to say the most kick-ass piece ever written was Beethoven's Ninth just because of the choral.
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(06-10-2016, 08:10 PM)Mikebert Wrote: I am going to interpret best songs as favorite songs. For me in 1973 it was Layla.  By the late 1970's it was Born to Run. In the 1980's I got into New Wave, and faves were Girl's Talk and Cruel to be Kind.  The last album I bought on vinyl was New Order.  Since then I have been more into classical.  My fave (relatively recent) classical piece is the theme for the Mission.

If I go through the entire corpus of Western music, I would have to say the most kick-ass piece ever written was Beethoven's Ninth just because of the choral.

Sounds like a good idea.
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I'm indecisive and it's hard for me to narrow down "favorites" of anything, but I will post a few songs that I think are really special.

I guess we'll start with Radiohead, from 2001:



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Joy Division, "Atmosphere" (1979):




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Roberta Flack, "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," (1969):



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More from my home decade, the 70's  Cool







---Value Added Cool
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(06-11-2016, 01:52 AM)Ragnarök_62 Wrote: More from my home decade, the 70's  Cool








Toys In the Attic, good album. "Oooo, it's a sunny day outside my window..."
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